Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for 'coal pit lane'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • SHEFFIELD HISTORY
    • SHEFFIELD HISTORY CHAT
    • SHEFFIELD PLACES - NOW GONE
    • SHEFFIELD NIGHTCLUBS
    • SHEFFIELD PUBS & WMC's
    • SHEFFIELD SHOPS
    • SHEFFIELD CINEMAS, THEATRES & MUSIC HALLS
    • SHEFFIELD MOVIES & FILM LOCATIONS
    • SHEFFIELD MUSIC AND BANDS FROM SHEFFIELD
    • SHEFFIELD SPORT
    • SHEFFIELD CELEBRITIES
    • SHEFFIELD RESTAURANTS AND CAFE'S
    • SHEFFIELD GENEALOGY
    • SHEFFIELD MAPS
    • SHEFFIELD SCHOOLS
    • SHEFFIELD BUSES, TRAMS & TRAINS
    • SHEFFIELD CHURCHES AND RELIGIOUS BUILDINGS
    • SHEFFIELD WAR YEARS AND THE SHEFFIELD BLITZ
    • MADE IN SHEFFIELD
    • SHEFFIELD RELATED VIDEO CLIPS
    • SHEFFIELD WEBSITES
    • SHEFFIELD PEOPLE REUNITED
    • SHEFFIELD SHOPPING
    • SHEFFIELD EBAY ITEMS
    • THE MOJO CLUB
    • NON SHEFFIELD HISTORY
    • GENERAL CHAT
    • INTRODUCTIONS & SITE SUGGESTIONS

Product Groups

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


First Name


Surname


Location


Interests


Facebook


Twitter


Instagram


Website URL

Found 8,508 results

  1. Could this be 'Empire Day' celebrations ?
  2. See the entry under SCHOOLS to find details of the latest Reunion event at Sharrow Lane School. Edit: Link ..
  3. tozzin

    Hope For 2020

    One thing I would love to see restored is the Montgomery Monument on Broad Lane/Red Hill, for absolute years it been left to decay through the weather and vandalism, when I see stupid projects that have money thrown at them it makes my blood boil when I think of the Montgomery Monument, that’s part of the history of Sheffield, which was paid for by public subscription is left to “Fend for itself “ so to speak, absolutely deplorable.
  4. The current building seems to have been built in 1880 by the Smith Bros, ivory dealers, and from the outset was called the Albert Works. The Smiths originally had the ground floor and rented the rest out to the Brook Brothers who were silver platers. The Smith Brothers partnership had been dissolved in 1864 (Thomas and Ann, his sister in law, Ivory, Pearl and Tortoise-shell Cutters and Dealers based at the Washington Works). The Smith Brothers ivory dealing business continued at the Washington Works until late 1880 when they moved into their newly built premises on Cambridge Street. Just over a year later it suffered from a fire, The Independent referred to the premises as the Albert Works while mysteriously the Telegraph called them the Helmet Works. So was the inscribed keystone re-used from the building that was on the plot previously - Edward Linley, Sheep Shear Manufacturer? See the 1884 newspaper article below. John Linley, Master Cutler in 1797 was a scissorsmith based at Spring Street, so possibly can be eliminated. An advert for the sale of Linley's premises in 1857. It appears that the Smith Brothers of Washington Works bought the premises, as in April 1859 they advertised that "TO LET and may be entered upon on and after the 26th day of April next, the PREMISES situated on Coalpit-lane now in the occupation of Mr Edward Linley, Sheep Shear Manufacturer - For further Particulars inquire of SMITH BROTHERS, Washington Works" : A letter possibly written by William Topham, who made the sketches of old Coal Pit Lane: Edward Linley died aged 65 at St Mary's Road on 2nd December 1879. The Linley family were at Coalpit Lane in 1841:
  5. Details of the much-requested next reunion of pupils from the years 1948-1958 are now available. It will take place at noon on Wednesday 27 November in the school hall cafe. Numbers will be strictly limited to 30 but if demand is sufficient then an additional date can be arranged. THIS WILL BE A CHRISTMAS LUNCH EVENT with turkey, pigs in blankets and all the trimmings, and an attractive seasonal vegetarian option. A hot drink, cracker and mints is included in the price. Dessert will be a choice of a mincemeat crumble or a chocolate pudding. One course £10.95, two courses £11.95. A decision is yet to be made on whether to make wine available or to accept corkage. A deposit of £5 will be required. Closing date for the deposit will be 12 November. I am happy to arrange for table reservations for groups who notify me of numbers in advance. I will also seek permission to have music to accompany carols etc if we get a good crowd. To participate in this event please respond to this notice as soon as possible. I will be monitoring responses. Or send me a personal message through this Forum. DO NOT SEND MONEY JUST YET! I will give details of how this will be done in the course of the next couple of weeks. But it is essential that, if this event is to happen and be successful, you tell all your peer group and get them to respond quickly. I shall also be posting this notice on the Sheffield Forum and will be contacting all those whose email addresses I already have. If you don't get an email from me it will be because I don't have your email address listed. David France (1946-53)
  6. Hi RichardB do you have this one in your files ? it was at the end of moonshine lane,southey end (magnet). Dean.
  7. I think some of these may still exist? Fulwood Head Road. Boundary Gleadless Road. Brookhouse Hill. Opposite Cottages & Chapel Green Lane. Near Wood, Walkley Bank Road. Hagg Lane No. 1. Grange Farm (could be Grange Fm at Norton?). New Trough Roper Hill.
  8. Does anyone have any memories or pictures of the Corner Shop on Derbyshire Lane in Meersbrook. I have looked on Picture Sheffield and found one picture but any extra info or pictures would be great. I am Assistant Producer for Wall to Wall media and we are filming the next back in Time series for the BBC in Sheffield this summer. Thanks!
  9. Does anyone remember the people in this photo? One is Big Ada from the old market on Dixon Lane Any memories of these people at all?
  10. As most of my family appear to have lived around what is now Upperthorpe, Netherthorpe, through to the town centre along Solly Street and Townhead Street, I was hoping to find Coalpit Lane near there as I have a branch of my family living there. I know roads ‘disappear’ over time and wondered which map I should look at to see if there ever existed Coalpit Lane in this area. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
  11. Finally I have a few minutes to report on the latest Sharrow Lane School Reunion held on Wednesday 26th June. Altogether 29 former pupils and Sharrow residents turned up, the youngest aged 71 and the eldest, I think, 85. We had a terrific two hour session of exchanging memories and revelling in the atmosphere of the old Junior School Hall. With their permission, here is a list of those present: (The ladies consented to using their maiden names) Valerie Shaw; Christine France; Brian Milner; Tony Ford; Denis Anson; Mick Glossop; Jack wade; Alan Barnett; Tony Faulds MBE; Dave Holmes; Dave Storf; Ian Brelsford; Malcolm Gladwin; Ralph Holmes; Frank Turner; keith Spooner; John Beatson; Tony Hardwick; Roger Walker; John Smith; Phil Smith; Roger Stevenson; Graham Whitham; Darrell Whitham; Pauline Mackreal; Diane Goodwin; Ronald Hibbert and myself, David France. It was soon agreed that there should be another reunion later this year and so it has been decided there will be a special Christmas Lunch event at 1pm on Wednesday 27th November 2019 but places MUST be pre-booked through me. A price for the lunch will be published nearer the date. Watch this space! The photographs here show what a cordial and relaxed event it was. Book your space for November now by sending me a personal message.
  12. From Sheffield Independent 21 October 1872 PERSONAL RECOLLECTIONS OF BROAD LANE AND ITS VICINITY. “Brickholes.” This comprised the large brickfield that extended from St. John’s street, nearly to Bailey lane. This was the property of the late Thomas Harrison, Esq.,the father of Miss Harrison, of Weston. ‘The chief manager of this brickyard was old Joseph Marsden, the father of Tom Marsden, afterwards the celebrated cricket player, but who then worked with his father at making bricks. A large space out of which the clay had been dug became by supplies from various sources filled with water, so as to form a pond extending from Newcastle street to a little beyond Rockingham street. In the winter seasons this was a noted place for sliding and skating. In one part the water was of such a depth that I once saw a person have a very narrow escape from drowning. It was a winter’s day, the ice being of great thickness, when, just at dusk, a man who was coming from Trippet lane to Broad lane, in crossing over did not happen to see that there was a hole broken in the ice ; and in he went over head! With his hands grasping the edge of the ice he cried out loudly and piteously for help, when a tall young man, snatching a knur stick out of my hand, and another, similarly provided, rushed to his aid, and rescued the poor fellow from his extreme peril. The part of Rockingham street where this occurrence took place is, of course, “made ground” across the “Brick hole;” and certain portions of Newcastle street and St. Thomas street are the same. These “ personal recollections of Broad lane” it will hardly do to conclude without some brief reference to its annual “ festival”—an event long anticipated and much* enjoyed, especially by the young folks. It was held on “Holy Thursday,” and regarded as a general holiday. In preparation for it during the previous week, there was a great stir of whitewashing and cleaning, so as to put on the very best appearance. On that day the Sunday clothes were worn. The best thing about that “Festival,” as it now appears to me, was that it partook very much of the spirit and character of a social gathering of relatives and friends—when the married daughter came to her former home with her children to see “grandmother,” and aunts and uncles, with youthful cousins of both sexes, met in kindly association, indulged in joke and laughter, and keenly enjoying ball-play and all other innocent merriments. Such, at least, was my home experience; and, from all I saw, my impression is that of our neighbours was of a similar kind, But the great attraction for us youngsters was the gingerbread stalls, the ‘* crankies,” the swings, the puppet shows, and the “races.” The open space at the bottom of Townhead street and Broad lane was just like a “fair.” Amidst all this life and animation, restless activity, din, and turmoil, in perfect contrast might be seen the “ blacksmith,” with pipe in his mouth, and bare brawny arms resting on the smithy door, looking on the busy scene, with countenance calm and complacent. But the grand expectation and sight were the “races.” These were run by donkeys and ponies; the “jockeys” being generally milk boys out of the country ; who, disencumbering their asses of saddles and milk barrels, prepared for the contest. The prizes usually were a hat, a smock-frock, or a teapot; and the “courses” Bailey field, Bailey lane, and Broad lane. How the riders managed to rush up and down the steepness of Bailey field, and the narrowness of Bailey lane without some breaking of the necks or limbs, either of themselves or the spectators, is to me up to this day a mystery. Wearing the new hat, adorned with flying colours, his ruddy face and bright eyes beaming with conscious triumph, the victor, after re-saddling his ass, was then accompanied a short distance homeward, amidst shrill and loud, and hearty acclamations. Such, in“ auld lang syne,” was Broad lane Feast. There is just another spot that I intended to have touched upon, the “ Brocco” and “ Jericho,” but I have already trespassed on your space. Hoping that these reminiscences of one locality of “Old Sheffield,” about half a century ago, may not be unacceptable to at least a certain class of the readers of the Independent, I remain, Mr. Editor, your obliged, S. E.
  13. Very interesting Edmund! Several bridges across the Porter appear to have simply been called 'Porter Bridge' during the 19th century, however this one is called 'Bramall Lane Bridge' on the 1855 Ordnance Survey map (so shortly after the improvement). Towards the Decathlon end of the bridge there is a join in the stone work which seems to show a different date of construction (although the style remains the same) so the 1864 work reference is interesting!
  14. According to Leader's Reminiscences: "Porter street was a pleasant field road called Ladies' Walk. There were trees on one side of it, and you crossed the Porter by a foot bridge. That led into Bramall lane and forward across fields to Heeley" - unfortunately no precise date of this observation is given. In 1846 an Improvement Act was passed, which amongst other measures included: " Porter street, Porter Bridge, and Brammall lane. This is a widening of the Bridge and approach to it, both from Porter street and Bramall lane. The schedule includes very little property" - so the bridge's name was also Porter Bridge. The bridge was widened again in 1864, the work started in early January and continued for several months.
  15. Hello All, I've continued to look into the story of Bramall Lane Bridge (earlier posts will seem confusing now as I have learned the name of the bridge since I started the thread - which is great!). A research group that I am involved in has installed an information board at the former Staples end of the bridge and I have met with Decathlon about having a display of information in their car park, taking advantage of the railings there since the partial collapse of the culvert three years ago. One main question. The bridge appears to date from the c.1840's - why was it constructed? It does far more than carry the former route of Bramall Lane. Presumably an industrial site needed the structure in place before building? If so what would that have been? Many thanks for the information people have posted here. Your work has been a great help
  16. From the Leyland Torque Magazine ----- Driving a Titan Torque Converter "Gearless Bus" in 1948 The bus in question is to operate Sheffield route 3, OUTER CIRCLE, a short working from Malin Bridge to Bellhouse Road. After entering the cab and taking his seat the, driver on glancing around would notice that although the hand controls, a change speed lever to his left, and the hand brake to his right, were normal, the foot controls were not! On the right of the steering column was the accelerator pedal and the brake pedal was in the center. On the left, where one would expect a clutch pedal or preselective gear engaging pedal, but there was simply a foot rest. A knowledgeable driver would now be aware that he was in control of a “GEARLESS BUS”. We shall assume that the vehicle is GWE 730, Titan TD5c with a Cravens body, new in 1940, and number 431 in the “A” fleet. The time is 4.10pm towards the end of June. It is a warm day and we have a fair loading of passengers. The driver checks for intermediate position (neutral) by means of the left-hand lever, presses the starter button on the dash in front of him and the engines comes into life. There are two bells from the conductor, the control lever is pushed forward and a slight clunk comes from the toggle-clutch as the torque converter is engaged. The handbrake (push on type) is released and pulled back, a “tickety –tick” sound from the free-wheel is noticeable. On accelerating, this ceases and the bus moves forward very smoothly and turns right into Holme Lane. The engine is revving at its maximum governed speed, the road speed increasing until at about 20 mph the change speed lever is pulled back into direct drive. Approaching the stop before Middlewood Road, the brakes are applied and a few yards before we come to a halt, the lever is pushed forward to engage the converter. The free-wheel sound is again heard and the bus coasts to a halt, with a final application of the foot brake. Starting off once more, a left turn is made into Middlewood Road where the slight gradient necessitates the constant use of the converter. The engine is again running at the governed speed, and there is a constant, steady drone from the induction system. The gradient levels out alongside Hillsborough Park and the lever is pulled back into direct drive. With a slight clunk, the drone is replaced by the mellow roar of the 8.6 oil engine, similar to a standard TD5. Turning right we traverse Leppings Lane, passing the Sheffield Wednesday Football Ground in the process. On leaving the Leppings Lane /Herries Road stop, the usual procedure is followed and on reaching the Five Arches Railway viaduct, an angler from the adjacent pond is picked up. Given the starting bell, the driver fully depresses the accelerator, the engine reaches its governed speed, and simultaneously the hand brake is released. Slowly, the bus moves forward up the hill, though the engine is racing, progress at best is “steady”. We pass Scraith Wood to stop at a point near Penrith Road and at this stage there is a wisp of steam from the radiator cap. It is a warm day and we have a”boil” on. Laboriously starting off again, we reach the summit at Moonshine Lane and on stopping to set down, steam blows furiously from the radiator cap. Allowing a couple of minutes to cool down, the water is replenished from an obliging shopkeeper nearby. We were lucky that the fluid in the converter did not “gasify”, or there would have been a loss of drive. Continuing down Herries Drive, with direct engagement, the steep pull up Longley Lane necessitates a forward movement of the lever to engage the torque converter to climb to the stop opposite the Firth Park Grammar School. The change is achieved by leaving the right foot flat down on the accelerator and pushing the control lever forwards, the engine again attaining its governed speed, stopping near the school. There is one more slow climb to Sheffield Lane Top and here we turn right into Hatfield House Lane, travelling on this level throroughfare to the terminus at Bellhouse Road, breathless, after an almost four mile journey, ready to return to Malin Bridge on route 2. Passengers all off, the bus turns right into Bellhouse Road, prior to reversing into Shiregreen Lane opposite the Concord Park gates. Neutral is selected, and then an attempt to engage reverse is frustrated by a grinding noise from the selector dogs. Stubbornly, reverse gear cannot be engaged, but our driver has experienced this problem before. The trick here is to stop the engine and re-engage reverse ratio – usually this was successful. If not the process was repeated until reverse was selected! Drawing up to the stopping place, the engine was stopped, to wait departure time to return to Malin Bridge. This adventure was a fairly typical journey on a “GEARLESS BUS”, a mix of flat and hilly terrain, having one long ascent and one moderate descent down Longley Lane. The latter feature would remind the driver that there was very little engine braking effect on this type of bus and with much reliance on the brakes.
  17. I think this must be part of Camping Lane that has now gone. Looking at old and modern maps my best guess as to the modern location is near the bottom of Periwood Lane. I am probably miles off so would anyone knowing the area and contours of the land have a better idea. I think there was a stream in the valley bottom, I wonder if that is still open? EDIT - I have just found it on Picture Sheffield, "Date Period:1900-1919" https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/303159027009?ul_noapp=true
  18. I am trying to determine if there was anything left of the Park Goods station after 1966 to 1969. I understand that it was supposed to have closed in 1963. Due to the Tinsley marshalling yard being opened in 1965. There is a picture of it still in operation captured with a photo of the Canal Basin, but the photo implies late 60's rather than earlier. I have tried to search for large scale maps from the late 60's, but had no results. I don't know if you can buy them. The O.S. site has no indication of maps, at least down to street level size, on their website. I have seen a picture dated to 1969 of the Flying Scotsman passing through Victoria, which shows some carriages parked up on the lines to the station. So that could mean that the tracks were still there at that time.
  19. The reference to "uninhabited moors" may well be connected to the former mines on the south side of the Porter Valley up near Ringinglow. As for the mines in the city centre, I was told that when the builders were digging the foundations for Chesham House on Charter Row, they found coal and had to apply for a licence to extract it.
  20. The answer is that Coalpit lane was changed to Cambridge street in 1863 although there had been mutterings about changing it for some years previously. Some relevant correspondence from the newspapers is below. It appears that all the owners of property in the lane (apart from a handful who could not be contacted) were in favour of changing the name, as it gave a poor impression of their business's to outsiders. Robert Eadon Leader (historian and publisher of the Independent) was against the change and suggested changing the name to Coalpit street as a compromise. What also comes out of the correspondence is that although the laying of the Crimea Monument foundation stone by the Duke of Cambridge on 21st October 1857 triggered the requests for a name change, the monument was only completed six years later, in October 1863. Note how quickly the change in name was taken up by residents, some later street name changes took years for acceptance.
  21. I think that may have been one of those childhood memories that we all have that get mixed up with stories we are told at the time, or possibly there was a previous model bear. There is some reference to dates further up this post and according to Picture Sheffield and the Botanical Gardens websites the bears were removed about 1870, possibly after a child fell in and was killed. ---------- http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s11037&pos=2&action=zoom&id=14059 --------------- http://www.sbg.org.uk/portfolio-items/bear-pit/
  22. My mother born 1912 always claimed to remember when there was a bear in the bear pit.
  23. Has anyone got any information etc on when the housing in that area of Sheffield was built, and by who. The area is private housing and a combination of detached, semi-detached and bungalows. It is quite a large area stretching from Abbey Lane upto the borders with Bradway, inc Westwick Road, Crescent. Old Park Road, Avenue, Cockshutt Road, Crescent etc. Any info would be welcome
×