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Edmund

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Edmund last won the day on December 1 2019

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    Ramsbottom, Lancashire

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  1. At least these prove it existed : https://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?action=zoomWindow&keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s37159&prevUrl= https://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?action=zoomWindow&keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s37160&prevUrl=
  2. Samuel, son of Luke and Sarah Mettam of Scholes was born on 29th September 1789 and baptised at Rotherham Minster on 25th October. On 21st October 1811 he married Hannah Mettam at Rotherham minster. His father Luke was a Haft Presser at Barker Pool in 1841. At the beginning of September 1832, during the cholera outbreak, a soup kitchen was opened on the premises of Roberts and Mettam at the bottom of Howard street. The disease had paralysed local trade and caused an upsurge in poverty. In August 1833 Mettam, Roberts and Mettam were operating from premises in Hollis Croft owned by the Trustees of the Hollis Hospital. In March 1826 the partnership between James Roberts and Samuel Mettam (unable to sign his name) (Wholesale and Retail Brewers) was dissolved. In 1837 Samuel, Horn Presser &c was living at Clough Cottage (White’s Directory) At the 1841 census Samuel was a Merchant living at Clough Bank with wife Hannah and offspring James 15,Caroline 20, Eliza 15, Sarah 13, and Maria 10, also married daughter Mary Anne Pearce and her husband. In 1851 they were still at Clough lane, St Marys, Samuel was a Horn Merchant employing 15 men, 3 boys and 3 girls. As well as wife Hannah, living with him was widowed daughter Mary Ann, son George Henry 30, born in Jamaica), James 28, Sarah Ann 23, Maria 20 and grandchildren Alfred, Hannah and Thomas. On 3rd April 1854 James Roberts of Roberts and Mettam, Barker Pool died aged 52. In March 1854 Samuel advertised that Samuel Mettam – Horn Cutter and Presser (late of the Firm of Roberts and Mettam Pool Square) has removed to Howard Horn Works, Howard Street. In October 1854 on the premises formerly occupied by Mettam and Roberts in Barkers Pool , a 10 horsepower beam engine was offered for sale. In December 1854 the partnership between James Roberts and Samuel Mettam (unable to sign his name) Haft Pressers and Merchants, was dissolved due to the death of Mr Roberts. In May 1856 Samuel (of the Howard horn works) entertained his workmen to a substantial dinner at Mr Hydes’ house, the Sportsman’s Inn on Paternoster Row. In December of that year, George Henry died aged 36, he was the only remaining living son of Samuel’s, and had worked for his father at Howard street. In December 1857 William and John Mettam of Rockingham lane, Umbrella Handle Manufacturers assigned all the material belonging to their partnership to John Merrill, Horn Merchant of Holly street, presumably to be sold for the benefit of their creditors. In January 1860 Samuel was advertising for Haft Pressers for his works at Howard street In 1871 at the census, Samuel was a widowed Horn Merchant, living at Cherry Mount (St Peters) with daughter Maria, her husband Thomas Hodgkinson who was a clerk for Samuel, and a grandson. On 25th July 1870 Samuel died aged 84 at Clough Cottage.
  3. The Concord chinese was at 106 Surrey Street. The Childrens Shelter itself appears to have used the first and second floors (marked 2 & 3 on the map). The Halifax Building Society first moved in during 1917, following the loss of premises jointly operated with the Halifax and District Permanent Banking Co. at 53/55 Surrey Street, which were lost on the takeover of the latter by the Union Bank of Manchester.
  4. Howitt in his "Homes and Haunts of the English Poets" remarked on the coincidence that many of these places later became drinking premises. In commenting on this to his friend Mr. Holland, Montgomery said: "I was amused with his (Howitt's) statement to the effect that the house in which Moore was born is now a whisky shop; that Burns' native cottage is now a public-house; Shelley's house at Great Marlow a beer shop; the spot where Scott was born occupied with a building for a similar purpose; and even Coleridge's residence at Nether Stowey, the very house in which the poet composed that sweet "Ode to the Nightingale" is now an ordinary beerhouse. Had his visit to Sheffield been only a few weeks later, my own forty years' residence would doubtless have been added to this list; for, as Miss Gales and I walked up Hartshead the other day, talking of "auld lang syne", and not forgetful of the very complimentary character which Mr Howitt had given of that locality, what was our consternation to perceive that our old house was actually converted into a Tom-and-Jerry shop!" By April 1851 The Montgomery Tavern was in the hands of John Knowles Stephens an his wife. John died on 27th May 1858 and his wife carried on with the business. In September 1865 Charles Kirkby and his wife Christiana were running the tavern. They also provided lodgings there, which raised the problem of prosecutions related to serving beer to residents/non-residents, and serving beer for breakfast instead of milk or tea. On 10th June 1868 Charles died suddenly aged about 40. His wife carried on with the business and 14th October 1869 married James Gillatt, a file manager, at Pitsmoor. The spirits licence was lost in October 1869 due to prosecutions Christiana suffered while trying to run a rough public-house as a widow. By the April 1871 census, the premises were being used as a lodging house by the Gillatts, with the ground floor a grocers shop run by Job Morton. Interestingly of the 12 lodgers there, 9 were in printing related jobs, probably working for the Leaders who were printing the Independent at Bank Street.
  5. From the Independent 1st February 1873: In the autumn of 1868 an old contributor to the Intelligencer [the Washington paper that Gales established] visited Sheffield, and being curious, as so many Americans are, to see the place from which his former employer went forth, visited the antique shop in the Hartshead where Gales commenced and Montgomery continued the then dangerous trade of editor and publisher. The poetic nine have long deserted the obscure place. Where flowers of Parnassus once bloomed, the votaries of Bacchus then revelled. In short the building had been turned into a beershop. When the wandering American approached to pay homage at the shrine, joiners, obeying the behests of a pushing age, were removing the quaintly carved door-case with the ancient fan light, to replace them with some more convenient structure in plain and vulgar deal. The stranger was horrified at the desecration and, inquiring, found that the old wood was being removed with some lumber for lighting fires. His plea for mercy was admitted triumphant he carried off the old door case, and out of it had constructed a number of boxes, one of which is placed in the National Museum at Washington, suitably inscribed, and bearing a photograph of the premises rendered sacred by the memory of Gales and Montgomery. Montgomery’s Hartshead shop is, we may add, at the present time, not a beershop but a grocer’s.
  6. There is a tradition in Sheffield of "building houses out of their cellars". Perhaps the Abbey was built from stone extracted from their fish pond - see 1850 map below - was the pond to the east of their site the source? The "Historic England" website states that the fishponds were created by damming for the monks by William de Grenlyf who died in 1411 but maybe he enlarged an existing pond?
  7. Wll found Tozzin! I think the square house and the barn behind are on the 1923 map below. And the Google view shows the semi that was built over the barn (the small bedroom window is lower and to the right of the bay window than the adjacent houses.
  8. Fasces also frame the coat of arms on the front of the old Firth Park Library, opened in 1930.
  9. Plenty of pictures of the Globe Works here: http://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;t04497&pos=12&action=zoom&id=34783 There are plenty of pictures of the Cyclops Works in PictureSheffield : http://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?&searchterms=&action=search&keywords=Keywords%3BMATCHES%3B(^|+%2B)Cyclops_Works(%24|+%2B)%3B#rowNumber3
  10. My guess would be 1910 - based on the cost and availability of photographers to photograph outside scenes of working men. Is there any photographers stamp or other writing on the reverse?
  11. The nearest Barrels I can find are further south down Lord Street (no 134) or round the corner on Duke Street (nos 36, and 112). The pub on the corner of Anson Street and Lord street was the Filemakers Arms, also called the Tim Bobbin Inn ( a Bradleys brewery house). Another pub on Anson Street was the Lord Rancliffe Arms.
  12. Thomas Myers beer-house was the Travellers Rest, Luke Armfield was the Miners Arms Thorpe Hesley and Enoch Morrell was at the Arundel Inn, Ecclesfield Common. Enoch Morrell was born on 6th August 1807 at Ecclesfield son of John, and died on 12th February 1865 at Ecclesfield aged 59. In 1841 he was an Agricultural Labourer living on Ecclesfield Common with his wife Harriett, and children Hannah 5 and Alfred 1. By 1851 he was a twine maker at Jackson lane Ecclesfield with wife Harriett, daughter Hannah, son Alfred and lodger Thomas Ellis also a Twine Maker. During the 1850s Enoch branched out into the beer trade, and by 1861 his main occupation was as a publican at Ecclesfield Common, with wife Harriett and son Alfred, a file grinder. His daughter Hannah (baptised 17th September 1837), married Thomas Ellis the roper, who had been working with her father Enoch. They married at Rotherham on 1st May 1853. Enoch applied for a spirits licence in 1859 and 1860 without success, as the Travellers at the other end of the Common opposed his licence application. The 1859 application was reported in the newspaper as being for the Army Hotel, but this may have been an error by the reporter. During his application in 1861 his solicitor stated that “the house, which had been built by the applicant, was the most commodious and well-adapted building for a public-house in the parish of Ecclesfield. There was stabling for eight horses, and a large space of ground separate from the highway in front of the house, besides a large yard at the back”. Mr Beardshaw of the Travellers Rest contended that Mr Morrell was incompetent to take the management of the house, which was being conducted by a convicted poacher named Ellis. It was explained that Ellis was the son-in-law of Mr Morrell. The application was again refused. In January 1862 my GGG-grandfather, William Wilkinson, a fork maker of Butterthwaite Wheel, testified in the trial of Joseph Wareham Ashton, a moulder, accused of highway robbery in Dog Leg Lane, not far from the Arundel. The victim had been in the Arundel during the afternoon, along with the alleged robber, to which Morrell testified. William Wilkinson had gone to the Arundel on Monday 23rd December at half-past seven and had seen the accused, who left at half-past ten, in time to commit the robbery. Mr Wilkinson left at eleven at chucking out time. Ashton was eventually acquitted by a Crown Court jury. After Enoch Morrell’s death, Thomas Ellis took over the Arundel’s licence and in May 1867 hosted an auction of the leasehold properties left in Enoch’s will. These were six houses on Hesley Lane at Thorpe Hesley and the Miners Arms at Thorpe Hesley together with four attached houses. (In 1861 Luke Armfield, a coal miner from Wombwell was keeping this beerhouse) In June 1870 Thomas Ellis was still landlord of the Arundel Inn, fined 20s. for allowing customers to play dominoes for beer. On 17th November 1870 Thomas died aged 41. In October 1871 Thos Rawson and Co, Brewers advertised the Arundel Inn to be let. On 19th January 1873 Hannah Ellis, Thomas’ widow, remarried to Joe Marsden, a miner of West Bar in Sheffield. Some later licencees of the Arundel Inn: Edwin Pepper (born 1833) had the Salutation Inn on Holbrook Lane / Wortley Road, High Green from 1887 to 1900. In 1891 his son Arthur Edward Pepper (born 1867) was a painter, before marrying Mary Jane Pepper nee Cooke in Q1 1895 and taking on the Arundel Inn on Ecclesfield Common. Arthur Edward Pepper (1867) died on 14th March 1916 aged 48, and his widow Mary Jane Pepper died on 14th June 1946 at the Arundel Inn. On 19th April 1927 Mary Jane Pepper aged 26, of the Arundel Inn (daughter of Arthur Edward Pepper Innkeeper) married Arthur Nugent 30, engineer of 47 Horninglow Road. Arthur Nugent died in Q3 1956 – his son Peter married in Q3 1956 and his new wife came to live at the pub – but found she was expected to work there, which was not to her liking, so they moved to Greystones, becoming neighbours and friends of my family. Peter’s eldest daughter currently runs the Mount Pleasant on Derbyshire Lane. Mary Jane Nugent (nee Pepper), widow died 1st December 1969 at the Arundel Inn. Arthur Edward junior (baptised on 3rd April 1895) On 27th March Arthur Edward (junior) , a butcher living at the Arundel, married Vera Wetherall, daughter of James Wetherall of the Wagon and Horses at Chapeltown. He died at 95 The Common, Ecclesfield The Pub Index for the Arundel Inn / Arms is here:
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