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MenstrieOwl

Sheffield History Member
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About MenstrieOwl

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  1. Ninerbrit Apparently Murray played a few more games for Motherwell after his return from Ireland. Menstrieowl
  2. Ninerbrit I have researched Motherwell matches in the Motherwell Times from 1906 to 1910. Trust me the only Murray at the club during that period was James. Check out 'Well Again by Graham Barnstaple and Keith Brown. MenstrieOwl
  3. Ninerbrit James Murray won 3 Irish caps, 2 while with Motherwell and one, against Wales on 11th April 1910 at Wrexham, after he had signed for Wednesday. Regards MenstrieOwl
  4. Hi Clive, Thanks for all of your tips. I think I have most of the publications covering George's career at Motherwell, Wednesday and East Fife. Yoker Athletic are a Junior Football side who play in the west end of Glasgow (sadly all of their records from this period have been lost). I have managed to pick up a couple of team groups from Picture Sheffield Online but would like to hear from anyone who has a good copy of the photograph which shows Wednesday being presented to the Crown Prince of Denmark on their Scandinavian Tour.
  5. Hi Ninerbrit, Don't have the pen portrait for Murray but George's reads thus:- MEN OF THE MOMENT George Robertson, Sheffield Wednesday “You can generally tell a baker, as you can tell a miner – by the whiteness of his face. Life in the pit has its compensation for this theft of natural colour – or so an old Scottish footballer told me – in its strengthening effect upon the digestion. But whether baking offers any such compensation I don’t know. There was in the past time a famous footballer who used to work at his trade as a baker half through the night before playing in his club’s matches. But, generally speaking, one would say that a trade which so greatly affects the lungs of its workers is not one for an athlete to follow, and probably it is well for all concerned that George Robertson, Wednesday’s new outside left, has given up active participation in the trade, of which he is a skilled exponent. Still you can tell him on the field by the paleness of his countenance. There are other things. You can pick him out by the peculiar cunning of his dribbling, by a way he has of emerging from a tackle with the ball, when the average outside-left would have given up possession and by the extra special quality of his centres. Robertson has cost the Wednesday Club a pot of money. If people knew how much they would open their eyes. The fact is that the Murray-Robertson transfer altogether is one of the biggest things of the kind that have taken place, but the Wednesday have a policy of silence where the amounts of transfer fees are concerned, and so the figure is not likely to become generally known Whatever, it may have been, however, there is a consensus of opinion among good judges that Robertson at any rate will prove worth his share. Murray I can speak of later. Robertson is an artist with the ball. We saw this in the first few minutes of the game at Bradford, in which he made his debut. His control of the object was delightfully sure, and the way in which he could guide it past or over hooking feet, while on the run, was convincing as to his outstanding merit. Several times in that game he recovered the ball from seemingly hopeless positions, and as he has done the same thing in other matches since, this power of recovery is evidently a valuable feature of his play. He can shoot goals from oblique angles, and he middles the ball so well that he makes scoring easy for others. Robertson has played for Scotland this season, and was picked to play in the inter-League match for the Scottish League. His build is splendid for a forward – only two inches short of six feet in height, and in weight 11st. 10lbs”. Still can't figure out where people got the idea that George was a teacher - the Census return for Rhode Island, USA in 1930 (he emigrated in 1922) gives his occupation as House Painter. Regards, MenstrieOwl
  6. I am researching the career of my great uncle George Robertson (born 1885 in Menstrie, Clackmannanshire) who played football for Sheffield Wednesday between 1910 and 1920. George won three Scottish international caps while with Wednesday. I know from the 1911 Census that he lived at 122 Dixon Road. Does anyone have any photographs of properties in that area around the time of the Census? Iain Paterson Stepps, Glasgow
  7. Thanks for the pic Dunsbyowl. George was a baker when he joined Wednesday with his colleague James Murray in 1910. The Green 'Un carried a detailed pen portrait of the two former Motherwell players at the time, both were part-time professionals. Murray was a school teacher and I guess that George probably thought it was an easier way of making a living after his football career ended. Would George have been able to train as a teacher at Sheffield University?
  8. I am researching the career of my great uncle George Robertson, a Scottish internationalist who played for Sheffield Wednesday between 1910 and 1920. George was indirectly responsible for Wednesday becoming known as the Owls when he presented the team with an owl as a mascot and they won their next 4 home games without conceding a goal. I would love to hear from anyone who has any information on George's time in Sheffield or any photographs of him or Wednesday teams in which he appeared. Attached are two photographs of George, one with the owl he presented to the club and one with his first Scottish Cap. Iain Paterson
  9. I am researching the career of my great uncle George Robertson, a Scottish internationalist who played for Sheffield Wednesday between 1910 and 1920. George was indirectly responsible for Wednesday becoming known as the Owls when he presented the team with an owl as a mascot and they won their next 4 home games without conceding a goal. I would love to hear from anyone who has any information on George's time in Sheffield or any photographs of him or Wednesday teams in which he appeared. Attached are two photographs of George, one with the owl he presented to the club and one with his first Scottish Cap. Iain Paterson
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