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Found 8,467 results

  1. Hi, I realised after I sent the posting that the picture was Cllr Lambert. For many years he lived opposite us on Archer Lane. He has the block of flats in the Park complex named after him, Harold Lambert Court. Cheers, Wazzie Worrall
  2. Has anyone got any information etc on when the housing in that area of Sheffield was built, and by who. The area is private housing and a combination of detached, semi-detached and bungalows. It is quite a large area stretching from Abbey Lane upto the borders with Bradway, inc Westwick Road, Crescent. Old Park Road, Avenue, Cockshutt Road, Crescent etc. Any info would be welcome
  3. I am trying to solve/research the history of a trophy “Presented by the Workmen & Friends of STC to J Lyon April 10th 1883”. J Lyon would be Joseph Lyon(s) originally from Waddington in Lincolnshire. Married to Emma (nee Staples) also from Lincolnshire. The trophy has been passed down the family through generations however, the story behind what it was presented for has long been lost/forgotten. On the1881 census Joseph’s occupation is recorded as Stable Labourer. He and his family are living at 19 Mill Lane, Attercliffe Cum Darnell , Sheffield. Joseph died (unknown) just 3 years later in 1886. Working on the assumption that The STC were probably Joseph’s employer. Can anyone please share any information in identifying who/what the STC were? If there are any surviving employee records? Any information greatly appreciated John O.
  4. SHEFFIELD TRAMS Sheffield Tramway was an extensive tramway network serving the city of Sheffield and its suburbs. The first tramway line, which was horse-drawn, started in 1873 with the opening of a line between Lady's Bridge and Attercliffe. This line was subsequently extended to Brightside and Tinsley. Routes were built to Heeley, where a tram depot was built, Nether Edge and Hillsborough. In 1899, the first electric tram ran between Nether Edge and Tinsley. By 1902 all the routes were electrified. By 1910, the Sheffield Tramway network covered 39 miles, in 1951 the network was extended to 48 miles. The last trams ran between Leopold Street and Beauchief on 8 October 1960—three Sheffield trams were subsequently preserved at the National Tramway Museum in Crich. History The horse tram era The Sheffield horse tramway was created under the Tramways Act 1870, with powers granted in July 1872. The first routes, to Attercliffe and Carbrook, Brightside, Heeley, Nether Edge and Owlerton opened between 1873 and 1877. Under the legislation at that time, local authorities were precluded from operating tramways but were empowered to construct them and lease the lines to an individual operating company. Tracks were constructed by contractors and leased to the Sheffield Tramways Company who operated the services. Prior to the inauguration of the horse trams, horse buses had provided a limited public service but road surfaces were at that time of poor quality and their carrying capacity were small. The new horse trams gave smoother rides, traveling on steel rails and were an improvement over previous alternatives. The fares were too high for the average worker so the horse trams saw little patronage, services began later than when workers began their day so were of little use to most. Running costs were high as the operator had to keep a large number of horses and could not offer low fares. It was common practice to paint tramcars in different colours according to the route operated. This allowed both illiterate and the educated, literally, to identify a tram. The electric tram era The Sheffield Corporation (Sheffield City Council) took over the tramway system in July 1896. The Corporation's goal was to expand and mechanise the system. Almost immediately a committee was formed to inspect other tramway systems to look at the improved systems of traction. Upon their return the committee recommended the adoption of electrical propulsion using the overhead current collection system. The national grid was not as developed as it is now and so the Corporation set out to provide the required current. The Corporation were to become their local domestic and industrial electricity supplier were the additional load would be sold. A power station was built for the Sheffield Corporation Tramways on Kelham Island by the river Don between Mowbray Street and Alma Street. Feeder cables stretched from there to the extremeties of the system, covering over forty miles of route. Network The Sheffield Tramway Company's original horse drawn tram network was 9½ miles long and radiated from the city centre to Tinsley, Brightside, Hillsborough, Nether Edge and Heeley. A few years after the Sheffield Corporation took over, horse tramways were gradually and completely replaced firstly by single deck electric tramcars then by double decker tramcars. It extended routes to Beauchief and Woodseats in 1927 and to Darnall and Intake in 1928. Adjacent lines were converted into circular route by sleep track connecting links. The line along Abbey Lane, linking Beauchief to Woodseats was one of them and its entirety was built on reserved track. The last extensions were opened in 1934 and extended the network to Lane Top, via Firth Park.Three small sections, Fulwood Road, Nether Edge and Petre St were closed between 1925 and 1936. In 1952, the Corporation closed 2 sections (inc. the Abbey Lane line), followed by the rest of the network between 1954 and 1960. Tram depots Over the years eight depots were built throughout the city to service a fleet of about 400 trams. Tinsley tram depot Tinsley tram depot (53°24′28″N, 1°24′45″W) was built in 1874 and was the first depot built in Sheffield for the "Sheffield Tramways Company". It was originally built for horse trams but was converted for electric trams in 1898–1899 after which it was capable of accommodating 95 tram cars. Following the abandonment of the tramway system in 1960, the Tinsley depot was sold and was subsequently used as a warehouse. Much of the original 1874 building still exists and the entire depot is listed as a historically significant building. The Sheffield Bus Museum Trust has used part of the depot as a museum since May 1987. Heeley tram depot Heeley tram depot (53°21′31.5″N, 1°28′28″W) was the depot for horse trams only, the line to it was never electrified. The depot was built by the Sheffield Tramways company in 1878. When the tram system was abandoned in 1960, the depot was sold and subsequently used as a car repair shop until 2005. The building has been sold and flats will be built incorporating the structure, as it is a listed building Nether Edge depot A small tram shed was built at the Nether Edge terminus (53°21′35″N, 1°29′18″W), which opened in 1899. The Nether Edge line as well as two other small sections was abandoned due to the narrowness of the streets the tram travelled on. This caused problems and was unsuitable for efficient service. The Sheffield Corporation concluded that trams were better for city service. Queens Road works The Queens Road works (53°22′8″N, 1°27′52″W) opened in 1905. Many of the trams used on the Sheffield tramway were built at Queens Road. The building survived for many years following abandonment, but was demolished in the 1990s. Shoreham Street depot Construction of the Shoreham Street depot (53°22′36″N, 1°27′54″W) started in about 1910 on the site of an 18th century leadmill. Following the abandonment of the tramway the depot was used as a bus garage for many years until it finally closed in the 1990s. Much of the building has since been demolished and redeveloped as student flats, although those parts that surround the entrance at the junction of Shoreham Street and Leadmill Road are still standing and in good condition. Crookes tram depot The Crookes depot, which was located on Pickmere Road (53°23′1″N, 1°30′25″W), was started in 1914, but not completed until 1919. It closed on 5 May 1957 and has since been demolished. Tenter Street depot The Tenter Street depot (53°23′2″N, 1°28′21″W) opened in 1928 and was the last tram depot to remain in operational use. As well as the tram depot there was a bus garage on the upper level that was accessed from Hawley Street. Holme Lane depot (Hillsborough) The depot at Holme Lane (53°24′7″N, 1°30′12″W) closed on 23 April 1954. The facade of the building still stands, although the rest of the building has been demolished and a medical centre built in its place. Rolling stock Unlike other tram companies, whose trams were often rebuilt and made to last thirty to forty years, Sheffield Corporation adopted a praiseworthy policy of replacement by new vehicles after a twenty-five year life. The corporation never really stopped acquiring new rolling stock and by 1940, only eleven of its 444 trams were older than twenty-six years, more than half of them were less than ten. In its history, Sheffield Corporation operated 884 tramcars. Its last livery was the blue and cream livery, which is still worn on the preserved trams at Crich and Beamish. The 'Preston' cars The United Electric Car Company of Preston built 15 double deck balcony cars for Sheffield Corporation Tramways in 1907. Initially numbered 258–272 they had wooden seats for 59 passengers, and were mounted on a 4-wheel Peckham P22 truck with two Metrovick 102DR 60 hp motors operated by BTH B510 controllers. The braking systems comprised of a handbrake acting on all wheels, an electric brake for emergency use and a hand-wheel operated track brake. Between December 1924 and July 1927 they were rebuilt with a totally-enclosed upper deck. The 'Rocker Panel' cars Following the production of a prototype at the Sheffield Corporation Tramways Queens Road works in 1917, between 1919 and 1927 Brush at Loughborough built 100 of these cars, another 50 at were built at Cravens in Darnall. The 'Standard' cars The prototype Standard Car (numbered 1) was built by Cravens at Darnall, and entered service in 1927. Subsequently about 150 more were built at the Queens Road works and 25 were built by W.E. Hill & Sons in South Shields. From 1936–1939 the Queens Road works built redesigned Standard Cars, which were known as the 'Domed-roof' Class and had improved lighting and seats The 'Roberts' cars The prototype for this series (number 501) was built at the Queens Road works in August 1946. WIth comfortable upholstered seating for 62 passengers it was the last car to be built at the works From 1950–1952 35 more of these double deck trams, numbered 502–536 were constructed by Charles Roberts & Co. of Wakefield (now Bombardier Eurorail). They were carried on a 4-wheel Maley and Taunton hornless type 588 truck with rubber and leaf spring suspension. The cars were powered by two Metrovick 101 DR3 65 hp motors. Air brakes were fitted, acting on all wheels, and electric braking was available for emergency use. Car 536, which entered service on 11 April 1952, was the last tram to be constructed for the Sheffield tramway. Representing the ultimate development of the traditional British 4-wheel tramcar, the class worked for only 10 years, as Sheffield tramway was closed in 1960. On 8 October of that year, car 513, a member of the class ran specially decorated in the final procession; so too did sister tram 510, now preserved by the National Tramway Museum at Crich. The National Tramway Museum, Crich The National Tramway Museum at Crich in Derbyshire holds eight former Sheffield trams. Sheffield Corporation Tramways car number 15 is a horse tram dating from 1874; it was the first tram to be used at the museum in 1963. Car number 74 is another Victorian Sheffield tram that was sold to the Gateshead tramway and ran until 1951. Although only its lower deck survived, in use as a garden shed, it has now been restored to original condition by the museum. The museum also has Standard car number 189, a Domed-roof car (number 264), and a Roberts car (number 510). In addition there are two works cars from the Sheffield fleet and an early single-deck Sheffield tram that is not in working condition. Remnants There are few remnants of the, once extensive, tramway. The tram sheds at Tinsley and Heeley survive, as do parts of those at Holme Lane and Shoreham Street. In many places the tram tracks were not removed, the road was resurfaced over the tracks, and the tracks still survive (albeit covered). An example of tracks covered in this way was uncovered and made a feature of The Moor pedestrian precinct. Around the City there are about ten or so of the "overhead" poles still standing(2006), such as the matching pair in Firth Park, where you can also see a small section of track in the middle of the traffic island. Poles also survive at Manor Top, Woodseats and Abbeydale Road. In places where the trams ran on a reserved track, such as on Abbeydale Road South and Abbey Lane at Beauchief, the reservation has been converted into a dual carriage-way. This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License and sources material from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheffield_Tramway LINKS Wikipedia's Excellent Article On Sheffield Tramways - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheffield_Tramway Sheffield In The Age Of The Trams Book - Click Here To Buy The Book Sheffield Trams Link - http://www.cyberpictures.net/sheffield/s1.htm More Sheffield Trams Pictures - http://www.railfaneurope.net/pix/gb/trams/...ffield/pix.html
  5. Opposite the cinema by Leppings lane was a newsagent run by Ron Starling who was an ex professional footballer.
  6. I have been given a photograpic reproduction of a postcard of Shiregreen Road no 1172 on the back of it. I have looked at an old map of the area 1850ish and it does look as if it could be Shiregreen Lane towards the end where it leads to Wincobank Hall. Has anyone else seen a similar photo at all?
  7. Kelly's directory, published 1925. Simmonett Walter, plumber, 43 Sitwell Road, (Sharrow). Simmonett Walter, plumber, 14 Ellin Street, (Town, Moorfoot area). Simmonett Arnold, (junior), plumber, 24 Rushdale Avenue, (Meersbrook). Simmonett Walter Ernest, (junior) plumber, 26 Murray Road, (Greystones). White's directory, published 1911. Simmonett Walter, plumber, house: 37 Sitwell Road, (Sharrow). Simmonett Walter, plumber, Hermitage Lane, (Town, Moorfoot area). Simmonett Walter Ernest, (junior) plumber, 26 Murray Road, (Greystones). White's, published 1905. Simmonett Walter (junior), plumber, 37 Sitwell Road, (Sharrow).
  8. I have just been looking through this interesting site. ----------- http://ceegee-viewfromahill.blogspot.com/2015/02/a-walk-through-crookes-crosspool-and.html Information about Mount Zion has been asked for before, but a long time ago, not much came of it unless I missed something so I will try again. Does anyone know the detailed history of Mount Zion Please? And perhaps an easier question, is that thing on the top of the tower just an early lightning conductor, if so someone may know why it is that shape? It wasn't there in later years.
  9. As you travel down the lane toward the bottom of the slope and just before the right hand bend in the field there is a rectangular brick single storey building with a concrete slab as a roof ....It looks very second world war( ish) and I wonder if anyone knows what it was?
  10. Dixon Lane in Sheffield City Centre in the early 1960s showing Burton's clothes shop is it?
  11. Family deaths: PASS Martha 4 May 1845 50 Sheffield, Bailey Lane widow St Peter PASS George 20 Feb 1849 infant Sheffield, Bailey Lane son of Charles (grinder) St Peter PASS Martha 22 Feb 1835 infant Sheffield, Bailey Lane daughter of Joseph (grinder) St Peter PASS Sarah 21 Jan 1838 1 year old or one day old Sheffield, Bailey Ln daughter of Joseph (grinder) St Peter PASS Mary 14 Sep 1842 infant Sheffield, Bailey Lane daughter of John St Peter PASS Margaret 14 Jul 1844 29 Sheffield, Bailey Lane widow of Joseph (grinder) St Peter I think George Hunter was The grandson of Martha Pass. Relatives of Ernest and Ann Hunter HUNTER Joseph 20 Sep 1835 infant Sheffield, Bailey Lane so Ernest (cutler) St Peter HUNTER George 14 Jul 1854 17 Sheffield, Bailey Lane so Ernest (cutler) St Peter HUNTER Samuel 10 Sep 1852 1 Sheffield, Bailey Lane so Ernest (cutler) St Peter In 1856 Ernest Hunter was now a shopkeeper at 32 Bailey Lane he was still there in 1862 but by 1879 Frederick.Dixon listed as shop & beer retailer had bought the shop.
  12. 26 Jan 1910 Sheffield Daily Telegraph A CHAPELTOWN TRAGEDY OF 45 YEARS AGO __________________ Recalled by a Letter from Australia __________________ Mrs Ann Walton, an inmate of Sir Edward Sylvester's Almshouses, Mortomley Lane End, has received the following letter from her cousin Solomon Stenton, who was in 1865, at York Assizes, sentenced to 20 years penal servitude for the manslaughter of his grandmother Eliza Drabble at Chapeltown nr Sheffield in March 1865. Post Office, Waddington, Western Australia December 12. 1909 My dear Cousin. – I take the opportunity to write to let you know I am still alive, and well except that rheumatics torment me occasionally. I had a letter from Joe 4 years ago which I answered but I cannot hear any tidings of Bentley. I am getting the old age pension now which is a great help to me. I should like to communicate with Thomas Fairies, and Mrs Howson, if they are still alive. I remember Ben Whyke as on the day I left England; also Shep Barras, Pincher, Link Jackson, Toby and Tom Howson. Send my best regards to Eliza Rodgers. The happiest days of my life out here is when I am in the bush with my gun and my dog. The poor old lady (my wife) died 4 years ago, and I am left all to myself. Send me a long letter and let me know if Joe is still in Canada, and I will write to him. We are having very warm weather out here – 100 degrees in the shade. I will conclude now by wishing you a happy New Year. – I remain, your affectionate Cousin. SOLOMON STENTON At the time of the tragedy on March, 1865, Solomon Stenton worked at Thorncliffe Ironworks and lived with his grandmother at Greenhead, Chapeltown. It was payday at Thorncliffe and Stenton met the old lady at night and gave her his wages. The two spent some time together at one of the local inns and set off for home around 9pm. Shortly afterwards Eliza Stenton was found lying upon the road at Greenhead. She was dead and had been brutally ill used. Her grandson Solomon was the last person seen with her, and as he could not give a satisfactory explanation he was arrested and at the Coroners inquest the jury returned a verdict of 'Wilful murder' against him. At the Assizes in York, the capital charge was reduced to manslaughter. He was found guilty and sentenced to 20 years transportation. A very large number of Chapeltown people, however had strong opinions that Stenton was innocent, and this feeling spread, and another man's name was freely mentioned as the possible culprit. In 1877 the matter was taken up by request of Mr Tom Fairies, and at a public meeting he was requested to prepare a petition to the authorities, praying for the case to be reopened. The petition was duly signed by a large number of persons and duly forwarded to the Right Hon. Richard Cross, Home Secretary at that time who duly acknowledged the receipt of the same. After some time had lapsed an official intimation reached Chapeltown that Stenton had been liberated on Ticket of Leave having served 12 years of his sentence. It is very likely that Stenton wishes to communicate with Mr Fairies on account of the services of the latter.
  13. Hi Bob, Yes I remember Mr Spur's Beetle, although I'm a little vague on actual detail. Did it have the 'split oval' rear window? Was it only three speed? I've no memory of Mr Ioson' s Borgward Isabella, but I remember his bike. My brother always insisted that he llived on School Lane at Norton, but my brother was prone to get things mixed up! . However, I do remember that Mr Dyson had an 'inverted rear window' Ford Anglia - must have been quite a new model when we were in J3/4? We'll keep on probing my old pal! Best wishes, Wazzie
  14. Heppenstall Lane in Attercliffe, Sheffield 1952
  15. Hello frechylass , The Old No 12 (Market Tavern) Berni Inn was on Exchange Street. I may be wrong here but I think the Dore Grill on Church Lane, Dore was a Berni Inn. There are a few posts on here mentioning Berni Inns, There might be the odd comment in one of those that helps, link below . ---------- EDIT I think the one on Orchard Street was just called Berni Steak Bar or something like that. https://cse.google.co.uk/cse?cx=partner-pub-3209186142524727%3A3018540469&ie=UTF-8&q=&sa=Search#gsc.tab=0
  16. sovrappeso : The shops on Derbyshire Lane from the 1957 Kellys Street Directory
  17. Can any one help me pinpoint the location of Deep Pit Colliery? (see image). On the Census taken in 1851 my Ancesters are living at Deep Pit Cottage . Regards Southside
  18. I remember buying a flat pink packet at a School Fete of what I thaught were sugar crystals. Put my finger in to suck the flavour! turned out it was 'Pink Blancmange Powder' UGH! - Once blew a giant pink 'Bubble of Bubble Gum'. The wind blew the bubble back into my hair. Oh what a mess! took ages to get out, with quite a bit of my hair by being cut. My Mum told me, that when visiting her cousins who lived near the railway in Chesterfield, they would put old 'Pennies On The Line', sit and wait till a train had gone past, then go and pick up the 'Flattened' coins. - She also told me that she ate 'COAL' as a little one. Wonder if that's why she lost all her teeth at 18.
  19. Looking at the pictures on picture Sheffield, I found a few that piqued my curiosity. There is a picture of the Great Yorkshire show, Coal Aston Aerodrome ( http://www.picturesheffield.com/cgi-bin/pi...ff.refno=u03685 ), showing a large area, apparently nothing like, or near the place at the top of Dyche lane. There are some other aerial photos of the site, and the implication ( http://www.picturesheffield.com/cgi-bin/pi...ff.refno=s15316 ) is that it occupied space to the South East of the Norton Hotel, around what is now Gilders and Meadowhead college, and not what I would call Coal Aston at all. Another photo shows a Vickers Vimy there - and a search then turned up this: http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/vie...20-%201020.html Does anyone know more about: The Aerodrome - it appears to still have had some purpose in 1920 ( http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/written...aston-aerodrome ), it wasn't a small site and can't have been secret, so why don't we know more? or The visit of these flight pioneers to Sheffield?
  20. Hello everyone! I'm doing research on behalf of Tapton Hall about their history for the upcoming Heritage Day events. I'm mainly focusing on the Shore/Nightingale Family. Vickers Family and Wilson Family alongside the Masonic history. I have most of the information, but thought it was worth asking to see if there was anything I could add! If anyone has any information about these families, or any personal connection to the Hall then please let me know. Especially looking for photographs, maps or items which could be displayed.
  21. The one picture I wish I could see again was printed with this article in the early fifties. I wonder if any of the families mentioned has it, my grandmother was one of them mentioned we have the article but no picture.A small piece of social history. We need to take a firmer grasp of this paradox----that our very differences show our unity. It will restore our faith in ourselves; It will enable us to see (IN THE KINGS WORDS); We have not proved unworthy of our past, And we can do better in the years ahead. In skill, genius, enterprise, imaginativeness, virility, and courage we lack nothing that is needed to give us the industrial prosperity our fathers built. Every workshop in the land can give evidence of that. And who can say that court 13 watery lane, off St Philips Road, does not give the best evidence of all the continuance of the spirit which made us great. There the families have painted their humble dwellings----so humble that they are marked down for demolition. That is their proud salute to the Festival Of Britain. It is a fitting footnote, for only by the happiness in British homes can British greatness be measured. Five families paint for the festival. Court 13 Watery lane off St Philips Road Sheffield shines with new paint, the festival of Britain gesture of five families who have repainted their cottages. Inside the two roomed homes of Mrs Nellie Dixon at number two and Mr and Mrs Simmonite at number three, there are new decorations,a tiled fireplace, and a white scullery. The houses are listed for eventual demolition. After their landlord had supplied a new asbestos roof, the families got busy outside with paint and borrowed ladders. "Because we have been asked to make our homes as bright as possible for the festival" They were joined by Mrs Hilda Ford at number ten. Mr and Mrs T Hayes at number nine and Mr and Mrs J Hobson of number 91 Watery lane which is in the court. They have done the job in a fortnight. Mrs Ford a table knife cutler painting on returning from work at teatime. Mrs Dixons daughter Mrs Cooper of Martin street is another member of the team "We all get on very well together" Mrs Simmonite said last night.
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