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  1. 5 points
    Hi all, so glad I found this site, so much history in one place. I was born at walkley in 65, moved to Bubwith rd Brightside where my mum was born and grandparents lived. From there we lived in a cottage in Roe Woods, my dad became one of the first 6 park patrollers, on motorbikes, in Sheffield while at Roe Wood. From there we moved to Shiregreen where mum still lives. Dad was born at the bottom end of Bellhouse rd. Have lived in a few places in Sheffield and now 20 years in Chesterfield. Looking forward to reading lots more and to dig up some of my own memories and photos to share with everyone. :-))
  2. 4 points
    Here is one of my Grandfather's glass slides of High Street that looks to be taken from about the same place
  3. 4 points
    Last year's thread and I rediscovered this 35mm slide which seems to fit appropriately into this one.Taken in June 1963 when rear loaders were favourite and steam locos much in evidence at Midland Station.
  4. 3 points
    In preparedness' for the South Yorkshire Transport Trust Open Day on Sunday I have been updating my lists of surviving buses with a local connection. Having now found away to convert and save these in a compatible format for this forum I can now make these available. The first can be found below and lists the survivors that were once in the fleets of Sheffield Transport Department / Joint Omnibus Committee,
  5. 3 points
    I've got several locations with pictures, but never seen an exposure as big as this one. 4 lines into 2? Any other geeks might want to keep an eye out down there, as they are redeveloping it, so more might be uncovered. Exchange Place into Blonk Street
  6. 3 points
    Fitzalan Square exposed Jun 2019
  7. 3 points
    Many thanks for the comments on the maps we have been uploading to Picture Sheffield recently. The City Archives and Local Studies Library has a wonderful collection comprising thousands of maps dating from the 16th century onwards. We are trying to give the collection a higher profile and make it available to as many people as possible. The maps are scanned at exactly the same resolution as the photographs. The difference however comes from the need to compress very large maps down to a size where they fit on a computer screen. In the light of recent comments however we have reviewed how we process the map images. The zoomed image is now larger and presented in a higher quality format. Hopefully this allows you to see more detail without slowing down the performance of Picture Sheffield. We are currently working our way through all of the map images on Picture Sheffield to improve them. The series prefixed ‘arc’ is complete. The other main set of maps (prefixed ‘y’) should be complete within a few weeks. As well as viewing the maps on Picture Sheffield the originals remain available at the City Archives and at the Local Studies Library in the Central Library should you wish to consult them. We welcome everyone who wishes to use the service in person or online. If you have any further comments or suggestions feel free to contact me via archives@sheffield.gov.uk Peter Evans, Archives and Heritage Manager
  8. 3 points
    We believe we have the only pre-war Guy Vixen still in existence, please tell me if you know of another, this is a 1938 and will be seen at all the local rally's
  9. 3 points
    My grandfather was a keen amateur photographer who died before I was born. My father had a box of his 3" glass slides that I inherited and have now digitised. Unfortunately only 2 are of Sheffield street scenes. Many of them are in the Yorkshire dales. There is even one that he took in Bruges and took one from the same bridge in Bruges to prove it. I have uploaded Fitzalan square previously. "Blade forging" was written on the other picture and may be my Grandmother's family.
  10. 3 points
    Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12
  11. 3 points
    Hello , I`m Kate , thanks for letting me join . Although I have lived in Cornwall for many years , I was born in Sheffield ( Derbyshire Lane ) and spent my youth in and around the city . I have particularly fond memories of the area around Meersbrook and Albert Road where my beloved grandparents lived , I spent a lot of time with them at number 178 , long demolished for some flats . I have old photos of their garden overlooking the Meersbrook and on up to the park , but sadly no one in the family has any photos of the front of the terrace on Albert Road . I would dearly love to visit Sheffield again but my husbands health is not good so I content myself with memories !
  12. 3 points
    From various Church magazines. St Cuthberts mid 1940s, St Hildas late 1960s, early 70s.
  13. 3 points
    Here is an extract from the 1950 OS survey Meersbrook Park in June 1963.
  14. 3 points
    Well, that was a ride out! Four hours driving to Lowestoft to see 513 in the flesh. I saw her at Beamish over 20 years ago and after our recent trips to Crich, thought we could have a ride to Lowestoft today to see the other surviving Roberts Car. Didnt look that far on the map! Carlton Colville museum is a lovely place, compact, but with a number of things to see...some a little careworn perhaps, but just enough for an afternoon out....if you’re in the area, that is, I’m not sure I’d do the drive down there again just for the day! Compared to the almost pristine condition of 510, 513 seems to have had a much harder life, is now looking a little tired and looks to need a bit of tlc. Apparently still owned by Beamish, given that they are building a 1950’s area at their site in the North East at the moment, I wonder if 513 will be heading north some time soon? Have attached some pictures of 513 and one of 510 for comparison.
  15. 3 points
    Finally! I found an image showing the building that was shown on the far left of the original photograph. The white gable end with the double chimney appears to be connected with the Abbeydale Mill. At least I think that’s what the signage above the door reads? So, I believe this is the building that was shown with the purple circle in my earlier photo. http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;u03677&action=zoom&pos=6&id=38830&continueUrl= Some more images of the area, in both directions, in different decades.... http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12848&action=zoom&pos=41&id=15752&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12951&action=zoom&pos=43&id=15850&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s16449&action=zoom&pos=48&id=19166&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12850&action=zoom&pos=57&id=15754&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;w00051&pos=7&action=zoom&id=45420
  16. 3 points
    Made in Great Britain, BBC2, Series exploring how the craft and manufacturing skills have shaped Great Britain Friday 26th October, 2100 hrs. run time, 59 minutes . Episode 1 https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bpz4ks The makers experience Sheffield's transformation into an industrial powerhouse known as 'Steel City', famous throughout the world for making high quality steel and cutlery. In this episode, four craft-makers experience Sheffield's rapid transformation from a rural market town to an industrial powerhouse that built modern Britain known as 'Steel City'. Sheffield became famous throughout the world for making high quality steel blades and cutlery. Steph McGovern takes them through the ages and they are guided by local Sheffield cutler Corin Mellor. Starting in the 18th century, they are tasked with hand forging a scythe at Abbeydale Works. This farming tool found recent fame when used by a shirtless Poldark, but the makers discover it was one of Sheffield's biggest exports that launched Britain's steel industry. The process proves to be a hugely physical challenge. Next, they step into the heart of a Victorian production line to make cutlery stamped with the fashionable King's Pattern. Steph learns that the extravagant Victorian middle class had a different piece of cutlery for every type of food. They prepare the knives, forks and spoons ready for electroplating - 'blinging' up the cutlery by covering it in silver. The biggest innovations are yet to come. Travelling forward to the start of the 20th century, the makers learn that stainless steel was discovered in Sheffield, bringing affordable cutlery to the masses. They experience Sheffield's transformation into a war machine to defend Britain - making WWII Commando Knives using a heavy duty drop stamp. Now in the 21st century, Corin Mellor takes the makers to his state-of-the-art factory, David Mellor Design. Here, they make high-end stainless steel forks from one of factory's bestselling ranges. With the city's focus on quality rather than quantity, the craft-makers discover that Sheffield's historic cutlery industry is still thriving.
  17. 3 points
    I think this answers the question - Woodbourn Hotel FC - lots of press cuttings to piece the story together.
  18. 3 points
    I may be my age but to me "then" usually looks better than "now".
  19. 3 points
    Sheffield Council Planning Department want shooting for what they've done to The Moorfoot. I grew up in a little house just across the road from The S & E Co-op or The Arcade as it was known as. The 50s and the 60s it was a vibrant and bustling area from the town hall all the way down. It's an absolute crime and I could weep when I see what it's like today.
  20. 3 points
    Before 513 went to Lowestoft she was in Blackpool. Here she is on 24 Sep 2010, a great ride from Pleasure Beach to Bispham and back.
  21. 3 points
    A few random shots from EATM, today.
  22. 3 points
    This is a Crookes one, courtesy Tom Robinson, Sheffield Transport Study Group
  23. 3 points
    Visited Black Swan Walk just off Fargate in Sheffield City Centre Very curious little place anyone else been down here?
  24. 3 points
    Some nice aerial photos from 1949, showing views of the station and underpass / subway...
  25. 3 points
    For your information the letters on the bridge BB & JH refer to Benjamin Blonk and John Huntsman. Blonk Street was so called because when it was made the "tilt" shown on the map on the river side of Blonk St.was "The Wicker ***" belonging to the Blonk Family. On the other side of Blonk St. was "The Wicker Wheel" also belonging to the Blonk Family. You will also see a third grinding shop belonging to the Blonks at the end of the dam to the right of "Blonk Island". Later on John Huntsman had a Huntsman Melting Furnace at the end of the Wicker Tilt building. If you look through the large window nearest to Blonk Bridge you will see the chimney of the Huntsman furnace preserved as a monument. Remember the old Sheffield saying "Down T'Wicker were t'water goes o'er t'weir" the weir on the upstream side of Ladys Bridge diverted water to the Wicker Tilt and Wicker Wheel. I learnt all about this by carrying out research for descendants of this branch of the Blonk family who live in Australia. My Blonk family come from a later branch of the Blonk family
  26. 3 points
    Quote from Picture Sheffield, ------- " The development was built 1899-1900 for John Henry Bryars, an animal breeder & vet. Royal Exchange Buildings comprised 20 two bedroomed flats, houses for the veterinary surgeon & groom; shops;veterinary surgery and dogs home. Castle House belonged to the Veterinary Surgeon. Further along a multi-storey stables with iron frame and internal ramps for access. In 1931 the stables were converted to a pea-canning factory for Batchelors and later occupied by Hancock & Lant Ltd., furniture store. See: Pevsner Architectural Guides, Sheffield, Ruth Harman & John Minnis Ref: 720.94274 S " http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;C03394&pos=50&action=zoom&id=3636 and the buildings are on the British Listed Buildings site here ------- https://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101246501-royal-exchange-buildings-and-adjoining-castle-house-city-ward
  27. 3 points
    I've read somewhere that the flats that face Lady's bridge and Nursery Street were originally called Castle House, the windows just above the river was where the dogs were kept when it was a Dogs Home when it re-located there from the Pond Street area in c1900 I think , it wasn't used for long as it was always damp because of the river often flooding the place. The ornamental front door was the entrance and you can still make out the name. At the end of the walk on Blonk Street bridge you can see the initials of one of the men who ran the stables there plus possibly the vets initials too, the chap that owned and ran the stables also had stabling and shoeing available at 30-36 Burton Road now known as the Yellow Arch Recording Studios but the Horseshoe above the arch tells just what it was .
  28. 3 points
    Any current or ex BB members on here? I was in 53rd at Grimesthorpe Wesleyan Reform Chapel as Life Boy then BB & officer until leaving Sheffield in 1976. Our company had an annual 2 week camp at St Helier Jersey where we stayed in an old church which was a youth club during winter. Here we are in 1960 & 1956. I
  29. 2 points
  30. 2 points
    So many interesting things in this postcard on Ebay. The well known buildings of the period including the Foster's buildings, Central Hotel and Cafe, Walsh's and in the distance the Fitzalan Market Hall and, I think, old Town Hall. What really appeals to me though are the different vehicles, the trams, a Growler, what looks like a Landau and two donkey carts carrying advertisements for The Empire. ------------------ https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/382787090206?ul_noapp=true
  31. 2 points
    I grew up on Ridgehill Ave leaving in 1966 when I was 14. Hollinsend Rec was our local park, an all year round venue. I remember the Whit Sunday parade and also have a vague memory of a fun day, with a clown and other entertainment. The park keeper (parky) in those days was Jack Metcalfe, a pleasent chap who knew most of our names. Every evening at dusk the parky would blow his whistle, clearing the park before locking the gates to the main park and play ground. The park buildings were all painted Sheffield green, a paint source which found it's way to various houses around the city! The large wooden hut in the play ground was open at the front, so once we knew the parky had gone home we would climb over the fence and use it as our den. I have a broken front tooth which is a result of an accident in the play ground. I was climbing on the front of the cast iron rocking horse when my pal Timmy Brammer jumped on at the back causing the head to fly up and clout me in the mouth! I attended Gleadless County School and the headteacher at that time was Mr Jack Spur. Our teacher in the top juniors was Mr Dyson and I also remember Barbara Metcalfe who was the other top junior teacher. She used to take us swimming to Park Baths on City Road. I remember Mr Spur passing away when we were in the early years at Hurlfield but I can't remeber the circumstances of his death. In those days the school was only on one side of Hollisend Road, the new buildings on the other side of the road were added later. My brother John passed away in 2004 and so we scattered his ashes in the long grass by the little stream. I was surprised to see that the stream had almost dried up, when we were kids it was quite fast flowing and was full of frogs and tiny fresh water shrimps. Wonderful childhood memories of a much loved park! Wazzie Worrall
  32. 2 points
    He was 'sentenced' to the training ship by the Board of Guardians in 1901, after being caught stealing pence at school. He was born 1890 and raised in the Workhouse/Children's Homes up to that point. In Dec 1905, after 4 years of being on the training ship, during an inspection on the Southampton, he is found to be too small and it was recommended he should be sent out to a farming situation, and that the training ship should only be for strong boys. This info was found in the Guardian Minute Books held at the Sheffield Archives. Someone was kind enough to get that much info a few years back for me. So by this time, he would be nearing 16 years of age if taken off the training ship after that report. It is another 9 years before start of WWI, which he enlists, and it is those 9 years I am trying to find where he was and what he was doing. So for the 1911 census, that is half way between and gives me a glimpse. He is actually 21 by the 1911 census as his birth register shows he was older than he thought. His grave marker is off by 2 years. Most curious as to what he did from 1905 until the 1911 census. I know the answer will likely never be really known, but it sure is nice to slowly see what his life was about before coming to Canada. Hopefully he enjoyed the drayman job and stayed on there until he enlisted, where he continued on with horse, being with the R.H. and R.F.A. as a Driver. Thank you all so much for the photos and extra digging of information that I can't access over here! Much appreciated. Here is a photo showing his sentence...
  33. 2 points
    Albert Paulson cutlery manufacturer, 28 Sidney Street, Sheff 1. (1957 Kelly's directory extract), Albert also appears in the 1965 edition, at the same address.
  34. 2 points
    On Ebay at the moment described as "1930 pages from ledger with letters and advertising and price list from George Wostenholm and sons Sheffield. With Scottish connection." and "Pages from old sheffield ledger of George Wostenholm & sons dated 1930/31 totals 4 letters and 3 advertisements and 1 postcard" https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/163543357592?ul_noapp=true https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/163543349893?ul_noapp=true
  35. 2 points
    Here's a great video by a real train driver filmed by him, with explanations of the route taken this year. With unedited passage through tunnels and yes Totley Tunnel. The only time he stops the video is waiting time at stations. Things to watch for include the speed signs, especially into Sheffield. Plus how quickly the train accelerators. When he stops the train in a station, the driver has to know when to apply the brakes. There's nothing telling him now stop for the next station.
  36. 2 points
    Having taken a long hard look again my opinion is that we are being somewhat confused by the strength of the camera's ability to foreshorten the distances we are seeing. The first road junction nearest to the camera is Charles Street (on both sides of the road) and the new looking boarding on the left surrounded the site shown in the PS s24079 image (Cambridge Arcade etc.). The concrete street lighting columns would have been erected at approximately 100 foot intervals,subject to practical considerations,and if you look at their number on the original picture and how close they appear to be,that demolition site is the whole of that block of shops. That illuminated circular sign and solid white line would be a 'STOP' whilst there are double yellow lines just visible,on both photos,on the opposite side of the road corner. Between us , we seem to be getting more of the pieces of this one sorted out and just to prove that older threads can be very useful the camera location on this one would have been near to the old Barrel Inn!
  37. 2 points
    Thought this would be quite easy to answer until I spotted a glaring omission in the published Rotherham Corporation Transport Fleet Histories I consulted. All these omitted the 1952 batch of Crossley Double Deckers! Perhaps the reason for the question? Anyhow, further delving reveals these to be 209 - 214 HET 209-214. However, the chassis numbers are not in numerical sequence when it comes to road registrations and quoted delivery months. 95903 HET 509 209 5/52 95904 HET 510 210 6/52 95905 HET 511 211 6/52 95906 HET 512 212 7/52 95907 HET 514 214 9/52 95908 HET 513 213 8/52 Thus, although 213 was the last Crossley built for Rotherham it was not the last delivered. . As far as I am aware 213 is still tucked away in a bomb proof hanger at the Science Museum store at Wroughton Airfield near Swindon. Public Access is now very restricted if permitted at all. Can't say too much on a public forum other than to say an approach was made about displaying 213 at the Midland Road Open Day in 2014. Unfortunately the hoops were set too high for it to have been practical. The hope had been to display all two and a half surviving RCT Motor buses together but in the event only 135 made it, With so few RCT motor buses surviving it is to be hoped that 213 can return home at some point in the future. The South Yorkshire Transport Museum being an ideal home especially since 220 has departed for Beamish. Hope this digression into Rotherham is within the permitted boundaries of this forum.
  38. 2 points
    Probably of no interest to anyone else, but one of the photos here shows the location of my Dad’s bench, sited and dedicated to his memory for almost twenty years now...
  39. 2 points
    THANK YOU !!! THANK YOU !! I am amazed !!! You found the club and also TWO of my ancestors W Dyson and J Morley !!!! No wonder my grandmother saved the photos !!! I have no idea how you have done this SO much information, can't wait to show my dad !! and have a good read . Thanks to everyone, I knew this would be the place to find the answer !!
  40. 2 points
    A great view of Sheffield on this 1915 post card currently offered on Ebay. Taken I think from Norfolk Park, that is certainly The Farm with I think possibly the park entrance and lodge on Norfolk Park Road bottom left. Plenty of famous Sheffield buildings across the middle including, (left to right) St. George's, St. Matthew's, The Albert Hall, St. Paul's, the Town Hall, Walker and Hall's and the Cathedral. ------------------- https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/382568503293?ul_noapp=true
  41. 2 points
    I think you have the right angle there @boginspro and here’s a few photos from the same era, to help put the Cross Daggers in perspective..... The last photo is one in almost the exact reverse angle; The photographer is probably taking the shot from the corner of the square bay of The Royal Hotel. You can see the building on the left reversed and Coo Hill descending behind.... Sadly, my formative years were at the point where all this was being demolished and the ‘precinct’ replaced it. Although I lived a fair walk from ‘the village’, the precinct never really seemed to take off and only the Co-op kept it alive. When that moved to the top of Chapel Street, it was curtains for the precinct and maybe that time was the death knell for the village centre? As a ‘wudhus’ lad, it’s sad to see what’s left there today, but maybe that’s the way of all villages, having the life blood sucked out of them by shopping centres and online grocery deliveries???....
  42. 2 points
    A map (early 1950's) showing where the Dolphin beerhouse was (corner of Summer street and Mushroom Lane)
  43. 2 points
  44. 2 points
  45. 2 points
    Yes, I remember the place quite well in those days. With a range of shops including a "swap shop" and a few decent drinking holes... the place had a character of its own and wasn't notorious in those days for just drugs and trouble.
  46. 2 points
    I know this is not strictly Sheffield to be in this category but we get the 271/272 to get here. The best Fish and chip shop is ? Bradwell fisheries, the fish is huge, the chips soft and still a little greasy(just as I like them) and the mushy peas yummy!! The prices are good value, we got Haddock, chips and peas, Cod, chips and peas and two cans of pop and it was around £13.00. The service is impeccable and everything cooked fresh to order. You get all this and you are surrounded by wonderful scenery, could you ask for more?
  47. 2 points
    Indeed it is! That Chicago-built prime mover was purchased by Bentley's commercial sales manager Norman Billingham in 1964. It was bought as a non-runner from MoD Ruddington. The Hurcules 893 cubic inch diesel engine was re-built in their commercial workshops on Attercliffe Road. It was then fitted out with Holmes heavy recovery equipment. As far as I know [ I left in 1965 ] it was always garaged there. W/E.
  48. 2 points
    Some before and after photos of the City Hall site. The three old photographs taken around the Barker`s Pool area are from picture Sheffield, the present day photograph is from Google Earth. Quoting from Wikipedia about City Hall " it was originally proposed in 1916 as a Memorial Hall to commemorate the dead of the Great War" The construction of City Hall wasn`t completed until 1932! I wonder what happened to the horse trough standing by the side of the iron man?
  49. 2 points
    Fascinating building this. The Wicker Tilt Building Anyone have any information on what it was and what it was built for?
  50. 2 points
    My grandfather was driving a train made up of mainly petrol tankers from the Merseyside area on the night of the first Blitz. To secure the train they were stopped, in rather terrible conditions of dense smoke, high humidity and thick mud at the side of the track in the single bore Woodhead tunnel(s). until the all clear was given and the track made safe . I have heard stories that it was this train that the Luftwaffe were after stopping...but was their bomb aiming techniques using a radio beam that accurate I wonder?
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