Jump to content

Adam Broadhead

Sheffield History Member
  • Content Count

    16
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About Adam Broadhead

  • Rank
    Sheffield Historian
  1. Following up from you DM on "that other forum" regarding confidence in my "Lost rivers, streams and brooks of Sheffield" map... For starters, the main clue is in the name - "bourne" being the name for a seasonal stream. I believe the Wybourn brook might make its way to the River Don, rather than having since been diverted off into the combined sewer system. I think this because you can see its outfall, that tallies up well with the predicted location from old maps etc, and is shown on Yorkshire Water's sewer network maps as being a "surface water sewer". See this picture for details. The route of the Wybourn on my map is a little uncertain, due to lack of strong evidence in that area. Historical maps definitely show natural springs in that area, and appeared to cascade into one another for water supply reasons. I also recall reading just the other day that water from the nearby Manor Kirk Bridge Dyke headwaters being diverted off for water supply here. You can see on the 1883 drainage maps that there are segments of small watercourse, ponded in places, along the proposed route of the Wybourn and immediate vicinity. The best maps are the 1855 County Series maps at 1:10,560 scale and 1:2500 scales. They show the industry springing up in that area extensively using small streams of water in the area to form reservoirs (not large). By this point, any natural course of the Wybourn is likely to have already been lost though. See an image of my mapped data here. Yorkshire Water's sewer network maps that you can access at the council offices label combined (sewage+rainfall+drainage) and surface water sewers (rainfall+drainage only). Under the Wybourn area, it is mainly a combined sewer system like most of Sheffield, but there is a small network of surface water sewers that are labelled as being "old watercourse". These follow more precisely the route you picked out, winding their way as a network from as far upstream as my mapped Wybourn begins (at the site of a former colliery), going downhill and underneath Cricket Inn Road at the intersection with Cricket Inn Crescent, then underneath the dual carriageway, underneath the canal, and to the River Don at that first picture above. That appears to be more along the route you suggested, and mine should be taken as more approximate. Yorkshire Water show other "old watercourse" surface water sewers in this vicinity, exactly along the small segments of watercourse shown on the historical maps. Some of these flow down to the canal - others discharge straight into the combined sewers, flowing to the sewage works. How much "dry weather flow" is there in the Wybourn in the upstream segment? i.e. not during rainfall, but constant flow (likely to be highly seasonal).
  2. Just seen this topic, and yes from what you are all saying about this small stream near Norfolk Park, it supports my "lost rivers" map. I recall the evidence for the map in this area being a little thin - so mainly linking up tiny segments of stream shown on historical maps by looking at the contours. But, as someone said, the road levels are likely to have been built up significantly. The arches in the wall do suggest a culvert/drainage channel at some point. Or something akin to the collecting water at a trough/spring as shown really well in these photos going on Ebay right now. The same effect of "hidden" bridges over watercourses is, incidentally, a big clue to hunting lost rivers in Hull. See this Street View image showing a single span bridge seemingly built into the walls at the sides of this road, with no visible watercourse around; it is culverted and now a sewer.
  3. I hope no one minds me reviving an old thread once more. I'm intrigued about the reference to the Barracks water supply from Rawson Spring, that filled several water tanks beneath the site. Does anyone know the source of this information? I am currently hunting out the Rawson Spring watercourse; it apparently still flows in a pipe through the gardens, similar to that shown in the 1850s map. Does anyone know if the water continues to feed the tanks? As far as I can tell, it seems to go under the Langsett Road and you can hear the watercourse through the drains in Swamp Walk. Thereafter it is converted into a sewer, and all the clean water must be diverted off to the sewage works beyond Meadowhall, rather than flow to the Don. Unless anyone can suggest otherwise?!
  4. Some "lost rivers of Sheffield" challenges for anyone that can shed some light or verify these in the Carter Knowle and Bannerdale areas of Sheffield. 1. Historic maps indicated a stream down Bannerdale Road to the Sheaf, with springs rising below Banner Cross Hall forming one headwater (modern OS maps mark a trickle through back gardens here), and a pond/small reservoir off Wyatt Avenue forming the other headwater. Both met off Bannerdale Road just at Needham Way. It continued downstream to the Sheaf, but now flows within the sewer along with wastewater, and apparently gets intercepted to the sewage works miles downstream at Meadowhall. - Any info or local memories to verify or support or add to that? 2. Another apparently rises just below the A625 between Dunkeld Road and Carterknowle Road, following the curved land boundaries here. Historic maps and local authority drainage records chart a surface water stream now culverted following the property boundary lines downstream, with an actual spring between Springfield Avenue and Carterknowle Road, thence passing over the northern edge of the fields, behind Holt House School, where another historic spring joined it from behind present day Fossdale Road, and the culvert reaching the Sheaf via dog-leg along Abbeydale Road and Crummock Road. - Any info or local memories to verify or support or add to that? 3. The stream under Hastings Road (to the east of Springfield Road), making its way to the Sheaf after crossing Abbeydale Road, as shown in council drainage records etc. I found no historic maps showing a watercourse per se, but they show a spring off Springfield Road by Helston Rise. Modern maps indicate "issues" (i.e. outflow of a piped stream or spring) in the wooded bit between the school and the part of Hastings Road to the west of Springfield Road. Historic maps suggest stream routes through this bit towards Grove Road from Dewar Avenue, with a spring off Kingsley Park Grove, and another possible stream segment between Springfield Road and Stowe Avenue. - Any info or local memories to verify or support or add to that? I have plenty more mystery streams seeking verification or further information all across Sheffield, such as those that once flowed down Upperthorpe, Netherthorpe, etc, serving the mental hospital and Barracks in the Victorian period.
  5. I've had a look at that eastern Jervis Lum tributary - in summary, that marked route is an uncertain guesstimate from the available limited data. The historic maps definitely show a spring in the now school playing field, but it is much less certain in this case whether it formed a stream path and, if so, which route it took. I based the route purely on connecting the spring downhill along the natural valley bottom. How "natural" that valley bottom is is uncertain! The landscape has certainly been drastically altered by past quarries in the area and subsequently with the roads, trams and housing, which will have levelled out the contours. I found no historic streams along there, though, nor curvy field boundaries as with the Jervis Lum's source. Certainly, your knowledge to verify the presence of the spring water at that point is very helpful. It is possible that the waters would have drained and infiltrated back into the fields below before the area was ever developed, without ever forming a particular stream or valley. It is plausible that nowadays, the spring waters from that site are drained into the sewers, and don't reach a watercourse until after Blackburn Meadows Sewage Works at Meadowhall.
  6. Thanks for the information about the culverted spring here. I agree it is part of the same system of the St Anthony's Well. The spring rising in the field here (http://goo.gl/maps/J1ZX2) on the field boundary flows well all year, as does the other just in the middle of the upper field, both flowing into troughs. They are joined in this area by flowing streams in the woods on the east side of that field. The stream path I have to the west beginning in the allotments at the apex of St Anthony Road and Bolehill Lane certainly is correct, as I remember being attacked by dogs whilst sampling the water at the bottom of that gully. But if what you say is correct, then I can extend the stream route from those pictured springs up the hill along the track through the allotments and up to the old St Anthony Spring well between the houses of St Anthony Road and Bolehill Lane as a distinct entity from the routes to the immediate west and east. Many thanks.
  7. No springs shown on the historic maps here, but it was certainly an approximate valley outline, and entirely plausible. I've added that location to the list of possible spring sources. Cheers!
  8. Bayleaf - I've had a closer look at the Greystones area. I've marked on the location of the culverted spring inspection cover and the trough - many thanks. The historic maps (1850s-1920s) show the trough there, but no spring or stream. They do show a well, however, which depending on the definition could certainly have been a shallow well fed from rising groundwater at the point you suggest. What the maps (modern OS maps, 1:10k scale) clearly show are "issues" and "sinks" more or less on the back garden boundary lines between Dobbin Hill and Greystones Grange Road (http://goo.gl/maps/a6iNz), beginning adjacent to Greystones Drive, with a pond further down before the church (here: http://goo.gl/maps/YWNUh). These will likely be remnants of the stream here, which may perhaps only have been seasonally flowing, and even just boggy ground for much of the year. The garden boundaries are curved, reflecting this also. The historical maps clearly delineate a stream path along this route through what was once Dickey Wood. Another stream tributary came in from the west as shown in my "Lost Rivers" map. These were shown to then proceed to the Dobbin Hill street in the location I've marked, which doesn't quite tally with the position of the culverted spring in the church grounds. However, the historical maps weren't always correct, and there may have been substantial changes to the drainage here. It appeared as though the water could have drained down Dobbin Hill along the side of the street towards the trough as you indicated. Or, the water associated with the church and trough may have sourced from elsewhere... Nearby, historic maps showed a definite spring between the gardens of Greystone Road and Greystone Crescent, precisely here by my mark: https://maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=53.363963,-1.514864&hl=en&num=1&t=h&z=18. This matches other reports I've had of springs occasionally flowing down the road here. Knowing the area better than me, do you think this could have been the source of the water?
  9. When I'm back in the office I will have a look at the evidence I found for that branch of the Jervis Lum, which may help shed more light on it. It could have been in the historic maps, or I may have inferred it from curvy field boundaries or something else. The info about the soggy fields and other local knowledge like this from yourself and others here, on Sheffield Forum and others is really useful in confirming or questioning the results. All info is appreciated! In this case I've noticed how commonly playing fields have levelled out the landscape and drained boggy ground or springs, or culverted streams. Presumably making use ("improving") land historically unsuitable for building or agriculture.
  10. Hi all. The Facebook link to the "Lost rivers of Sheffield" map will be publicly accessible for all - you don't need to log in or have a Facebook account to view it or download the Google Earth data. https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=631965236818932&set=a.516096208405836.137975.495423393806451&type=1&theater Cheers. Adam
  11. Thanks, and yes, any information you can get on the routes of the streams would be very helpful to verify some of the locations of streams I've worked out. (I'm copy-pasting the following from my post in the "Sheffields Rivers" thread - it is relevant, but if admins wish to move then please do!) I have released a draft of the "Lost Rivers, Streams, Brooks and Springs of Sheffield". You can view it at www.facebook.com/DaylightingUrbanRivers as an image, or download the files to load into Google Earth to explore better. You should find all the main watercourses such as Sheaf and Porter, traced with their routes even through the extensively culverted sections. You'll also find the smaller streams and spring-fed rivulets that once scattered the Sheffield area, which may no longer flow to the rivers today, but instead may have been captured into the sewer system (the other subject of my research). Please note, that some of the shown locations are highly certain, some are nearer to "best guesses" from the available limited information. The methods/data used to compile this "Lost Rivers" map are: modern maps, historical maps, historical accounts, topographic flow path modelling, local information such as from yourselves and sourced via threads at Sheffield Forum etc. I would appreciate feedback on any suggestions/corrections you can make, and am happy to discuss the evidence I found for certain shown streams.
  12. I have released a draft of the "Lost Rivers, Streams, Brooks and Springs of Sheffield". You can view it at www.facebook.com/DaylightingUrbanRivers as an image, or download the files to load into Google Earth to explore better. You should find all the main watercourses such as Sheaf and Porter, traced with their routes even through the extensively culverted sections. You'll also find the smaller streams and spring-fed rivulets that once scattered the Sheffield area, which may no longer flow to the rivers today, but instead may have been captured into the sewer system (the other subject of my research). Please note, that some of the shown locations are highly certain, some are nearer to "best guesses" from the available limited information. The methods/data used to compile this "Lost Rivers" map are: modern maps, historical maps, historical accounts, topographic flow path modelling, local information such as from yourselves and sourced via threads at Sheffield Forum etc. I would appreciate feedback on any suggestions/corrections you can make, and am happy to discuss the evidence I found for certain shown streams. Bayleaf: Fantastic reference to the spring in that area. I am pleased that my results showed a spring and course of the stream through there. I also have reports of houses in the area having a small channel through the cellar to convey the flow.
  13. Hi all, resurrecting this thread...! I'm currently working on some research which involves looking at Sheffield's "lost rivers", and streams, springs etc. Some like this one still flow open for part of their course, which means the route is just about traceable with a bit of historical knowledge and detective work. Some have been completely wiped off the map, and I think I've managed to map out most. Your local knowledge such as former ponds, springs and boggy ground in this area have certainly helped to validate the route I've mapped out. I hope to share the results in the near future...
  14. New to Sheffield History forums. Working on a PhD at the moment, of which part of it is about charting the "lost rivers" of Sheffield. Not only the main culverted sections of streams and rivers, but also the smallest brooks and springs that have been lost, drained or buried - and in some cases "captured" into the sewer system (increasing sewage treatment costs etc). I hope to be able to add some maps of lost rivers in the near future, and any information from yourselves to help to verify the results with your local history knowledge would be appreciated. Take for example the Jervis Lumb stream which is featured in a forum here: http://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/index.php/topic/1026-jervis-lum/ My results have I think successfully and quickly mapped out its historical route, and there are many more smaller springs and streams across the city such as in Greystones, Lowfield, Steel Bank etc that I'm currently finishing up.
×