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  1. 4 points
    Here is one of my Grandfather's glass slides of High Street that looks to be taken from about the same place
  2. 3 points
    I've got several locations with pictures, but never seen an exposure as big as this one. 4 lines into 2? Any other geeks might want to keep an eye out down there, as they are redeveloping it, so more might be uncovered. Exchange Place into Blonk Street
  3. 3 points
    Fitzalan Square exposed Jun 2019
  4. 3 points
    Many thanks for the comments on the maps we have been uploading to Picture Sheffield recently. The City Archives and Local Studies Library has a wonderful collection comprising thousands of maps dating from the 16th century onwards. We are trying to give the collection a higher profile and make it available to as many people as possible. The maps are scanned at exactly the same resolution as the photographs. The difference however comes from the need to compress very large maps down to a size where they fit on a computer screen. In the light of recent comments however we have reviewed how we process the map images. The zoomed image is now larger and presented in a higher quality format. Hopefully this allows you to see more detail without slowing down the performance of Picture Sheffield. We are currently working our way through all of the map images on Picture Sheffield to improve them. The series prefixed ‘arc’ is complete. The other main set of maps (prefixed ‘y’) should be complete within a few weeks. As well as viewing the maps on Picture Sheffield the originals remain available at the City Archives and at the Local Studies Library in the Central Library should you wish to consult them. We welcome everyone who wishes to use the service in person or online. If you have any further comments or suggestions feel free to contact me via archives@sheffield.gov.uk Peter Evans, Archives and Heritage Manager
  5. 3 points
    We believe we have the only pre-war Guy Vixen still in existence, please tell me if you know of another, this is a 1938 and will be seen at all the local rally's
  6. 3 points
    My grandfather was a keen amateur photographer who died before I was born. My father had a box of his 3" glass slides that I inherited and have now digitised. Unfortunately only 2 are of Sheffield street scenes. Many of them are in the Yorkshire dales. There is even one that he took in Bruges and took one from the same bridge in Bruges to prove it. I have uploaded Fitzalan square previously. "Blade forging" was written on the other picture and may be my Grandmother's family.
  7. 3 points
    Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12
  8. 3 points
    From various Church magazines. St Cuthberts mid 1940s, St Hildas late 1960s, early 70s.
  9. 3 points
    Here is an extract from the 1950 OS survey Meersbrook Park in June 1963.
  10. 2 points
    Its a view looking east along Cleethorpe Road, Grimsby, where the tram tracks crossed the railway tracks by the side of the Royal Hotel, near the Prince Albert Gardens (now just a road name next to the A180 fly-over). Revells Dining Rooms were on Cleethorpe Road and seem to have closed around 1903. Another view here: and a map from 1933:
  11. 2 points
    With the South Yorkshire Transport Trust 2019 Open Day a few days away I been updating my lists of Surviving SYPTE and Constituents buses. Below is my listing of SJOC/STD vehicles along with those of the absorbed independents that ran into Sheffield. Surviving Sheffield (SJOC/STD) motorbuses Single-deckers 216 JWB 416 Leyland PS1 / Weymann 54 DWB 54H AEC Swift / Park Royal Double-deckers 116 OWE 116 AEC Regent III / Roe 687 RWB 87 Leyland PD2/12 / Weymann 525 1925 WA AEC Bridgemaster / Park Royal 1156 3156 WE Leyland PD2/30 / Roe (3156) 904 3904 WE Leyland PD3/1 / Roe (used as DIV) (D14) 1330 6330 WJ AEC Regent V / Roe 874 7874 WJ AEC Regent V / Alexander 1357 657 BWB Leyland Atlantean PDR1/1 / Park Royal (used as DIV) (227 – M120) 1148 DWB 148H Leyland Atlantean PDR2/1 / Park Royal converted to roadshow bus (748) 257 NWA 257K Daimler Fleetline /Alexander 271 OWE 271K Bristol VRT / East Lancs 287 SWB 287L Leyland Atlantean / Alexander 293 UWA 293L Leyland Atlantean / Alexander 296 UWA 296L Leyland Atlantean / Alexander 312 UWA 312L Leyland Atlantean / East Lancs 754 WWJ 754M Daimler Fleetline / Park Royal Ordered by STD delivered to SYPTE 836 GNA 836N Daimler Fleetline / ECW 1515 OKW 515R Daimler Fleetline / MCW (DMS style) – were to have been Alexander 1534 PWE 534R Daimler Fleetline / Alexander Double-deckers cut down 3108 CWJ 410 AEC Regent / Weymann converted to tower wagon (TW58) 4624 GWJ 724 AEC Regent / Sheffield converted to gritting/towing wagon (G54) 255 KWE 255 AEC Regent III / Roe converted to gritting/towing wagon (G55) 913 3913 WE Leyland PD3/1 / Roe converted to gritting/towing wagon (M10) (OWJ 357A) 475 4475 WE Leyland PD3/1 / Roe converted to gritting/towing wagon (M52) (OWJ 388A) Double-deckers re-bodied after disposal 287 CWB 987 Leyland TD4C / Cravens ( re-bodied c1952 by Crossville with ex Salford Metro-Cammell body) Surviving Sheffield (SJOC/STD) support vehicles T47 KWJ 681 Fordson TN Tractor L42 RWE 101 Leyland Comet Lorry Surviving Booth & Fisher Motor Services motorbuses Single-deckers ---- TUH 14 Albion Nimbus NS3N / Harrington (ex Western Welsh) ---- WRA 12 AEC Monocoach / Park Royal 1086 334 NKT AEC Reliance 2MU3RV / Weymann (ex Maidstone & District) 1088 340 NKT AEC Reliance 2MU3RV / Weymann (ex Maidstone & District) Surviving Dearneways motorbuses Single-deckers 1092 AWJ 292T Leyland Leopard PSU3E/4R / Plaxton C51F (368 SHX)
  12. 2 points
    I think I can say without any contradiction that this great monument to the fallen of the Crimean war ( and the event itself) will never be re-erected again thanks to a succession of councils who have totally ignored the pleas of the historic societies of the city. Shame on Sheffield council for scattering this monument, mostly paid for by public subscription, around the city, it wasn't theirs to allow it to happen, no consultation was done as far as I know and still they sit on their hands doing nothing but destroying our old buildings to erect modern slums.
  13. 2 points
    Fitzalan Square this morning. Nice section exposed.
  14. 2 points
    1883 Sheffield, Yorkshire. Renewal of a Beer License. George Beeley, Eyre St Pub https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1883-Sheffield-Yorkshire-Renewal-of-a-Beer-License-George-Beeley-Eyre-St-Pub/392281450350?_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.MBE%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D20140122125356%26meid%3D006d32d975ef41fe88b26578eda198b4%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D2%26sd%3D372679726840%26itm%3D392281450350&_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851
  15. 2 points
    Hi Everyone, The first 4 episodes of my new My Life In The Mosh Of Ghosts podcast have just gone live. Featuring The Runaways, Be Bop Deluxe, After The Fire and Rokka, all live in Sheffield in 1977-78. You can listen on Apple/Spotify/Stitcher here - http://smarturl.it/MyLifeInTheMosh Or on TuneIn - https://tunein.com/podcasts/Music-Podcasts/My-Life-In-The-Mosh-Of-Ghosts-p1224570/ Or on Blubrry - https://www.blubrry.com/mylifeinthemoshofghosts/ Or on Buzzsprout - http://mylifeinthemoshofghosts.buzzsprout.com/ Hope you like it! Thanks Dodger
  16. 2 points
  17. 2 points
    hi all just to update the bible is back with family in Beverley linda
  18. 2 points
    Its 25 years ago today (21st March 1994) that the Supertram opened for passengers. The first tram from Meadowhall carried the local dignitaries, press etc, and the second one carried those daft enough to get up early to get to Meadowhall for just after 6am, I was one of those! There was such a long queue of people going through the long winded procedure of buying a ticket at one machine and validating it at another, that the tram left late but with a full load. First journeys were Meadowhall to Commercial Street and when we arrived I got cornered by a Star photographer and ended up with my photo in that nights paper. Nigel L
  19. 2 points
    I've been uploading my old Sheffield footage again, with slightly better editing this time. I drove around Kelham Island earlier, and linked this to my new postings in here I'm glad I found this old recording from 2005. Although it's not exactly ancient history, I was originally just recording sections of the old ring road, but on way home, had decided to drive around Kelham Island - and glad I did now! It really shows the difference. I remember that the Alfred Beckett building being one of the first to be 'done up'. It reminds me that when I drove around there that it seemed like a risk to buy there, but could pay off (as I seen Manc/Birm old areas revamped), and if the area was done up well it would work. - I was disappointed recently though, that the building on Green Lane (before the old school building - on the right - in the film) didn't at least retain the front. (it's currently in building process - this one)
  20. 2 points
    So many interesting things in this postcard on Ebay. The well known buildings of the period including the Foster's buildings, Central Hotel and Cafe, Walsh's and in the distance the Fitzalan Market Hall and, I think, old Town Hall. What really appeals to me though are the different vehicles, the trams, a Growler, what looks like a Landau and two donkey carts carrying advertisements for The Empire. ------------------ https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/382787090206?ul_noapp=true
  21. 2 points
    From Sheffield Independent The Siege of Sheffield Castle, 1644 (by R.E. Leader) Printed in two parts on 9th and 16th February 1901 Some time age, while conducting his researches, our townsman, Mr. Charles Harding Firth, of Oxford, discovered a pamphlet containing an account of the siege of Sheffield Castle by the Parliamentary forces in 1644. This gives fuller particulars of that event than any hitherto obtainable. While confirming the accuracy of the more condensed narrative quoted by Hunter (Hallamshire, Gatty’s edition p.141) from Vicar’s Parliamentary Chronicle, it adds many graphic touches to that general description. And, apart from the military details, it is of especial interest, first, as throwing light on the hitherto somewhat obscure topography of the Castle, and, second, as indicating very vividly the attitude of the townsfolk to the Royalist fortress which harried and oppressed them. Through the courtesy of Mr. Firth I am able to lay before modern Sheffield this account of the last (perhaps the only) warlike operations the town has seen. A few words on the two points just named may, by way of introduction, be permitted. As to the Castle, we knew little beyond the fact that it stood on the right angle formed by the confluence of the Sheaf with the Don, protected on the north by the latter, and on the east by he former river, and guarded by a broad dry trench on the west (Waingate) and the south (Castlefolds). At the last was the entrance gate, protected by a drawbridge. We can now add that there was a small fort, or tower, at the north-east angle, where Don and Sheaf meet, protecting the two faces; and before the main gate on the north, a large Fort (hereafter called a half-moon work), itself surrounded by a deep trench, and separated from the Castle by palisades and a breastwork within the trench. Notwithstanding this, at the outbreak of the civil wars, the Royalists had hesitated to garrison the Castle; had indeed left it to be occupied by the local Parliamentarian sympathisers. But these being driven out, it had been so strengthened by additional palisades and ramparts, and by damming up the Sheaf to deepen the water on the east, that when Major-General Crawford, after the rout of the King’s forces at Marston Moor, was sent to reduce it, he liked its looks so little that he drew off to take counsel with his superior, the Earl of Manchester. We see, then, Crawford again advancing from the north, not crossing the Don, but keeping to the east of that river, and approaching by the primeval way of the Manor and the Park. After firing a few shots from the Park hill, he sent a party of horse and foot into the town, over the Sheaf bridge but the ordnance, taken by a wider circuit, probably by Heeley bridge, entered at the upper (south) end of the town amid demonstrations of joy and helpfulness on the part of the populace. No wonder the soldiers had a hearty reception, for, apart from the sympathies of the people being with the Parliamentarians, they had suffered cruelly from the oppression of the Royalist garrison. The letters of Sir William Savile, Governor of the Castle, to his deputy, Major Beaumont, are full of directions to extort money from rich and poor, by threats, or seizure, by the dungeon or by torture. “Bee sure,” he said, “you want not any money, neither for yourself nor your friends, so long as any Roundhead hath either fingers or toes left, within tenn myles of the Castle.” So the inhabitants gleefully drew the cannon of their deliverers to the Market place, and cheerfully helped to build a battery opposite the Castle gate, on the site of the present New Market Hall. Another was erected on the Waingate side. Colliers were impressed to endeavour to mine under the Castle, and the neighbouring iron foundries were requisitioned for ammunition. The besieged held themselves so bravely, “sniping” at reconnoitring parties and at gunners, and sending occasional cannon shots into the houses and the church yard, that the people began to fear the siege might be abandoned, and themselves be left to the cruel retaliations of the garrison. But the Earl of Manchester, giving his word of honour that they should not be deserted, sent larger siege pieces, and with these the Castle walls were so effectually shattered that the defenders, seeing their assailants preparing to storm the breach, despatched messengers of peace, and capitulated on honourable terms. Lady Savile was in the besieged castle with her children, and a Royal partisan (quoted by Hunter, p.142) charges the Parliamentarians with showing cruel discourtesy. She was hourly expecting her confinement, and this writer alleges that “she was brought to bed the night after the castle was surrendered.” But the articles of capitulation were signed on the 10th August (they are dated the 11th in Hunter), and on the 11th “Lady Savile, with her retinue, marched forth of the castle with her coach to Woodhouse” – which she could hardly have done if she had just given birth to a child. The “barbarity” charged against the besiegers must therefore be either a fiction, or an exaggeration. The fact is, all the garrison met with chivalrous treatment. Even Kellam Homer, plumber and armourer, who had early in the war secured the castle (in the absence of its Lord) for the King, and who must have been very unpopular with his neighbours in the town, was guarded by a special clause in the treaty. With this preface the narrative, with all its peculiarities of punctuation, may be left to speak for itself:- A true and exact RELATION OF THE Severall passages of that party of the right Honourable the Earle of Manchesters Army, sent from Doncaster to reduce to the obedience of the King and Parliament, the astle of Sheffield, under the command of the ever honoured Major-generall Craford. (1644) History, saith Citero, is the witness of the times, the life of memory, and light of verity: I have therefore undertaken to testifie that whereof I was an eye-witnesse, and to give light unto the truth of all the following passages, which otherwise might be obscured or prejudices, by the reception of the first, and none of the truest Newes. August 1st, Thursday. The Major-generall drew out of Doncaster and the adjacent Villages, to the east end of the said Town, his own Regiment, Colonell Pickerings and Colonell Mountacute their Regiments, in all not above 1000 marching men : Lieutenant-Colonell Rich drew out his Colonell, Colonell Sidney his regiment of horse. And thus with a great deal of patience we marche dthrough a very rocky, and almost inaccessible countrey, in and about Conisburough, and old ruinous and strong Castle, where our Ordnance were ever like to be overturned. Our foot came at night to Rotheram, our Ordnance and Carriages were left behinde with a sufficient guard to follow us, who came to Rotheram about mid-night. The same day the Major-Generall omitted no opportunity, went the nearest way from Doncaster to Sheffield, being accompanied with Colonell Bright, who at first valued not the Castle; but when the Major-Generall had viewed it, he found it to be a very considerable strength, both for naturall scituation, being in a triangle with two rivers, the water deep in the West and East sides of the Castle, flackered on all sides, a strong Fort before the gate pallisade’d, a Trench 12 foot deepe and 18 brad about the Fort, and other parts of the Castle, and a Breast-works pallisade’d within the Trench, betwixt it and the Castle. The Major-Generall returned at night to Rotheram, and sent the Earle of Manchester a draught of the Workes, and his opinion of the place desiring his Lordships further orders. The said Colonell returned the next morning, August 2, with a Letter from the Earle of Manchester, wherein the Major-generall was left to his own discretion, with this proviso, not to indanger men : which letter the Major-generall did communicate to the rest of the Officers, who were very willing to goe on in tht enterprise, and to be directed to him : And thereupon they marched on towards Sheffield, and Colonell Bright went to Yorke, to bring two battering-peeces from thence (as he did undertake) against Sunday night, we to Sheffield Mannor, being welcomed and received with great acclamations, and the many prayers of that well-affected people. In the edge of the Parke we planted the Culverin (having before sent a party of horse and foot into the Towne) and there did discharge three great shot with great dexterity into the Castle, one whereof shot through the Governour’s chamber : and thereafter we marched through the upper part of the Parke, and drew a great circumference with our Ordnance, to eschew the danger of the Castle, and entred at the upper end of the Towne, where the Towns-men with great joy drew down the Ordnance to the market-place : and thereafter the Major-generall summoned them by a Trumpeter in the Earle of Manchesters name, to surrender the place into his hands for King and Parliament : but they discharged three shot at the Trumpeter, who could not get audience. All this night all degrees and sexes with all cheerfulness cut fads (faggots), and brought them to make the battery crosse the street within forty yeards of the Castle, where the carefull and vigilant Major-generall was himselfe working, incouraging others with his presence, cheerfull words, and example the battery was well nigh perfected this night. August 3. Captaine Sands captaine of the Pioneers, and the master Gunner, attended the Major-generall to view the little Towers by the River, that flauncked two quarters of the Castle, and the mount before the Gate, to the end that they should finde out some convenient place to raise a battery to beat it downe, which might be very advantagious for us, to the gaining of the castle. Whereupon the Captaine and Gunner were both shot, the one through the theigh, and the other through the shoulder, whereof they both after dyed, they were shot in a place which was out of all view of the Castle, having both houses and hay betwixt them and it, this night we helped and raised the battery made the Platforme, and the Major-generall, with Major Hamilton, went to view the Castle more narrowly. August 4. After two Sermons this day, all the people went to erect a new battery, and at night the Major General accompanied with major Forbus and major Hamilton, went to view a sluice that was stopt to keep the water deep about the east side of the Castle, which he thought to draine the mote to facilitate his businesse, this night was spent by him with great toile, and no small danger, the Ordnance were planted without all hurt. August 5. The Ordnance began to batter, which made the besieged more milde than they were before, and their Governour received our summons, and returned us answer that the Castle was intrusted unto him by his Majestie, which trust he valued more than his life : at night the Major General by threates, promises and money, got together some Colliers to myne the Castle which they found not feasible, it being builded on a rock. This day the Major generall wrote to the Earle of Manchester, that Ammunition and Ball was likely to be wanting, and the Major generall went to the Iron Mills, and set men a work to make moulds for to cast Balls for our pieces, which was forthwith done; this night the Major generall attempted to break up the Sluce through the Dams, to let out the water of that corner against the Orchard, on the east side of the Castle, which could not take effect. And this night we perfected the battery and platforme that flauncked the draw-bridge of the Castle, with our intention to beare it downe with one of our Sakars [small pieces of artillery], whereby they might not have passage to relieve the fort from the Castle. [CONTINUED] We left Major-General Crawford investing Sheffield Castle, but unprovided with sufficient force, either of men or artillery, to justify a determined assault. The place was not strong enough to hold out when reinforcements sent by the Earl of Manchester arrived, and the anxiety of the townspeople lest the siege should be raised and they left to the vengeance of the garrison was quickly relieved. The narrative goes on: August 7. This day we received some powder from the Earle of Manchester, some Sakar shot from the Iron works, and newes of Coll. Bright that he was on his march with 500 foot, 300 horse to convoy an Iron Demicannon and the Queenes Pocket Pistoll to us. Wherupon the Major generall sent to hasten their march, and this day the towne of Sheffield sent a petition to the Earle of Manchester, desiring his Honour to continue his Forces with them, until the Lord should be pleased to deliver it into our hands, otherwise of all men would be the most miserable; for if they aboad after our departure, their consciences would be over-burthened, their estates plundred. And themselves become subject to all slavery and misery, or otherwise they would be necessitated to follow the Army, hereupon his Lordship was pleased of his owne goodnesse, to take into consideration their present condition, and the ensuing dangers of so good a people, and did grant a positive to reduce the Castle, and not depart from it until it was surrendrd. And this night the Major-generall raised a new battery against the west side of the Castle, and then placed the Culvering which made a small breach the next day. August 8. Our Sakars beat downe the Battlements, and a part of the Towne that flauncked that quarter of the Castle, and dismounted a Drake planted thereon. This day the enemy shot some Granadoes into the Towne and Church-yearde, which did no execution; the same day two Gunners were shot through the Port-holes, in the fingers by the enemy, the Major general sent Major Alford to conduct the ordnance with four Troopes of Horse from Doncaster to us, hearing that the 500 foot were diminished to one, and that the horse were not above two hundred in all He likewise sent to the adjoining Constables, to provide fresh draughts to further the Ordnance speedy march. August 9. This day at six o’clock in the evening, the Ordnance came to us, and the Major-generall both day and night with indefatigable paines, did see the battery raised higher, the Port holes mended, the ground levelled, the platforms made, and the Ordnance planted. August 10. This day the Culverin, Demicannon, and Pocket-pistoll plaid at the breach, the Sakars at the battlements very soundly, which made a good breach, and thereafter summoned them a second time to yeeld the place for King and Parliament : in answere whereto they desired a parley; which was granted, and the Commissioners authorised by the Major-generall were Colonel Pickering, Lieutenant-Colonell Drames, and Major Hamilton : and for them were Cap. Heinsworth, Mr.Samuell Savill, and Mr.Robson : which parley continued till six of the clock at night without effect, but that Cap.Heinsworth with his associates desired that they might acquaint the Governour with the debates controverted ; which was granted and that they should returne an answer within a quarter of an houre, or otherwise stand to their hazzard. And they returning no answere within the time prefixed we discharged six shot more, which brought them to desire a continuation of the Treaty; which was continued till night, and thereafter agreed on those Articles inclosed, and they sent out hostages to us for performance of the Articles, vis. Sir John Key and Captaine Heinsworth. Articles of agreement between the Commanders authorised by Major Generall Craford and Major Thomas Beaumont Governour of Sheffield Castle for surrendering the said Castle to the right honourable the Earle of Manchester upon conditions following. 1. That the Castle of Sheffield with all their fire Armes, Ordnance, and Ammunition, and all other furniture of Warre, with all other provisions theirin (excepting what is allowed in the following Articles, be delivered up to Major Generall Craford to morrow in the afternoon by three of the clocks being the eleaventh of this instant August without any dimnuation or embezzlement. 2. That the Governour and all Field Officers, Captaines, Lieutenants and Ensigns shall March out of the Castle upon the delivery thereof, with their Drumes and Colours and each his owne horse, Sadle, Sword, and Pistolls to Pontefract Castle or such other place as they shall desire, with a sufficient Convoy or passé for their security, and the Common Souldiers with the Inferiour Officers, to march out with their swords and Pikes, each to his owne home or where else they please. 3. That all such Officers and Souldiers as march out upon this agreement shall have liberty to carry with them, their Wives, Children, and servants, with their owne goods property belonging to them, and have all convenient accommodation for carieing of the same. 4. That the Lady Savile with her Children and familie with her, and their owne proper goods, shall make passe with Coaches, Horses and Waggons to Fromehill, or else where a sufficient guard befitting the quality of her person, without injurie to any of their persons, or plundering of their goods, or otherwise she or they or any of them to goe or stay, at their owne pleasure, until she or they be in a condition to remove themselves. 5. That the Gentlemen in the Castle, being no Souldiers shall March out with each his own horse, Sadle, Sword, and Pistolls, and shall have liberty to remove their Goods, and to live at their own houses or else where without molestation, they conforming themselves to all Ordinances of Parliament, and that they shall have protections from the Earle of Manchester or Lord Fairfax for the same, and all Officers and Souldiers who desire to lay downe Armes shall enjoy the same protection. 6. That the Governour, Officers, Souldiers, Gentlemen and all others, who are by this agreement to carry their goods with them, shall have sixe weekes time for removing of them and in the meane time they are to be left in the Castle and they secured from imbezeling and this Article is to be understood of all such goods as are at present either with in the Castle, or under the absolute Command thereof. 7. That Kelme Homer now dwelling in the Castle shall have liberty to remove his goods into the Towne or else where without molestation. 8. That all Officers and Souldiers Gentlemen, and other persons shall according to the Articles above mentioned march out of the Castle with out any injurie or molestation by plundering stripping or otherwise. 9. That hostages (such as Major Generall Craford shall approve) be delivered by the Governour, upon signing of these Articles for the delivering up of the Castle, which shall be returned safely upon the performance thereof, unto such places as they shall desire. Signed by us the Commissioners authorised by Major Generall Craford at Sheffield this 19th day of August 1644. I.Pickering Marke Gryme William Hamilton Signed by us the Commissioners authorised by Major Thomas Beaumont Governour of Sheffield Castle at Sheffield this 10th day of August 1644. Gabriell Heinsworth Samuell Savile Thomas Robson I do hereby ingage my selfe to the faithfull performance of the Articles above mentioned agreed upon by the Commssioners authorised by me, L.Craford I do hereby ingage my selfe to the faithfull performance of the Articles above mentioned agreed upon by the Commssioners authorised by me, Thomas Beaumont. August 11. This day, after solemn thanks performed, the Lady Savile with her retinue marched forth of the Castle with her Coach to Woodhouse, whether she was safely conveyed by a Lieutenant of our horse. The Governour being 200 strong marched out of the Castle and those few (not being in all 30) that had no desire to lay downe their Armes, were to be convoyed to Pontefract by Captaine Gothericke, one of the Lord Fairfax his Captains of horse who expected them all day at the Bridge under the Castle, but they came forth so drunk, that they were not apprehensive of danger, nor capable of any thing but evill and raising speeches, whereof they were very lavish, which cost some straglers their cloaths, who went not with the Convoy. The Governour, Captaine Heinsworth, and many others received Protections, to live in the country, they submitting themselves to all the ordinances of Parliament. We got in this Castle abundance of provision, which was sold for the use of the Army, to the Towne of Sheffield, for 200 li. We found many hundreds of Granado’s, and many hundreds of round shot from the Cannon to the Minion, ten barrels of powder, eight Iron peeces, five hundred Armes, and some other provisions, and necessaries for the Castle two Mortor-pieces. Here ends the quaint account of the only time when, so far as we know, Sheffield, which has so largely provided the munitions of warfare for others, has heard the clash of arms and the roar of artillery at her own doors. The fortress remained in possession of the forces of the Parliament during the remainder of its existence. In 1646 the House of Commons ordered the place to be made untenable, and a few months afterwards directed its demolition. This was carried out in August 1648, and the material was sold as set forth in the schedule of break-up prices printed by Mr. Hunter. In 1649 the Earl of Arundel, having made his peace with the Commonwealth, gave instructions for such parts of the Castle as remained standing to be repaired and made habitable. But the work of destruction had gone too far. The ruins, used as a sort of quarry, were gradually carted away for the use of builders, and the site in course of time was given up to very different purposes, including ignoble slaughter-houses. For many years there was a bowling green in the old Castle yard, and a century ago the Castle hill remained as an open space, where the ardent patriots of the period incurred the wrath of the authorities by holding public meetings in denunciation of the Government’s doings.
  22. 2 points
    Hello The other day I was cycling round Brightside and went up Colliery Road and wondered why it was there, its too narrow for two way traffic and the bridges are too low. After some time researching I have written this short essay, I think I have gleaned as much as I can for this without having to make a visit to Sheffield Archives. https://www.g7smy.co.uk/2019/04/history-colliery-road/ Karl
  23. 2 points
    Many, many thanks to both Edmund and dunsbyowl1867 for their very quick replies. And the wealth of information they have given me - far more than I ever expected and I am extremely grateful. Has helped me with a much more rounded picture of the recipient of the silver vesta than I could have hoped for. Thanks again Chris
  24. 2 points
    I grew up on Ridgehill Ave leaving in 1966 when I was 14. Hollinsend Rec was our local park, an all year round venue. I remember the Whit Sunday parade and also have a vague memory of a fun day, with a clown and other entertainment. The park keeper (parky) in those days was Jack Metcalfe, a pleasent chap who knew most of our names. Every evening at dusk the parky would blow his whistle, clearing the park before locking the gates to the main park and play ground. The park buildings were all painted Sheffield green, a paint source which found it's way to various houses around the city! The large wooden hut in the play ground was open at the front, so once we knew the parky had gone home we would climb over the fence and use it as our den. I have a broken front tooth which is a result of an accident in the play ground. I was climbing on the front of the cast iron rocking horse when my pal Timmy Brammer jumped on at the back causing the head to fly up and clout me in the mouth! I attended Gleadless County School and the headteacher at that time was Mr Jack Spur. Our teacher in the top juniors was Mr Dyson and I also remember Barbara Metcalfe who was the other top junior teacher. She used to take us swimming to Park Baths on City Road. I remember Mr Spur passing away when we were in the early years at Hurlfield but I can't remeber the circumstances of his death. In those days the school was only on one side of Hollisend Road, the new buildings on the other side of the road were added later. My brother John passed away in 2004 and so we scattered his ashes in the long grass by the little stream. I was surprised to see that the stream had almost dried up, when we were kids it was quite fast flowing and was full of frogs and tiny fresh water shrimps. Wonderful childhood memories of a much loved park! Wazzie Worrall
  25. 2 points
    Sorry I misunderstood. What I do is use the "unread content button" which should appear as on one of the pictures below , and when on the "unread content" page there should be a link top left or on the left of the same line to "activity". The activity page appears in order of date with latest activity first. You can also "mark the site read" so that old content that doesn't interest you will not appear in the unread content. "Mark the site read" in the top instance is in the menu extreme top right or in the second just to the right of unread content.
  26. 2 points
    Hello , I`m Kate , thanks for letting me join . Although I have lived in Cornwall for many years , I was born in Sheffield ( Derbyshire Lane ) and spent my youth in and around the city . I have particularly fond memories of the area around Meersbrook and Albert Road where my beloved grandparents lived , I spent a lot of time with them at number 178 , long demolished for some flats . I have old photos of their garden overlooking the Meersbrook and on up to the park , but sadly no one in the family has any photos of the front of the terrace on Albert Road . I would dearly love to visit Sheffield again but my husbands health is not good so I content myself with memories !
  27. 2 points
    modern 'journalism' at its finest. Hide behind youtube and stir some s***. It brought the city together, made us very proud to be sheffielders and remembered the lads who paid the ultimate sacrifice. who plants the bedding plants and sweeps up from time to time is of little or no consequence. I dont see what youre trying to achieve by posting it to be honest.
  28. 2 points
    Update to the landlords of the Bird in Hand (originally next door to the Cutlers Hall, demolished in 1832 for the west end of the new hall) from R E Leader's History of the Cutlers Company: 1736 - 1738 Matthias Hobson 1741 - 1755 William Dixon 1757-1759 John Thompson after 1761 Richard Brittlebank, then John Colquhoun 1772 - 1808 John Rose to 1817 Thomas Rose 1809 John Richards
  29. 2 points
    Hi, I have recently moved to Sheffield, and come from Sussex originally however my maternal grandfather came from here, born in 1884. I'm interested in finding out more about his years here. He emigrated to Australia after the 2nd World War and died there in 1981. His name was George Huntley and grew up in Ecclesall. His father Kossuth Huntley worked on the railways. He married a Sheffielder named Mary Jane Padley in 1872. George Huntley rose to rank of Sergeant in WW1 and worked with a motorised ambulance convoy and was in the Somme in 1916/17. They are supposed to have been a well known family in their day but that was a long time ago. I have very few photos of the family but attach some here. George is in uniform pictured around 1915. His brother Louis here appeared in a 1928 article about the Charfield train accident in Gloucestershire in which their sister was killed. The sister who died, Clara Johnson, is also pictured as are their parents Kossuth Huntley and Mary Jane Padley George was a mechanical engineer and worked out of Norfolk Row between the wars where he was an agent for popular makes of cars and lorries of the day. Cheers, Alan Evans
  30. 2 points
    This is my class at Crookesmore School,1960. I'm second from the left at the top (with the lapel badges). The teacher was Miss Sant, who afterwards became Mrs Copley. It's a funny thing, but I don't remember ever being in a 'boys only' class. However, pictures don't lie, so I must have been. The other thing to notice is the huge stone columns which held the school up above the playground and made it quite dark in places.
  31. 2 points
    He was 'sentenced' to the training ship by the Board of Guardians in 1901, after being caught stealing pence at school. He was born 1890 and raised in the Workhouse/Children's Homes up to that point. In Dec 1905, after 4 years of being on the training ship, during an inspection on the Southampton, he is found to be too small and it was recommended he should be sent out to a farming situation, and that the training ship should only be for strong boys. This info was found in the Guardian Minute Books held at the Sheffield Archives. Someone was kind enough to get that much info a few years back for me. So by this time, he would be nearing 16 years of age if taken off the training ship after that report. It is another 9 years before start of WWI, which he enlists, and it is those 9 years I am trying to find where he was and what he was doing. So for the 1911 census, that is half way between and gives me a glimpse. He is actually 21 by the 1911 census as his birth register shows he was older than he thought. His grave marker is off by 2 years. Most curious as to what he did from 1905 until the 1911 census. I know the answer will likely never be really known, but it sure is nice to slowly see what his life was about before coming to Canada. Hopefully he enjoyed the drayman job and stayed on there until he enlisted, where he continued on with horse, being with the R.H. and R.F.A. as a Driver. Thank you all so much for the photos and extra digging of information that I can't access over here! Much appreciated. Here is a photo showing his sentence...
  32. 2 points
    Census results for Albert Paulson 1901, 1911, 1939.
  33. 2 points
    Albert Paulson cutlery manufacturer, 28 Sidney Street, Sheff 1. (1957 Kelly's directory extract), Albert also appears in the 1965 edition, at the same address.
  34. 2 points
    On Ebay at the moment described as "1930 pages from ledger with letters and advertising and price list from George Wostenholm and sons Sheffield. With Scottish connection." and "Pages from old sheffield ledger of George Wostenholm & sons dated 1930/31 totals 4 letters and 3 advertisements and 1 postcard" https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/163543357592?ul_noapp=true https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/163543349893?ul_noapp=true
  35. 2 points
    make every day an adventure you don't know when its your last one
  36. 2 points
    Here's a great video by a real train driver filmed by him, with explanations of the route taken this year. With unedited passage through tunnels and yes Totley Tunnel. The only time he stops the video is waiting time at stations. Things to watch for include the speed signs, especially into Sheffield. Plus how quickly the train accelerators. When he stops the train in a station, the driver has to know when to apply the brakes. There's nothing telling him now stop for the next station.
  37. 1 point
    I was recently in receipt of these photos, two are of pubs, The Woolsack Inn on Upper Allen Street and the Queens Hotel sadly I don't know the exact location but I think it may have been on Dun Street, No 37, the other photograph is of a beer off shop on Flora Street just off Infirmary Road.
  38. 1 point
    Thanks boginspro. I know Brett Payne's website well and contributed a lot of the information on the Seaman studios. You can read my biography of the Seaman photographers here: https://issuu.com/johnmartinbradley/docs/alfredseaman I think you're right. If it was Sheffield it would be recognised by now. I'll start looking at the other towns where he did a lot of stereo photography. He went to the Photographic Convention every year from about 1888-1907 and took photographs in whichever town it was held. Thanks!
  39. 1 point
    FULWOOD OLD CHAPEL In the 17th Century, after the passing of the Act of Uniformity, 1662, and the Five Mile Act, 1665, the Dissenters were compelled to resort to secret meet­ings, in secluded or out of the way places, in order to worship God as their consciences dictated. Accord­ing to tradition, one such meeting place was on the Hallam moors, four miles from Fulwood. It was a farm a little way off the highway between Redmires and Stanage Pole. At this spot the Dissenters, from near and far, met at regular intervals for worship. Eventually a number of them decided to settle in Fulwood, and by the beginning of the eighteenth century there was a demand for a more convenient and centra1 place of meeting in Fulwood itself. In 1707 Fulwood Hall, a fine old farmhouse now the home of Mr. Morgan Fairest, became the property of John Fox of Sheffield Park, described as "gentleman". Under the Tolera­tion Act, 1689, which repealed most of the very harsh laws against Dissenters, licences for dissenting meeting­houses could be obtained on application to the Quarter Sessions. In 1714 John Fox, of Fulwood Hall, was granted a licence for the use of his house as a place Of Worship. Fox was a benefactor to Hollis’s Hospital, Sheffield. He also realised the value of education; he was the donor of £150 for the provision of a school for the free education of 18 poor children from Fulwood and Hallam. An inscription on a cottage, formerly the schoolhouse in School Green lane, Fulwood, still recalls his generosity. 1730 Mr. John fox gave £50 Mr Jurie Clerk gave £10 Mr W Ronksley gave £30 Mr W Ronksley gave £30 Mary Ronksley gave £20. The school closed in 1875. It was William Ronksley, friend and neighbour of John Fox, and no doubt a fellow worshipper at Fulwood Hall, and earlier on Hallam moors, who left a permanent memorial down the lane below the old schoolhouse. William died in 1724. In his will he left £400 to build “ a large and spacious chapel” for the use of Dissenters. This quaint old chapel with its attractive stone mullioned diamond-paned windows and two doors, situated in a lovely countryside, in what became known as Old Chapel Lane, now Whiteley Lane, was opened for worship in 1728. A well-built meeting house (40 feet by 30 feet) standing back in what was once its own graveyard and is now a garden, the chapel psooesses a quiet dignity and simplicity. Its proportions are excellent. Externally its appearance has hardly changed at all from the time of its erection. The door and window mouldings, also the stone of the two-feet thick walls and heavy roof witness to the care of the builders. A parsonage was added at the east end in 1754 and at some later date a schoolroom at the west end of the chapel. This later addition robbed the chapel of some of its light, since it necessitated the blocking up of two windows. The old stocks now standing in the chapel gardens were moved there when the lane was widened in 1929. Originally they stood on Birks Green, close by, and they are said to be the only examples of their kind in the Sheffield district. The interior Of the Chapel has been altered several times. At one time a fine old, pulpit and sounding-board stood against the East wall and there were high­-backed pews. Earlier still, the pulpit probably occupied the centre of the longer North wall between two small high windows which are splayed unequally to provide a maximum amount of light between them, and facing the entrance doors. The pulpit, sounding-board, and old pews have gone, having been attacked by decay and removed at the end of the last century. Their place was taken by a reading desk, standing in the middle of a platform running across the East end and by chairs for the congregation. Between the years 1951 - 1957, during the Ministry of the Rev. Fred Sokell, the Chapel was re-roofed, renovated, refur­nished and electric heating was installed. Beautiful gifts of a pulpit, communion table, chairs, rail and steps, also a porch and doors all in solid Oak with blue velvet curtains and carpet, have created an interior for worship in keeping with the exterior of the beauti­ful yet simple and dignified old building. Today, known as Fulwood Old Chapel, the building was for a long time. known in the district as " Ronksley's Chapel”. William Ronksley, the founder of the Chapel, was the son of George and Ellen Ronksley, of Fulwood. He was born in the autumn of 1650 and baptized at Hathersage Parish Church on November 3rd, 1650. It may seem strange today that inhabitants of Fulwood should go over the moors to Hathersage for marriages and baptisms, but constant references to " Fulwood " in the parish register of Hathersage, show how separate Fulwood was from Sheffield in the 17th Century. William Ronksley was educated at the old Sheffield Grammar School (founded 1604) and in 1668 was admitted to Magdalene College, Cambridge. After Cambridge he settled down as a schoolmaster at Hathersage. He later became tutor to the sons of Francis Jessop, of Broom Hall. The full story of his life is exceptionally interesting, but cannot be told here; it reveals Ronksley's interest and concern for William Bagshaw, who was ejected from his living under the Act of Uniformity and who travelled tirelessly and preached extensively. He founded most of the early Nonconformist congregations, and rightly earned the name of "The Apostle of the Peak". Ronksley was keenly aware of the disabilities under which Dissenters in the Fulwood district had suffered earlier, and under which, in a sense, they still suffered, for lack of a proper house of meeting. So it was that, in his will, he provided for the building by which he is best remembered. Ronksley's will forms, in effect, the trust deed of the Chapel. It is clearly free from any doctrinal clauses. Its only stipulation is that the Chapel is for the use of "Dis­senters from the Church of England ". In 1728, and not in 1729 which is carved on the Memorial Stone, the first Minister, Jeremiah Gill, of Sheffield was duly appointed by William Jessop, one of the trustees, and it was arranged that the interest of the endowment left by the founder should be paid to him half-yearly as long as he should remain minister. At last the Dissenters in Fulwood had a comfort­able and convenient meeting place for warship. For 30 years the Rev. J. Gill was the minister until he died in September, 1758. Afterwards the Chapel was served by Ministers of Upper Chapel until 1798. Then fol­lowed several shorter ministries until the appointment of Hugh Garside Rhodes in 1827. Before he came, however, the capital sum of £400, the entire Fulwood endowment, was lost in Fenton's bankruptcy during the Napoleonic Wars; that was in 1808. In 1811 Hunter records "the interest was very low in Fulwood ". A part of the Congregation wished for an Orthodox minister, the trustees and others of the congregation were of a different opinion. This pro­duced division and many unpleasant circumstances. However, by 1827 a fresh page in the history of Fulwood Old Chapel, and its longest ministry, opens with the appointment of Hugh Garside Rhodes. A sturdy Nonconformist of the old type, a man of strong faith arid deep convictions, Rhodes also played a public role in Sheffield 'which was long remembered. He took part in the " borough elections " joined in the agita­tion for the reform of parliamentary representation, and for the repeal of the corn laws, and was an advo­cate of popular education. His public spirit and energy were displayed during the 'cholera epidemic of 1832. He preached in the streets of Sheffield and was active in attending to the sick. One of his favourite places far preaching was the steps of the old Town Hall. In later years, he had influential friends like Samuel Plimsoll, M.P., of Whiteley Wood Hall, whose one-day-old daughter he buried in July, 1865, in the chapel yard. He was also instrumental in collecting sufficient money to build the little chapel near the Norfolk Arms Hotel., Ringinglow. After the death of Rhodes in 1873 only occasional services were held until 1878 when the Trustees rented the Chapel to the Wesleyans, at the nominal sum of one shilling per quarter, and continued to do so until the end of 1880. From that year until 1896 it was closed, and during that period it fell into decay. From 1899 to 1934 Congregationalists leased the Chapel from the Trustees. On the expiry of the lease in 1934, it was decided to re-open the Chapel as a Unitarian place of worship. Electric light was installed and the building repaired and redecorated. Sunday morning, the 6th of May, 1934, saw the little Chapel filled for the Re-opening Service, conducted by the Rev. H. J. McLachlan, M.A., B.D., Assistant Minister of Upper Chapel, Norfolk Street, Sheffield. The Rev. Alfred Hall, M.A., D.D., Minister of Upper Chapel, preached the Sermon from the Text in the fourth chapter of Joshua, " What mean ye by these stones ? " He referred to the interesting origin and history of the Chapel. A public meeting was held on the follow­ing day and a congregation formed under the charge of the Rev. H, J. McLachlan. Since that date, regular morning services have been held. In April, 1937, the Congregation sought and obtained official recognition as an affiliated Congregation to the General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches. Ministers of Fulwood Old Chapel Jeremiah Gill ... ... ... ... 1728-1758 Ministers of Upper Chapel John Dickinson .. ... ... 1758-1780 Joseph Evans ... ... ... 1758- 1798 Benjamin Naylor ... ... . .. 1780-1798 Joseph Ramsblottom ... ... ... 179,8- 1802 William Whitelegge ... ... ... 1803-1810 Gilbert William Elliott ... ... ... 1811-1812 Students ... ... ... ... ... 1812-1817 John Macdonald ... ... ... 1817-1827 Hugh Garside Rhodes ... ... ... 1827-1873 Occasional Services ... ... ... 1873- 1878 Wesleyan Services .. . ... ... 1878- 1880 Closed ... ... ... ... ... 1880-1896 John Manning, M.A., and John Ellis ... 1896-1898 Congregational Services ... ... 1899-1934 Re-opened for Unitarian Services May 6th 1934 Herbert John McLachlan, M.A:, B.D. 1934-1937 David Thomas Evans ... ... ... 1937-1941 Philip Noble TindaIl, M.A., B.D, ... 1942- 1948 David Thomas Evans ... ... ... 1948-1951 Fred Sokell . ... . 19,51 - 19'60 Philip Baker Morris ... ... ... 1960-1963
  40. 1 point
    This picture is of my father, Cyril Russell (later an arts and crafts teacher at Myers Grove), and his youngest sister, my aunt Alice Russell (later Linley), probably around 1946 when my father was on leave from the army. I have assumed it is at Forge Dam, though in those days municipal rowing lakes were a plenty. He'd have been about 25 at the time and had survived North Africa and the Italian landings. He went back to Italy and Yugoslavia and spent the next three years taking up mine fields in his role as a Royal Engineers Sapper.
  41. 1 point
    Another part of the junction is exposed. It's the part in red
  42. 1 point
    Here are the old houses that were behind that trough, Unfortunately it is not a very wide view, I think this photo' was taken in the late 60's or early 70's. The houses and the well that fed that trough are shown on 1850's maps standing all on their own, no other houses on the road.
  43. 1 point
    "where is the site that this is from please?" The map can be found here "Os Maps Of Sheffield And District (1950's) - Over 300 Of Them"
  44. 1 point
    Topic here ---------- https://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/topic/14851-tenter-street-tram-depot/ ----------- and here -------- https://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/topic/12616-tenter-street-depot-38-townhead-street-garage-official-opening/?tab=comments#comment-105275 ------------ about Tenter Street
  45. 1 point
    Hello no spoons for me again today. Not all bad though. What do you think? The blades on these scissors are about 3 inches long. We see the "I.XL" mark clearly. On the the other side of the blade pivot area is a less clear mark that I believe says that the scissors are chromium plated.I supose dating the scissors is difficult, but they may well be from the same period as "SteveHB's" Kelly directories ad. Kalfred
  46. 1 point
    A few snippets 1911 October 1919 November 1919 September 1921 December 1921 1929 Februray 1950
  47. 1 point
  48. 1 point
    From 1893 to 1895 Jarvis Milner held the licence of the Green Man at No 23 Broad Street.
  49. 1 point
    To begin at the beginning: Official opening of Tenter Street tram depot and the new Townhead Street Bus Garage It occupied the whole of a site bounded by Tenter Street, Hawley Street and Lee Croft. The tram entrance was at the junction of Tenter Street and Silver Street Head. Although the official opening was in September 1929, Kenneth Gandy (in Sheffield Corporation Tramways - ISBN 0 86321 032 5) has the first date of use as 23rd October 1928. It remained in use as a tram depot until the last day of service in October 1960. The bus garage survived as such until 1968. The site can be seen on Map 3
  50. 1 point
    One of the 3 out of 19 built Class 02 shunters that were still in service in 1974. This is 02 004, the others were 001 and 003.
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