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  1. 3 points
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  2. 2 points
    Hi Syrup Thank you for the news article clipping. It's very tantalising close apart from one minor detail the name in the article states G Lyon not J Lyon. However, the date and stables are spot on which leads me to believe Joseph Lyon worked at Sheffield Tramway Company. Joseph (27) married Emma(22) in 1869, the two witnesses are George (53) & Ann Lyon (55). His father is named Thomas so judging by the age gap George is probably Joseph's uncle. They come from a farming background in Lincolnshire so working together with horses makes sense. In 1883 George would have been aged 67 hence the article (oldest servant) makes it more probable that it was presented to George rather than Joseph, who was only 41 at that time. Joseph died (unknown) not long after aged just 44 and was buried at Heeley Christ Church on 2nd Jan 1887. So another connection to the article (he is now going to Heeley). I can only assume that the inscriber perhaps made an unlikely error with the initial on the trophy? I can't find a record of George & Ann having children hence the trophy must have been passed down to one of Joseph's two sons. I did find a very interesting post on this site on the STC and will make contact to see if any employee records still survive and hopefully will provide the proof that George & Joseph did work together. https://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/topic/154-sheffield-trams/ Again thanks for the clipping. John O.
  3. 2 points
    If my memory serves me well, it doesn't usually, I seem to remember that it was used as a stand for milk churns awaiting collection. I may possibly remember a fellow miscreant trying to get one of the lids off to quench a thirst but if pressed I would plead the UK version of the fifth amendment
  4. 2 points
    Sorry I misunderstood. What I do is use the "unread content button" which should appear as on one of the pictures below , and when on the "unread content" page there should be a link top left or on the left of the same line to "activity". The activity page appears in order of date with latest activity first. You can also "mark the site read" so that old content that doesn't interest you will not appear in the unread content. "Mark the site read" in the top instance is in the menu extreme top right or in the second just to the right of unread content.
  5. 2 points
    modern 'journalism' at its finest. Hide behind youtube and stir some s***. It brought the city together, made us very proud to be sheffielders and remembered the lads who paid the ultimate sacrifice. who plants the bedding plants and sweeps up from time to time is of little or no consequence. I dont see what youre trying to achieve by posting it to be honest.
  6. 2 points
    Hi, I have recently moved to Sheffield, and come from Sussex originally however my maternal grandfather came from here, born in 1884. I'm interested in finding out more about his years here. He emigrated to Australia after the 2nd World War and died there in 1981. His name was George Huntley and grew up in Ecclesall. His father Kossuth Huntley worked on the railways. He married a Sheffielder named Mary Jane Padley in 1872. George Huntley rose to rank of Sergeant in WW1 and worked with a motorised ambulance convoy and was in the Somme in 1916/17. They are supposed to have been a well known family in their day but that was a long time ago. I have very few photos of the family but attach some here. George is in uniform pictured around 1915. His brother Louis here appeared in a 1928 article about the Charfield train accident in Gloucestershire in which their sister was killed. The sister who died, Clara Johnson, is also pictured as are their parents Kossuth Huntley and Mary Jane Padley George was a mechanical engineer and worked out of Norfolk Row between the wars where he was an agent for popular makes of cars and lorries of the day. Cheers, Alan Evans
  7. 1 point
    I think some of these may still exist? Fulwood Head Road. Boundary Gleadless Road. Brookhouse Hill. Opposite Cottages & Chapel Green Lane. Near Wood, Walkley Bank Road. Hagg Lane No. 1. Grange Farm (could be Grange Fm at Norton?). New Trough Roper Hill.
  8. 1 point
    If it's not for profit and you credit Google I think you are OK but check here for the full terms. ---- https://www.google.com/permissions/geoguidelines/
  9. 1 point
    According to the writing under the picture it was Harold Lambert as the Lord Mayor and picture taken in 1966. The double door at the bottom when opened revealed a very small dance hall. We used to have a trio play music for the dancing after the speeches and prize presentation.
  10. 1 point
    Good evening Syrup, Thank you so much for posting the press cutting naming Pc Lewis - fantastic stuff! This is the sort of stuff that helps to bring these old photographs to life and remind us that these were real people living their lives in an age when life was harder than many of us will ever experience. Steve
  11. 1 point
    Hi Folks, Now available as a podcast. Link to listen here - http://smarturl.it/MyLifeInTheMosh All the best Roger
  12. 1 point
    Mr Daniel Doncasters Will. ( The Scarborough item is not related ) Sheffield Daily Telegraph 25 January 1913
  13. 1 point
    FULWOOD OLD CHAPEL In the 17th Century, after the passing of the Act of Uniformity, 1662, and the Five Mile Act, 1665, the Dissenters were compelled to resort to secret meet­ings, in secluded or out of the way places, in order to worship God as their consciences dictated. Accord­ing to tradition, one such meeting place was on the Hallam moors, four miles from Fulwood. It was a farm a little way off the highway between Redmires and Stanage Pole. At this spot the Dissenters, from near and far, met at regular intervals for worship. Eventually a number of them decided to settle in Fulwood, and by the beginning of the eighteenth century there was a demand for a more convenient and centra1 place of meeting in Fulwood itself. In 1707 Fulwood Hall, a fine old farmhouse now the home of Mr. Morgan Fairest, became the property of John Fox of Sheffield Park, described as "gentleman". Under the Tolera­tion Act, 1689, which repealed most of the very harsh laws against Dissenters, licences for dissenting meeting­houses could be obtained on application to the Quarter Sessions. In 1714 John Fox, of Fulwood Hall, was granted a licence for the use of his house as a place Of Worship. Fox was a benefactor to Hollis’s Hospital, Sheffield. He also realised the value of education; he was the donor of £150 for the provision of a school for the free education of 18 poor children from Fulwood and Hallam. An inscription on a cottage, formerly the schoolhouse in School Green lane, Fulwood, still recalls his generosity. 1730 Mr. John fox gave £50 Mr Jurie Clerk gave £10 Mr W Ronksley gave £30 Mr W Ronksley gave £30 Mary Ronksley gave £20. The school closed in 1875. It was William Ronksley, friend and neighbour of John Fox, and no doubt a fellow worshipper at Fulwood Hall, and earlier on Hallam moors, who left a permanent memorial down the lane below the old schoolhouse. William died in 1724. In his will he left £400 to build “ a large and spacious chapel” for the use of Dissenters. This quaint old chapel with its attractive stone mullioned diamond-paned windows and two doors, situated in a lovely countryside, in what became known as Old Chapel Lane, now Whiteley Lane, was opened for worship in 1728. A well-built meeting house (40 feet by 30 feet) standing back in what was once its own graveyard and is now a garden, the chapel psooesses a quiet dignity and simplicity. Its proportions are excellent. Externally its appearance has hardly changed at all from the time of its erection. The door and window mouldings, also the stone of the two-feet thick walls and heavy roof witness to the care of the builders. A parsonage was added at the east end in 1754 and at some later date a schoolroom at the west end of the chapel. This later addition robbed the chapel of some of its light, since it necessitated the blocking up of two windows. The old stocks now standing in the chapel gardens were moved there when the lane was widened in 1929. Originally they stood on Birks Green, close by, and they are said to be the only examples of their kind in the Sheffield district. The interior Of the Chapel has been altered several times. At one time a fine old, pulpit and sounding-board stood against the East wall and there were high­-backed pews. Earlier still, the pulpit probably occupied the centre of the longer North wall between two small high windows which are splayed unequally to provide a maximum amount of light between them, and facing the entrance doors. The pulpit, sounding-board, and old pews have gone, having been attacked by decay and removed at the end of the last century. Their place was taken by a reading desk, standing in the middle of a platform running across the East end and by chairs for the congregation. Between the years 1951 - 1957, during the Ministry of the Rev. Fred Sokell, the Chapel was re-roofed, renovated, refur­nished and electric heating was installed. Beautiful gifts of a pulpit, communion table, chairs, rail and steps, also a porch and doors all in solid Oak with blue velvet curtains and carpet, have created an interior for worship in keeping with the exterior of the beauti­ful yet simple and dignified old building. Today, known as Fulwood Old Chapel, the building was for a long time. known in the district as " Ronksley's Chapel”. William Ronksley, the founder of the Chapel, was the son of George and Ellen Ronksley, of Fulwood. He was born in the autumn of 1650 and baptized at Hathersage Parish Church on November 3rd, 1650. It may seem strange today that inhabitants of Fulwood should go over the moors to Hathersage for marriages and baptisms, but constant references to " Fulwood " in the parish register of Hathersage, show how separate Fulwood was from Sheffield in the 17th Century. William Ronksley was educated at the old Sheffield Grammar School (founded 1604) and in 1668 was admitted to Magdalene College, Cambridge. After Cambridge he settled down as a schoolmaster at Hathersage. He later became tutor to the sons of Francis Jessop, of Broom Hall. The full story of his life is exceptionally interesting, but cannot be told here; it reveals Ronksley's interest and concern for William Bagshaw, who was ejected from his living under the Act of Uniformity and who travelled tirelessly and preached extensively. He founded most of the early Nonconformist congregations, and rightly earned the name of "The Apostle of the Peak". Ronksley was keenly aware of the disabilities under which Dissenters in the Fulwood district had suffered earlier, and under which, in a sense, they still suffered, for lack of a proper house of meeting. So it was that, in his will, he provided for the building by which he is best remembered. Ronksley's will forms, in effect, the trust deed of the Chapel. It is clearly free from any doctrinal clauses. Its only stipulation is that the Chapel is for the use of "Dis­senters from the Church of England ". In 1728, and not in 1729 which is carved on the Memorial Stone, the first Minister, Jeremiah Gill, of Sheffield was duly appointed by William Jessop, one of the trustees, and it was arranged that the interest of the endowment left by the founder should be paid to him half-yearly as long as he should remain minister. At last the Dissenters in Fulwood had a comfort­able and convenient meeting place for warship. For 30 years the Rev. J. Gill was the minister until he died in September, 1758. Afterwards the Chapel was served by Ministers of Upper Chapel until 1798. Then fol­lowed several shorter ministries until the appointment of Hugh Garside Rhodes in 1827. Before he came, however, the capital sum of £400, the entire Fulwood endowment, was lost in Fenton's bankruptcy during the Napoleonic Wars; that was in 1808. In 1811 Hunter records "the interest was very low in Fulwood ". A part of the Congregation wished for an Orthodox minister, the trustees and others of the congregation were of a different opinion. This pro­duced division and many unpleasant circumstances. However, by 1827 a fresh page in the history of Fulwood Old Chapel, and its longest ministry, opens with the appointment of Hugh Garside Rhodes. A sturdy Nonconformist of the old type, a man of strong faith arid deep convictions, Rhodes also played a public role in Sheffield 'which was long remembered. He took part in the " borough elections " joined in the agita­tion for the reform of parliamentary representation, and for the repeal of the corn laws, and was an advo­cate of popular education. His public spirit and energy were displayed during the 'cholera epidemic of 1832. He preached in the streets of Sheffield and was active in attending to the sick. One of his favourite places far preaching was the steps of the old Town Hall. In later years, he had influential friends like Samuel Plimsoll, M.P., of Whiteley Wood Hall, whose one-day-old daughter he buried in July, 1865, in the chapel yard. He was also instrumental in collecting sufficient money to build the little chapel near the Norfolk Arms Hotel., Ringinglow. After the death of Rhodes in 1873 only occasional services were held until 1878 when the Trustees rented the Chapel to the Wesleyans, at the nominal sum of one shilling per quarter, and continued to do so until the end of 1880. From that year until 1896 it was closed, and during that period it fell into decay. From 1899 to 1934 Congregationalists leased the Chapel from the Trustees. On the expiry of the lease in 1934, it was decided to re-open the Chapel as a Unitarian place of worship. Electric light was installed and the building repaired and redecorated. Sunday morning, the 6th of May, 1934, saw the little Chapel filled for the Re-opening Service, conducted by the Rev. H. J. McLachlan, M.A., B.D., Assistant Minister of Upper Chapel, Norfolk Street, Sheffield. The Rev. Alfred Hall, M.A., D.D., Minister of Upper Chapel, preached the Sermon from the Text in the fourth chapter of Joshua, " What mean ye by these stones ? " He referred to the interesting origin and history of the Chapel. A public meeting was held on the follow­ing day and a congregation formed under the charge of the Rev. H, J. McLachlan. Since that date, regular morning services have been held. In April, 1937, the Congregation sought and obtained official recognition as an affiliated Congregation to the General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches. Ministers of Fulwood Old Chapel Jeremiah Gill ... ... ... ... 1728-1758 Ministers of Upper Chapel John Dickinson .. ... ... 1758-1780 Joseph Evans ... ... ... 1758- 1798 Benjamin Naylor ... ... . .. 1780-1798 Joseph Ramsblottom ... ... ... 179,8- 1802 William Whitelegge ... ... ... 1803-1810 Gilbert William Elliott ... ... ... 1811-1812 Students ... ... ... ... ... 1812-1817 John Macdonald ... ... ... 1817-1827 Hugh Garside Rhodes ... ... ... 1827-1873 Occasional Services ... ... ... 1873- 1878 Wesleyan Services .. . ... ... 1878- 1880 Closed ... ... ... ... ... 1880-1896 John Manning, M.A., and John Ellis ... 1896-1898 Congregational Services ... ... 1899-1934 Re-opened for Unitarian Services May 6th 1934 Herbert John McLachlan, M.A:, B.D. 1934-1937 David Thomas Evans ... ... ... 1937-1941 Philip Noble TindaIl, M.A., B.D, ... 1942- 1948 David Thomas Evans ... ... ... 1948-1951 Fred Sokell . ... . 19,51 - 19'60 Philip Baker Morris ... ... ... 1960-1963
  14. 1 point
    Hi boginspro, went to investigate the area of the well & pump for you. Re your 2nd photo:- just over the short bit of wall, a few feet down the pathway, among the grass & weeds, are 2 tall black pipes. One has a top on it, that is obviously to screw off to inspect something. Standing at that point with a copy of old photo in-hand, I think it could have been the location. I have left it with my friend up there, to try and get more info from the residents for you.
  15. 1 point
    Here are the old houses that were behind that trough, Unfortunately it is not a very wide view, I think this photo' was taken in the late 60's or early 70's. The houses and the well that fed that trough are shown on 1850's maps standing all on their own, no other houses on the road.
  16. 1 point
    talking of Paternoster Row/Brown St, there was another slight exposure further along, almost outside spearmint rhino, you can see it got in the way of the new pavement...
  17. 1 point
    Hello is I was trawling through Ebay’s scissors looking for a scissorsmith when I saw the scissors shown below. I was intrigued and I had to have a bid, all be it, ultimately unsuccessfully. I felt I must post a photo, as these grape scissors are certainly “Sheffield”. These mixed metal scissors are easy to date using the date letter associated with the hallmark on the silver finger holes. The unembellished letter “o” without a Monarch’s head, together with the crown (for Sheffield) indicates the assay at the Sheffield Assay Office in 1931. The maker of the silver part of the scissors is indicated by the “S.H.&Co.” but I will reference that later. We can see from the rear pivot area of the scissors that the blades are made of Sheffield England stainless steel and from the pivot front we a clear pictorial probable trademark with lettering below it. The “nest” with eggs in was the trademark of Sheffield’s Southern & Richardson and I think you will be able to “fill in the spaces” to confirm that makers name. These cutlery makers were known at the “Don Cutlery Works” from the middle of the 19th century and there are several images of knives spread around the forum. One of these did suggest the trademark was a “thistle” or has this been a mis-interpretation of the image on a much older and tarnished knife compared to these 20th century scissors. From a reference I think I read on line, technically, the grape scissors may not have been made by “Southern & Richardson” as in the 1920s that named company had been incorporated into a larger Sheffield concern and the latter continued with the trademarks. Hopefully the “forum” can clear this up. Returning to the “S.H.&Co.” maker’s mark now. The website www.silvermakersmarks.co.uk that I always confidently use for identifying British silversmiths, identifies the silver finger parts as having been made “probably, by Sydney Hall & Co”, and gives them an address of “Birmingham”. If there is other information regarding the maker please enlighten us, as there will be would be many interested to know. I hope there are others on the forum, like me, who like and wish they owned the grape scissors. Kalfred
  18. 1 point
    This is a very interesting topic SteveHB , hopefully members will add to it and it may take off like the drain spotting one did. I do remember a few wells and troughs but have no pictures of them so can I add, please, a couple from Picture Sheffield of two on Wharncliffe Craggs, a place on which I spent many an happy hour before I left Sheffield. The Dragon's Well and Wharncliffe Rock Water Troughs . http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s04193&pos=94&action=zoom&id=7711 http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s04204&pos=1&action=zoom&id=7722
  19. 1 point
    Fulwood Termius, Canterbury Ave 501 looks brand new in this shot so I’m guessing that means it was taken in the late 40’s.
  20. 1 point
    That's a great film and as I live in Kelham Island especially fascinating. About the building on the corner of Green Lane and Dunfields... the original plan was to restore it but the developers decided it was in too poor condition. However, they've since taken it down and rebuilt it entirely and if you see it now it looks almost exactly as it did before. Behind the old bricks it's a concrete structure but you wouldn't know. They've done a great job.
  21. 1 point
    Hello no spoons for me again today. Not all bad though. What do you think? The blades on these scissors are about 3 inches long. We see the "I.XL" mark clearly. On the the other side of the blade pivot area is a less clear mark that I believe says that the scissors are chromium plated.I supose dating the scissors is difficult, but they may well be from the same period as "SteveHB's" Kelly directories ad. Kalfred
  22. 1 point
    Hi Arif, That's a lovely picture of the park. It's taken from the path which leads from the entrance at the side of Gleadless Church, the opposite side of Ridgeway Road to the Graves Trust Houses and shops. It's interesting that you mention that Mr Spur was killed on Hollisend Rd. I heard that he was killed in a car crash around 1964. Cheers, Wazzie Worrall
  23. 1 point
    Mr Iossens class was in the pre-fab buildings at the back, Mr Dysons class was upstairs in the old building. I understood that Mr Spur was killed in a car crash.
  24. 1 point
    Circa 1890 map. https://www.old-maps.co.uk/index.html#/Map/435973/387740/13/100453
  25. 1 point
    Look and see what's on the far back wall, a violin, their trademark as large as life.
  26. 1 point
    Thanks for posting this, I've been aware myself of some of the 'differences' in Tony's memory of the event and of those who feel their noses have been put out of joint through all this. It's useful to have them brought together. I'm not a supporter of an honour from the Queen either and I suspect there will be the expected outcry when he doesn't, but the reasons you catalogue will be the reasons the Palace, or whoever, decide not to include him I suspect. I too enjoyed the fly past, who doesn't, and it was a great day for Sheffield. I'm concerned however that it had more to do with 'great' telly than anything else, along with BBC Breakfasts battle with ITVs alternative. There's no hiding the one-upmanship between Dan and Piers. A journalist bumps into an old man tending to a memorial with a great personal back story and bingo !!! No need to check it out. At some point people will start to get fed up with all this and the one to suffer will be Tony. It's what society likes to do for some reason - build someone up then knock them down? And where will the BBC be. You say in your report that Tony hasn't benefitted from any of this - well in many ways he has, it's quite painful to see some organisations fall over backwards to be seen to support him on the back of the BBC publicity - free pleasure flight, Upgrades to 1st class, Stars etc.... And I now hear that he's telling everyone the memorial is 'HIS' ???? and that he's upsetting certain members of the military by planting yellow flowers around it - I know I didn't think that was a problem myself until it was pointed out it's a symbol of cowardice in such circles. And please don't start me on that flag pole... the entrance to Butlins springs to mind.
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  28. 1 point
    This country used to equip the railways of the world. My first machine commissioning job in Asia was in South Korea. One of the British men stopping in my hotel was overseeing the assembly of 200 underground trains exported from GEC Manchester. The new trains were to improve the Seoul underground ready for the Seoul Olympics. Having thrown our industry away we have to import trains now.
  29. 1 point
    I searched through directories to find the information and I don't think it's online, I'll see if I have saved it. I can't believe that the horrible graffiti has been allowed to creep onto the quote in question, how anyone can consider it art is beyond me.
  30. 1 point
    I agree, it's brought the story forward to a generation who didn't know anything about it and it's also reconnected us to some of our American friends who are relatives of the late pilots. Maybe the story is not correct detail by detail but what story of the past is?
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  34. 1 point
    Fascinating reading. I had read other articles about the Charfield crash but not these. My grandfather was apparently a ladies' man and I suspect that his failing to give his proper name was for such reasons. I like the fact that in the above article, he is referred to as a young man when he was 46 at the time.
  35. 1 point
    Edmunds George, beerhouse, 61 Grimesthorpe road, bottom corner of Danville Street opposite Tea Gardens hotel = Danville Inn / Hotel Ward Willie Leon, beerhouse, 62 Grimesthorpe road top corner Buckenham Road. = Buckenham or Buck Inn / Hotel Norton Simeon, beer house, 123 Grimesthorpe road top corner of Earldom Road. = Normanton Arms And this map possibly shows a public house on the opposite corner of Earldom road to number 123. = 152 Grimesthorpe Road, beer-off licence only, transferred in 1926 from Albert Roper to Edward Conroy. (photo on Picture Sheffield, in 1970, corner of Earldom Road, when it was the premises of Sydney Green, money lender)
  36. 1 point
    The Green Man was a Public House (Bar) and ‘held the licence’ means he was the publican or landlord. 1890 map of the area with The Green Man ⭕️
  37. 1 point
    From 1893 to 1895 Jarvis Milner held the licence of the Green Man at No 23 Broad Street.
  38. 1 point
    Thanks for posting that - though it appears to refer to a covered driveway where the carriages and horses can wait, rather than the cabmen's rest room shown in the photo.
  39. 1 point
    Sheffield Poor Law Union was officially declared on 30th June 1837. Its operation was overseen by an elected Board of Guardians, 11 in number, representing its 3 constituent townships as listed below (figures in brackets indicate numbers of Guardians if more than one): West Riding: Attercliffe-cum-Darnall (2), Brightside Bierlow, Sheffield (8). The population falling within the Union at the 1831 census had been 71,720 — Attercliffe-cum-Darnall (3,741), Brightside Bierlow (8,968), and Sheffield (59,011). The average annual poor-rate expenditure for the period 1834-6 had been £13,599 or 3s.10d. per head of the population. The new Sheffield Union decided to continue using the Kelham Street workhouse and also retained the Brightside workhouse which was used for the accommodation of children. The Kelham Street workhouse was enlarged in 1843 at a cost of £6,000. However, the building increasingly suffered from overcrowding, and also had no provision for caring for the sick. In 1855, the Sheffield Board of Guardians were visited by the Poor Law Inspector for the district, Mr Farnham, who strongly encouraged them to build a new workhouse. The following year, the Board set about buying land for a new building. However, the local ratepayers were strongly opposed to the scheme and in 1856 and 1857 voted out the old members of the Board. In the end, £6,000 was spent on alterations at Kelham Street. In 1874, the Board proposed buying additional land at Kelham Street to expand the workhouse site. However, the Local Government Board vetoed this and instead a green-field site at Fir Vale was found on which to erect a new workhouse.
  40. 1 point
    GRO birth index gives did a search of 2 yrs either side of 1868 for Sheffield district and also one for Ecclesall bierlow and only this came up.
  41. 1 point
    I've see the articles that you refer to. The 58 Bailey Street family are shown in the census returns below - their name changes between Barker and Parker as it is continued onto the new sheet. There was no Bailey Street in the Park district, it was off Broad Lane in St Georges. The Mary Ann referred to in the newspaper appears to be at home with her parents in 1881, whereas "your" Mary Ann is in the Ecclesall Workhouse?
  42. 1 point
    Here is the 1901 Census for William Henry - he was at the Beeches childrens home on Barnsley Road: Here's a 1905 map showing the Beeches: and part of one from 1890: Here's the Beeches (in the trees) from an aerial photograph taken in 1935: Link to information about the Beeches (Lyn may well have additional knowledge about the Beeches): The Beeches was occupied by Thomas Collinson (Assistant Overseer and Collector of Poor Rates for Brightside, also Clerk of the Burial Board) and family until his death in January 1897, when the Guardians of the Poor attempted to rent it out. It later became (amongst other things) a nurses' home for the City General Hospital. The Southampton was moored on the River Humber at Hull - link here: http://www.childrenshomes.org.uk/TSSouthampton/
  43. 1 point
    On 9th October 1916 the First Court of the Sheffield Recruiting Tribunal published a list of men who had been granted (mostly temporary) exemption from military service. In that last was: Horace Milner, employed at S J Milner as a sugar boiler. He was 22 years old, married with no children. His service was deferred until 31st December 1916 on the basis of 2 categories - A : "On the ground that it is expedient in the national interests , that the man should instead of being employed in military service, be engaged in other work in which he is habitually engaged" and E: "On the grounds that the principal and usual occupation of the man is one of those included in the list of occupations certified by Government Departments for exemption." A Tribunal was held on 8th October 1917 and the list of exempted men includes H Milner, employed by Mrs J Milner as a sugar boiler. He was 18 years old and single. His service was deferred until 31st January 1918 based on category A.(above) and fitness category C1 (support duties only home or abroad). At the 1939 Census Horace Milner was a confectioner, dob 10.4.94 living at 38 Olivet Road, with wife Elizabeth. Next door at number 40 was Harold Milner, dob 17.8.99, also a confectioner, with his wife Edith.
  44. 1 point
    Hi all, so glad I found this site, so much history in one place. I was born at walkley in 65, moved to Bubwith rd Brightside where my mum was born and grandparents lived. From there we lived in a cottage in Roe Woods, my dad became one of the first 6 park patrollers, on motorbikes, in Sheffield while at Roe Wood. From there we moved to Shiregreen where mum still lives. Dad was born at the bottom end of Bellhouse rd. Have lived in a few places in Sheffield and now 20 years in Chesterfield. Looking forward to reading lots more and to dig up some of my own memories and photos to share with everyone. :-))
  45. 1 point
    Osbert was my great great uncle, though I never met him, but passed the shop on hundreds of occasions without knowing he was a relative. Osbert Skinner was born on 19th August 1885, and baptised 7th October at Highfield, the 5th and youngest son of Charles Skinner. In 1891 Osbert was living with his parents at 24 South Street Moor. He was a watchmaker by 1901, at South Street working for Charles. His older brother Arthur was a keen cyclist (he was financial secretary of the Upperthorpe Cycling Club in 1892) and passed on his enthusiasm to Osbert. In July 1893 the Independent published an advert selling a cycle: "Referee, Clincher pneumatic, splendid condition, balls throughout including head, very little used. Skinner, Jeweller, Sheffield moor" and in 1895: "Before buying machine call and see '95 pattern new patent detachable Brake: best value in Sheffield Skinner Jewellers, Sheffield moor". In 1907 Osbert rode an unpaced race from Sheffield to Bridlington gaining a gold medal in a time of 5h 16min. The book of 1908 says this was his first appearance in the medals. He also won a gold standard medal for 50 miles on the road in 2h 52min 12 secs. in 1907. In 1908 he set a district record of 189 3/4 miles for a 12 hour time trial, and a district record of 2h 35 for 50 miles. This would appear to make him the 1st winner of the "Sharrow 50". As well as these 2 gold medals he also won a gold watch for the best performance of the year and a gold chain for the 25 mile club handicap. The 25 mile handicap may still have been a track race at Bramhall Lane as mass start road racing was strictly taboo with the police at this time. In 1911 Osbert was an own account Watchmaker living at 54 St Marys Road with parents Charles and Ada. On Sunday 4th June 1911 Osbert lost control of his bicycle coming down Baslow Hill and stayed at the Wheat Sheaf Inn recovering for three days (see newspaper cutting. Whites Directory of 1911 shows him at 112 Ecclesall Road. Osbert married Antonie Ferdinandine Friedrichsen on 12th September 1912 at St Augustines. Antonie was born in German South America in 1888, the daughter of a widowed German Sausage Skin Dealer Ernst Friedrichsen, in 1911 living at 61 Ranby Road, Endcliffe, but at 20 Cowlishaw Road at the time of the marriage. Their son Ernest Osbert was born on 3rd February 1915, and he died aged 88 on 6th May 2003 at 23 Hoober Avenue (a jeweller). Osbert enlisted in the Royal Flying Corps on 9th February 1917. He was an Instrument Repairer and Wireless Mechanic with 101 Squadron, serving in France from January 1918. No 101 Squadron formed at Farnborough as part of the Royal Flying Corps on 12 July 1917 and was deployed to the Western Front in August as a night bombing unit equipped with F.E.2b aircraft. Its main task was to carry out night attacks on German railheads and airfields. The Squadron flew during the battles of 3rd Ypres in 1917, and throughout the 1918 German Spring offensives on the Somme before supporting the final allied attacks on the Hindenburg Line. Before his transfer to the R.A.F. from the R.F.C. his rank was A. Mech. 2, Trade:- Instr. Repairer, and once in the RAF Air Mechanic 3rd Class (Inst Repairer), His pay was 2s. 0d. Terms of Enlistment:- Duration of War . In March 1919 the squadron returned to the UK and it was disbanded on 31 December 1919. The last known entry in the telephone book for Osberts Watchmaking business was 1978 - he was aged 93. His wife Antonie died on 8th February 1978 and Osbert died 3 weeks later on 5th March 1978, leaving £55,463 to his son Ernest, who was living at 112 Ecclesall Road. Ernest was still running the business in 1982 where he was photographed by Sheffield Newspapers, possibly on his retirement.
  46. 1 point
    Yes .i think it is .sorry for the very late reply.i have just recently brought 2 more Richard knives which are only 50-60.mm in length.both are of the same design but I believe the s/s version is newer than the other.single blade and what appears to be a pen . The false M.O.P. knife has a pen in it if that's what it is.the S/S version unscrews whilst the M.O.P.one doesn't. So.my question is what is it supposed to be pen or scribe.?.thanks for looking.
  47. 1 point
    Hi I have attached this postcard which I think is of the Training Ship Southampton. It was given to me by a relative and we believe my grandfather, who had been placed in a home, was sent there in the early 1900's. I went to Hull Archives to see if they had any records of boys who had trained on the ship but unfortunately they hadn't. There was mention of some boys and I wrote down the names of the ones from Sheffield but WILLIAM PARKER isn't on it. Just thought you might like to see the picture. I watched your video and it was very moving. Jenny
  48. 1 point
    I remember the dancer he was called Mighty Melvin
  49. 1 point
    Searched where, and what I could MA, I have a tendency to go along with your suggestion of 'Smithfield'
  50. 1 point
    Hello and a very warm welcome to Sheffield History. Before I continue let me first say that this site is free to use, will always be free to use and you will never be charged a penny to use it - either now or in the future - I feel it's important that websites don't charge visitors and so sheffieldhistory will always cost you absolutely nothing. Everyone has memories - and they are even better when they are shared ! This site was born on February 11th 2007 - after we found ourselves remembering more and more of the things that used to stick out in our minds about Sheffield that just weren't around anymore. We spent time looking them up on the internet and feel that there should be more Sheffield history and memories out there on the net. Sheffield's city, culture and people are fascinating and the history of the city has moulded all that. Here on the site we celebrate everything about our great city and it's history, along with the people that made it what it is. "Whatever happened to....." In the various sections you will find everything from old nightclubs and pubs, people, celebrities, music, the football, and of course your chance to look up all the people you may have not been in touch with for years and years ! Most of my memories are from the 70's and 80's but we need people of all ages to get posting their memories The site is fun, friendly and completely free of charge to use and all we ask is that you contribute your memories or help us out with our research by posting information that you might know in one of the threads ! *NOTE - AS A GUEST YOU CAN READ THE SITE BUT WILL NEED TO REGISTER AN ACCOUNT TO POST OR SEE THE PICTURES THAT ARE POSTED ON THE SITE (it's free and takes 30 seconds !)* To register click here - http://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/i...Reg&CODE=00 CLICK HERE TO CONTACT THE ADMIN TEAM
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