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sheffsteel

Sheffield History Member
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About sheffsteel

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  1. My first ever match was Sheff U 3 West Ham 2 in 1975. The famous game on match of day when Currie scored 2 and the commentator said the famous words "a quality goal from a quality player". I remember many fans wearing rosettes and some had them spinner things that made a load of noise, you could also buy pendants from the street vendors. On my way home we caught the bus on the Moor (before pedestrianisation). In 76 and 77 some of my uncles too me to both Bramall Lane and Hillsboro. I never liked Hillsboro because as there was no roof on the Kop the atmosphere always seemed poor compared to Bramall Lane. Also in the mid to late 70's everyone at school seemed to support United. I have loads of other memories of the Lane (too numerous to mention) but a few are. 1: They used to show the half-time scores on a board at the Bramall Lane end, however they used to update the Wednesday score when ever there was a goal. So if we saw the man walk around the stadium with a square piece of plywood in his hand then we kew there'd been a goal in the Wednesday match. There was a sense of excitement and everyone would cheer or groan dependant on whether Wednesday had scored. 2: From 77 to 85 I used to always stand in the John Street Terrace near the away end. I remember in the late 70's you always used to get away fans stood in the John Street terrace. There weren't any trouble but there was always an uncomfortabale atmosphere. In the 70's and 80's and even early 90's away fans could go anywhere they wanted (apart from maybe the other teams Kop). Even in the early 90's Sheffield derbies you would see blue and white scarves in every stand apart from the Kop and red and white scarves in differetn sections of Hillsboro in the return match. 3: In the late 70's and 80's you didn't see many women at matches and I can't remember ever seeing a girl on the Kop. When I was a school it wasn't fashionable for a girl to like football. It had a bad reputation and everyone seemed to think there was trouble at every match. 4: In the Division 4 years of 1982. I remember a night game against Bradford, their fans threw all this sparkly ticker tape stuff (like Argentian 78) on the pitch when they came out the tunnel. The crowd that night was 24,500 approx, which was more than the Liverpool (top of Div 1) v Birmingham game played on the same night. We also played Wigan that season in a boring match. Their player manager Larry Lloyd was getting stick from the Kop about him being fat so he turned round, pulled down his shorts and did a moony at the Kop. Keith Edwards did nothing all game then popped up with a last minute winner.
  2. My friends from that side of town used to say there were fights there every weekend without fail. It did seem to have a real reputation for trouble during the 80's. I only ever went in once, saw the Barry McGuigan fight live (think it was on BBC1, the days before Sky Sports existed) and yes there was a minor scuffle later in the night involving a small group of lads. But it ended as quickly as it started and no one seemed that bothered anyway.
  3. Yes I seem to remember the auditorium at the Gaumont was slightly bigger than the one at ABC but there were both MASSIVE venues. When you think about it going to the cinema in them days was much more of an event/ occasion due to the sheer numbers involved. It was a bit like going to a football match or rock concert.
  4. I used to live on The Wicker from 1975 to 1980. My parents used to run the New White Lion pub (actually its official name was New White Lion Hotel). Although it had 5 bedrooms it was never a hotel whilst I was there. It looked quite small from the outside but was quite a large pub due to it being deep. It had 3 small rooms (one of them had a jukebox and dart board) and 1 large function/concert room (with a pool table, another dart board and at one point a pin ball machine) The Wicker had a thriving pub scene in the 70's, it was very much part of the city centre. Its hard to believe there were about 10 pubs on one short street. The pubs I remember are The Station, The Viaduct, New White Lion, Big Gun, The Lion, Brown Cow, Bull and Oak, Wicker Brewery (became The Hole in the Wall), Lady's Bridge (became The Brewer on the Bridge) and Bull and Mouth (became Boulogne then Tap & Spile), Pubs just off The Wicker were the Hare and Hounds, Harlequin, Midland Hotel and Manchester Hotel. Other landmarks: Cafe Madrid Hotel (this was a really run down seedy small bed & breakfast), Sam's hairdresser (the famous afro-caribbean barbers), Woodcock Travel (a large travel agent famous in Sheffield), Hancock and Lant (settee/ furnishings company), Lloyds Bank (think there was a Barclays bank too), a building called Kam House (looked like a bank but never saw anyone go in or out), Fredricks butchers, Famous Army Stores, Bennetts Fishing Tackle shop (on the side road), the tiny sweet shop/kiosk on Lady’s bridge, newsagents on the corner in the middle of the Wicker and The Peacock restaurant (became Ye Olde Coach House). The Peacock was a Chinese restaurant run by a Chinese family whom according to rumour mysteriously disappeared over night (local gossips at the time said there had been Triad mafia involvement and they'd been forced to abandon their business and leave town). It later re-opened as a very posh Ye Olde Coach House restaurant.
  5. It had a reputation even in the mid 80's. It was common knowledge that many criminals, football hooligans and idiots used to go in. I'd only just started drinkng but I was warned by everyone to treat this pub with extra caution. I only ever went in once in about 1985. It was early evening about 8pm, there wasnt many people in, just a group of about 6 young lads stood near the bar. There was 3 of us and we sat down. Anyhow one of the lads after drinkng his drink instead of putting his empty pint glass on the bar he through it against the bottom of the wall not far from where we were sat, his mates were laughing as bits of glass shattered over the floor. I got the impression these lads were looking for a fight. Fortunatey we'd finished our drinks, so we didn't make any eye contact with them and calmly walked out (as though we'd not noticed anything). I think the landlord had seen what happened but he didnt seem bothered. Obviously I never went in again and that was my one and only experience of spending just 20 minutes in the Cannon.
  6. This was called the Pig and Whistle before being re-named the Fountain Bar. It was very poplar and busy when it first opened. There were 2 entrances/ exits and you had to walk downstairs. I remember that there tended to be quite alot of fights in the Fountain bar (more than other pubs), then it went a bit downhill and alot of dodgy characters used to go. I tended not to go in after a while. Maybe it was my imagination but there seamt to be an uneasy atmosphere in there as though a fight was about to go off anytime.
  7. I went to the Sicey restaurant in the early 80's. Believe it or not it seemed very posh. The restaurant was unique for its novelty decor. All the tables were postioned in their own little alcoves or mock wigwam tents. The restaurant could be totally full of people but you had almost total privacy and would struggle to see anyone else in the restaurant. I also remember there was a mock roof with slates around the ceiling coving and there was a stuffed pigeon and even pidgeon muck on the slates for authenticity. It was like going to a themed restaurant that you get in Orlando, Florida
  8. I was also in the Tufty Club and the squirel did a campaign helping children to cross the road, this was just before the Green Cross Code man (Dave Prowse aka Darth Vadar) did his stuff. I remember seeing Jaws, Superman 1 and Grease at the ABC. There was always a high level of excitement because you had to wait over an hour in the queue waiting in the tunnel which lead to the Dove and Rainbow pub and yes, near the emergency exit doors it did smell of urine. My memory of ABC and Gaumont were the auditoriums were absolutely MASSIVE. Three or four times the size of todays auditoriums at UCG , Warner Bros, showroom etc.
  9. I used to live on the Wicker during the late 70's, so I knew the studio 5,6,7 cinema really well. It used to show mainly soft porn films. It showed all the Russ Meyer Supervixon films, also showed many of the Emanuelle and Confessions of (a windowcleaner etc) films. However definately during the school holidays it always had one screen showing childrens films. My brother thinks there was also a regular childrens Saturday matinee club. I saw a few films there (including The Land That Time Forgot). I was too young to see any of the X rated films. My brother mentioned that when he used to visit it was something like out of a Fawlty Towers sketch. You would pay a woman your money at the ticket office. ....then when you went round the corner the same woman would be wearing a different hat and check your ticket.... then during the interval the same woman would then put on a different hat and bring round the ice cream tray. Im sure I also saw the same woman in the projection room running the film too lol
  10. I went years ago on a Friday when i was in my early 30's. I thought it was like a 5th or 6th form school party. There were lots of people whom looked about 16 or 17, maybe even younger. The old stagers were about 21, so obviously I felt totally out of place. I agree about the comments regarding Sheffield. The centre of the nite life keeps changing places and theres too many drinkin places spread out miles all over the place. Theres alot of quantity but very little quality. The town planners tried to build up the Attercliffe area but now they've given up and lost interest part way through the process. Sheffield has lots of half developed projects everywhere.
  11. My brother has just given a quick summary of the Sheffield niteclub scene. Its a bit of a generalisation but theres a element of truth behind it, thats why its funny. He's says in the late 80's there was only THREE main niteclubs in Sheffield. Josephines was for the unemployed whom have their own trust funds financed by daddy. It was a club for the Dore and Totley crew, old rich men and very attractive blonde bimbo types looking for a sugar daddy. Josephines was the smallest club and they could afford to be quite select. You were never 100% sure if the bouncers would let you in. If you were refused here then you'd go down market and move on to Cairo's Cairo's was a good high standard niteclub for the employed "normal people". It was a fairly large club and you had a good chance of getting in. If you were refused here then you'd go further down market and move on to Roxy's. Roxy's was basically for the unemployed from council estates. It was a MASSIVE club (easily the largest in Sheffield) and they would let anyone in. Even if you were unbelievably drunk, under age or over age you could easily blend in. If you were refused on the door at Roxy's then you knew you'd hit rock bottom. IT WOULD HAVE BEEN THE ULTIMATE INSULT.
  12. My brother has just given a quick summary of the Sheffield niteclub scene. Its a bit of a generalisation but theres a element of truth behind it, thats why its funny. He's says in the late 80's there was only THREE main niteclubs in Sheffield. Josephines was for the unemployed whom have their own trust funds financed by daddy. It was a club for the Dore and Totley crew, old rich men and very attractive blonde bimbo types looking for a sugar daddy. Josephines was the smallest club and they could afford to be quite select. You were never 100% sure if the bouncers would let you in. If you were refused here then you'd go down market and move on to Cairo's Cairo's was a good high standard niteclub for the employed "normal people". It was a fairly large club and you had a good chance of getting in. If you were refused here then you'd go further down market and move on to Roxy's. Roxy's was basically for the unemployed from council estates. It was a MASSIVE club (easily the largest in Sheffield) and they would let anyone in. Even if you were unbelievably drunk, under age or over age you could easily blend in. If you were refused on the door at Roxy's then you knew you'd hit rock bottom. IT WOULD HAVE BEEN THE ULTIMATE INSULT.
  13. My brother has just given a quick summary of the Sheffield niteclub scene. Its a bit of a generalisation but theres a element of truth behind it, thats why its funny. He's says in the late 80's there was only THREE main niteclubs in Sheffield. Josephines was for the unemployed whom have their own trust funds financed by daddy. It was a club for the Dore and Totley crew, old rich men and very attractive blonde bimbo types looking for a sugar daddy. Josephines was the smallest club and they could afford to be quite select. You were never 100% sure if the bouncers would let you in. If you were refused here then you'd go down market and move on to Cairo's Cairo's was a good high standard niteclub for the employed "normal people". It was a fairly large club and you had a good chance of getting in. If you were refused here then you'd go further down market and move on to Roxy's. Roxy's was basically for the unemployed from council estates. It was a MASSIVE club (easily the largest in Sheffield) and they would let anyone in. Even if you were unbelievably drunk, under age or over age you could easily blend in. If you were refused on the door at Roxy's then you knew you'd hit rock bottom. IT WOULD HAVE BEEN THE ULTIMATE INSULT.
  14. Just spoke to my brother about the baskets. He remembers how you were always wary of the coins in your trousers falling out, so you'd put all your lose change into your shoes. However you were worried that the cloakroom room attendants might pinch your lose change, so we use to put our lose change in our smelly socks (to deter the would be theives), then put it in our shoes. My brother also remembers that there was an art to packing the unbelievably small basket. You would always make the mistake of putting your towel in the bottom of your basket, then when you've finished swimming and trying to get dressed the water from your body would drip all over your clothes or your clothes would fall out all over the wet floor as you're trying to get to your towel at the bottom of the basket. Actually I too remember spending a good 10 minutes packing and repacking my basket. Do you put the shoes in first or last ? and you cant have your pants on top on the pile on display etc, . My brother has mentioned that there was a problem trying to hide your wrist band and get a extra few minutes in the pool. He remembers there was only ever 2 attendants on the cloak room, one for women and one for men. If you delayed getting out of the baths when the siren went then you could end up waiting in a MASSIVE queue shivering and freezing to death.
  15. My memories of Sheaf Valley baths. The changing facilities were intially uni-sex cubicles. I remember trying to find an empty cubicle and opening the door to find a mother and child trying to get changed (they'd not locked the cubicle door properly or maybe the lock was broken). Can you beleive it, uni-sex changing facilites with doors that have broken locks, just shows how times have changed. You would have to stuff all your clothing into a metal coat hanger type basket and take it to this cloakroom attendant. You'd stuff your underwear to the bottom of the basket as you didnt want it on display to all and sundry. They later split the changing rooms to make totally separate male/ female areas and the cloak room attendant area was put in between. I remember the green, blue, red, yellow numbered wrist bands, they were the equivalent of your cloak room ticket to get your clothes back and they'd also make sure you spent the correct amount of time in the pool. A siren would sound and eveyone would look on the wall to see which colour band had to leave the pool. I also remember they used to play music (quite loudly) in the pool area, I clearly remember hearing Bohemian Rhapsody (Queen) around the pool area when it was in the charts. The comment about chlorine made me laugh. Yes I agree i think they over chlorinated the water (especially in the really warm baby pool). We all used to come out of the pool with blood shot eyes, what a sight, . Sheaf Valley was a great place and very popular.
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