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  1. 5 points
    Hi all, so glad I found this site, so much history in one place. I was born at walkley in 65, moved to Bubwith rd Brightside where my mum was born and grandparents lived. From there we lived in a cottage in Roe Woods, my dad became one of the first 6 park patrollers, on motorbikes, in Sheffield while at Roe Wood. From there we moved to Shiregreen where mum still lives. Dad was born at the bottom end of Bellhouse rd. Have lived in a few places in Sheffield and now 20 years in Chesterfield. Looking forward to reading lots more and to dig up some of my own memories and photos to share with everyone. :-))
  2. 4 points
    Here is one of my Grandfather's glass slides of High Street that looks to be taken from about the same place
  3. 4 points
    Last year's thread and I rediscovered this 35mm slide which seems to fit appropriately into this one.Taken in June 1963 when rear loaders were favourite and steam locos much in evidence at Midland Station.
  4. 3 points
    Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12
  5. 3 points
    Hello , I`m Kate , thanks for letting me join . Although I have lived in Cornwall for many years , I was born in Sheffield ( Derbyshire Lane ) and spent my youth in and around the city . I have particularly fond memories of the area around Meersbrook and Albert Road where my beloved grandparents lived , I spent a lot of time with them at number 178 , long demolished for some flats . I have old photos of their garden overlooking the Meersbrook and on up to the park , but sadly no one in the family has any photos of the front of the terrace on Albert Road . I would dearly love to visit Sheffield again but my husbands health is not good so I content myself with memories !
  6. 3 points
    From various Church magazines. St Cuthberts mid 1940s, St Hildas late 1960s, early 70s.
  7. 3 points
    Here is an extract from the 1950 OS survey Meersbrook Park in June 1963.
  8. 3 points
    Well, that was a ride out! Four hours driving to Lowestoft to see 513 in the flesh. I saw her at Beamish over 20 years ago and after our recent trips to Crich, thought we could have a ride to Lowestoft today to see the other surviving Roberts Car. Didnt look that far on the map! Carlton Colville museum is a lovely place, compact, but with a number of things to see...some a little careworn perhaps, but just enough for an afternoon out....if you’re in the area, that is, I’m not sure I’d do the drive down there again just for the day! Compared to the almost pristine condition of 510, 513 seems to have had a much harder life, is now looking a little tired and looks to need a bit of tlc. Apparently still owned by Beamish, given that they are building a 1950’s area at their site in the North East at the moment, I wonder if 513 will be heading north some time soon? Have attached some pictures of 513 and one of 510 for comparison.
  9. 3 points
    Finally! I found an image showing the building that was shown on the far left of the original photograph. The white gable end with the double chimney appears to be connected with the Abbeydale Mill. At least I think that’s what the signage above the door reads? So, I believe this is the building that was shown with the purple circle in my earlier photo. http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;u03677&action=zoom&pos=6&id=38830&continueUrl= Some more images of the area, in both directions, in different decades.... http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12848&action=zoom&pos=41&id=15752&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12951&action=zoom&pos=43&id=15850&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s16449&action=zoom&pos=48&id=19166&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12850&action=zoom&pos=57&id=15754&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;w00051&pos=7&action=zoom&id=45420
  10. 3 points
    Made in Great Britain, BBC2, Series exploring how the craft and manufacturing skills have shaped Great Britain Friday 26th October, 2100 hrs. run time, 59 minutes . Episode 1 https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bpz4ks The makers experience Sheffield's transformation into an industrial powerhouse known as 'Steel City', famous throughout the world for making high quality steel and cutlery. In this episode, four craft-makers experience Sheffield's rapid transformation from a rural market town to an industrial powerhouse that built modern Britain known as 'Steel City'. Sheffield became famous throughout the world for making high quality steel blades and cutlery. Steph McGovern takes them through the ages and they are guided by local Sheffield cutler Corin Mellor. Starting in the 18th century, they are tasked with hand forging a scythe at Abbeydale Works. This farming tool found recent fame when used by a shirtless Poldark, but the makers discover it was one of Sheffield's biggest exports that launched Britain's steel industry. The process proves to be a hugely physical challenge. Next, they step into the heart of a Victorian production line to make cutlery stamped with the fashionable King's Pattern. Steph learns that the extravagant Victorian middle class had a different piece of cutlery for every type of food. They prepare the knives, forks and spoons ready for electroplating - 'blinging' up the cutlery by covering it in silver. The biggest innovations are yet to come. Travelling forward to the start of the 20th century, the makers learn that stainless steel was discovered in Sheffield, bringing affordable cutlery to the masses. They experience Sheffield's transformation into a war machine to defend Britain - making WWII Commando Knives using a heavy duty drop stamp. Now in the 21st century, Corin Mellor takes the makers to his state-of-the-art factory, David Mellor Design. Here, they make high-end stainless steel forks from one of factory's bestselling ranges. With the city's focus on quality rather than quantity, the craft-makers discover that Sheffield's historic cutlery industry is still thriving.
  11. 3 points
    I think this answers the question - Woodbourn Hotel FC - lots of press cuttings to piece the story together.
  12. 3 points
    I may be my age but to me "then" usually looks better than "now".
  13. 3 points
    Sheffield Council Planning Department want shooting for what they've done to The Moorfoot. I grew up in a little house just across the road from The S & E Co-op or The Arcade as it was known as. The 50s and the 60s it was a vibrant and bustling area from the town hall all the way down. It's an absolute crime and I could weep when I see what it's like today.
  14. 3 points
    Before 513 went to Lowestoft she was in Blackpool. Here she is on 24 Sep 2010, a great ride from Pleasure Beach to Bispham and back.
  15. 3 points
    A few random shots from EATM, today.
  16. 3 points
    This is a Crookes one, courtesy Tom Robinson, Sheffield Transport Study Group
  17. 3 points
    Visited Black Swan Walk just off Fargate in Sheffield City Centre Very curious little place anyone else been down here?
  18. 3 points
    Some nice aerial photos from 1949, showing views of the station and underpass / subway...
  19. 3 points
    For your information the letters on the bridge BB & JH refer to Benjamin Blonk and John Huntsman. Blonk Street was so called because when it was made the "tilt" shown on the map on the river side of Blonk St.was "The Wicker ***" belonging to the Blonk Family. On the other side of Blonk St. was "The Wicker Wheel" also belonging to the Blonk Family. You will also see a third grinding shop belonging to the Blonks at the end of the dam to the right of "Blonk Island". Later on John Huntsman had a Huntsman Melting Furnace at the end of the Wicker Tilt building. If you look through the large window nearest to Blonk Bridge you will see the chimney of the Huntsman furnace preserved as a monument. Remember the old Sheffield saying "Down T'Wicker were t'water goes o'er t'weir" the weir on the upstream side of Ladys Bridge diverted water to the Wicker Tilt and Wicker Wheel. I learnt all about this by carrying out research for descendants of this branch of the Blonk family who live in Australia. My Blonk family come from a later branch of the Blonk family
  20. 3 points
    Quote from Picture Sheffield, ------- " The development was built 1899-1900 for John Henry Bryars, an animal breeder & vet. Royal Exchange Buildings comprised 20 two bedroomed flats, houses for the veterinary surgeon & groom; shops;veterinary surgery and dogs home. Castle House belonged to the Veterinary Surgeon. Further along a multi-storey stables with iron frame and internal ramps for access. In 1931 the stables were converted to a pea-canning factory for Batchelors and later occupied by Hancock & Lant Ltd., furniture store. See: Pevsner Architectural Guides, Sheffield, Ruth Harman & John Minnis Ref: 720.94274 S " http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;C03394&pos=50&action=zoom&id=3636 and the buildings are on the British Listed Buildings site here ------- https://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101246501-royal-exchange-buildings-and-adjoining-castle-house-city-ward
  21. 3 points
    I've read somewhere that the flats that face Lady's bridge and Nursery Street were originally called Castle House, the windows just above the river was where the dogs were kept when it was a Dogs Home when it re-located there from the Pond Street area in c1900 I think , it wasn't used for long as it was always damp because of the river often flooding the place. The ornamental front door was the entrance and you can still make out the name. At the end of the walk on Blonk Street bridge you can see the initials of one of the men who ran the stables there plus possibly the vets initials too, the chap that owned and ran the stables also had stabling and shoeing available at 30-36 Burton Road now known as the Yellow Arch Recording Studios but the Horseshoe above the arch tells just what it was .
  22. 3 points
    Any current or ex BB members on here? I was in 53rd at Grimesthorpe Wesleyan Reform Chapel as Life Boy then BB & officer until leaving Sheffield in 1976. Our company had an annual 2 week camp at St Helier Jersey where we stayed in an old church which was a youth club during winter. Here we are in 1960 & 1956. I
  23. 2 points
    Hi, I have recently moved to Sheffield, and come from Sussex originally however my maternal grandfather came from here, born in 1884. I'm interested in finding out more about his years here. He emigrated to Australia after the 2nd World War and died there in 1981. His name was George Huntley and grew up in Ecclesall. His father Kossuth Huntley worked on the railways. He married a Sheffielder named Mary Jane Padley in 1872. George Huntley rose to rank of Sergeant in WW1 and worked with a motorised ambulance convoy and was in the Somme in 1916/17. They are supposed to have been a well known family in their day but that was a long time ago. I have very few photos of the family but attach some here. George is in uniform pictured around 1915. His brother Louis here appeared in a 1928 article about the Charfield train accident in Gloucestershire in which their sister was killed. The sister who died, Clara Johnson, is also pictured as are their parents Kossuth Huntley and Mary Jane Padley George was a mechanical engineer and worked out of Norfolk Row between the wars where he was an agent for popular makes of cars and lorries of the day. Cheers, Alan Evans
  24. 2 points
    Census results for Albert Paulson 1901, 1911, 1939.
  25. 2 points
    Albert Paulson cutlery manufacturer, 28 Sidney Street, Sheff 1. (1957 Kelly's directory extract), Albert also appears in the 1965 edition, at the same address.
  26. 2 points
    On Ebay at the moment described as "1930 pages from ledger with letters and advertising and price list from George Wostenholm and sons Sheffield. With Scottish connection." and "Pages from old sheffield ledger of George Wostenholm & sons dated 1930/31 totals 4 letters and 3 advertisements and 1 postcard" https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/163543357592?ul_noapp=true https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/163543349893?ul_noapp=true
  27. 2 points
    Here's a great video by a real train driver filmed by him, with explanations of the route taken this year. With unedited passage through tunnels and yes Totley Tunnel. The only time he stops the video is waiting time at stations. Things to watch for include the speed signs, especially into Sheffield. Plus how quickly the train accelerators. When he stops the train in a station, the driver has to know when to apply the brakes. There's nothing telling him now stop for the next station.
  28. 2 points
    Having taken a long hard look again my opinion is that we are being somewhat confused by the strength of the camera's ability to foreshorten the distances we are seeing. The first road junction nearest to the camera is Charles Street (on both sides of the road) and the new looking boarding on the left surrounded the site shown in the PS s24079 image (Cambridge Arcade etc.). The concrete street lighting columns would have been erected at approximately 100 foot intervals,subject to practical considerations,and if you look at their number on the original picture and how close they appear to be,that demolition site is the whole of that block of shops. That illuminated circular sign and solid white line would be a 'STOP' whilst there are double yellow lines just visible,on both photos,on the opposite side of the road corner. Between us , we seem to be getting more of the pieces of this one sorted out and just to prove that older threads can be very useful the camera location on this one would have been near to the old Barrel Inn!
  29. 2 points
    I have added some notes and finding aids to the first post in this thread, including a complete list of the insurance maps.
  30. 2 points
    I can add a little about the shops at the top of Ridgehill Avenue as I lived on that road from the age of 4 in the 50s. Baumgart’s had a clean and bright feeling to the grocery shop, complete with the glass lidded tins of biscuits at the front of the counter. I always found it somewhat exotic as Mr Baumgart spoke English with his German accent. Next door was a hardware shop where I was once sent to buy extra squash glasses, decorated with coloured frosting, for one of my birthday parties. The wool shop also sold socks and stockings, even a few clothes. Priestly’s newsagaent also sold a few groceries. The parade across the road had the hairdresser, next a fruit and veg shop where you had your own shopping bag filled with your purchases, the muddy potatoes always going in first. The butchers was next and Billingham’s grocers at the end, complete with bacon slicer and I think the butter and sugar were loosely packed too. You could order your groceries before the weekend and he would deliver them to you.
  31. 2 points
    In preparedness' for the South Yorkshire Transport Trust Open Day on Sunday I have been updating my lists of surviving buses with a local connection. Having now found away to convert and save these in a compatible format for this forum I can now make these available. The first can be found below and lists the survivors that were once in the fleets of Sheffield Transport Department / Joint Omnibus Committee,
  32. 2 points
    Having not so far been reprimanded for straying over the boundary into Rotherham I will tempt fate by adding an updated list of all known survivors of Rotherham Corporation Transport (RCT) motorbuses, trolleybuses and support vehicles in Great Britain, three in each category. Actually a very small number when compared with other municipal operations of a similar size. Of particular note is FET 218 the Austin K8 Welders Truck dating back to 1949. Although sold into preservation by SYPTE in 1977 it had been presumed the lack of any reports in recent years were an indication that it no longer survived. That however was not the case and in the last couple of months ownership has changed and it has returned to South Yorkshire. Despite being stored in the open for over twenty years it is in reasonable condition with a full restoration expected to get underway shortly No photographs of FET 218 in service have yet emerged so if anyone has any please make contact. It now has a pick-up style of back which during its later days had a frame with canvas cover. Whether this was how it was originally configured is not known for sure as a previous owner recalls that it may have originally had a conventional van body that was cut down by RCT at some point. Thus the appeal for photographs. Although a number of Austin K8's have been restored, pictures of which can be found on the net, none have a similar pick up style back which does suggest that the one on FET 218 may be a product of the Rawmarsh Road body shop.
  33. 2 points
  34. 2 points
    Some photos of The Grand Hotel and surrounding area, the first two from 1926, the next five from 1951/2 and the last a modern aerial view, from approximately the same angle and height of the one before. You can see the site where ‘The Grand’ stood, but nothing visible remains of it, yet buildings immediately adjacent (and the garden on Barker’s Pool) still survive.
  35. 2 points
    One of my Uncles was a driver with STD in the 1940's, the No 48 route was his favourite when it resumed after WW2. I recall he was particularly enthusiastic about two of the 1948 new Leyland PS2/1 Weymann bodied single-deckers numbered 188 and 192 referring to them as "Flyers". Apparently a day shift for the crew would start with a trip to Crosspool on the 55 route (Double-deck) then pick up the single-decker for a return trip with the 48 to Manchester. Presumably Townhead Street garage was the 'clocking-on' location and (at that time) Castlegate was the starting point for the 48. On Saturday 3rd December 1949 I travelled to Manchester on one of the three buses needed that day (two duplicates!). My return was by car so didn't make the scheduled 'Refreshment Stop' at the Dog & Partridge which I am sure was appreciated by many! I can only remember seeing Sheffield liveried buses on the route at that time.
  36. 2 points
    No part of the council has any respect for anything to do with history or heritage. Anyone can do anything provided they provide a big brown envelope with enough £50 notes in it! That's the impression I get anyway.
  37. 2 points
    A great view of Sheffield on this 1915 post card currently offered on Ebay. Taken I think from Norfolk Park, that is certainly The Farm with I think possibly the park entrance and lodge on Norfolk Park Road bottom left. Plenty of famous Sheffield buildings across the middle including, (left to right) St. George's, St. Matthew's, The Albert Hall, St. Paul's, the Town Hall, Walker and Hall's and the Cathedral. ------------------- https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/382568503293?ul_noapp=true
  38. 2 points
    I think you have the right angle there @boginspro and here’s a few photos from the same era, to help put the Cross Daggers in perspective..... The last photo is one in almost the exact reverse angle; The photographer is probably taking the shot from the corner of the square bay of The Royal Hotel. You can see the building on the left reversed and Coo Hill descending behind.... Sadly, my formative years were at the point where all this was being demolished and the ‘precinct’ replaced it. Although I lived a fair walk from ‘the village’, the precinct never really seemed to take off and only the Co-op kept it alive. When that moved to the top of Chapel Street, it was curtains for the precinct and maybe that time was the death knell for the village centre? As a ‘wudhus’ lad, it’s sad to see what’s left there today, but maybe that’s the way of all villages, having the life blood sucked out of them by shopping centres and online grocery deliveries???....
  39. 2 points
    A map (early 1950's) showing where the Dolphin beerhouse was (corner of Summer street and Mushroom Lane)
  40. 2 points
  41. 2 points
    This is probably totally wrong, but here goes..... The item on the pole appears to be a lanyard of some sort and the dark shiny appearance would suggest that it is made of a rubberised material, or maybe a rubber coating on a rope? Trying to gauge the size of it, looking at the people nearby, when decoiled it looks like it would be maybe 6-8 feet long, with a hook (or loop) at one end and at the other end, a stiff section 18-24” long, like the handle of a whip? It appears to be only hooked on to the pole, just above head height and is meant to be taken off and used for something, then put back as it was found. You can see from the map that the position of the pole is at the interstection of where the tramlines split, one route down Wicker and the other down Blonk Street. I seem to have either read or see somewhere that the overhead lines that powered the trams were on discrete circuits and when changing route (and therefore) circuit, the tram needed to have its pantograph (the arm on the top of the tram that draws power from the overhead line) swapped from one line to another. On the top of the pantograph was a pulley wheel, with a deep recessed groove, in which the power line ran. The pantograph itself was sprung loaded, so the pantograph would always be in contact with the overhead line, as it would need a constant supply of electricity to power the motor, lights, etc. So, my theory (whacky though it might be) is that this was a device with which the tram operator used to swap lines and take a route on another circuit. They would unhook the lanyard off the pole, nip up to the top deck with it, lasso the pantograph and pull it down off the power line (hence the rubberised rope for insulation) and swing it over to the new power line, lining up the pulley wheel and relocating it to the new source. The tram would then be able to take a new route, powered by the circuit for that route........ for example, the tram would stop on Wicker, swap lines and turn down Blonk Street..... or something like that? So, I reckon it’s a pantograph puller, power line swapper, type of device...... Does that have any credibility whatsoever?
  42. 2 points
    And here's week 1 if you missed it
  43. 2 points
    It really frustrates me that not enough is known about Sheffield Castle. We don't really seem to have any information at all on this place considering what an important Sheffield structure it was. Sheffield Castle is still an enigma. Why is that?
  44. 2 points
    Yes, I remember the place quite well in those days. With a range of shops including a "swap shop" and a few decent drinking holes... the place had a character of its own and wasn't notorious in those days for just drugs and trouble.
  45. 2 points
    If memory serves me right so popular was "Costa del Clee" that the Star published an edition for Cleethorpes during works weeks when tens of thousands of Sheffield and Rotherham workers visited and Grimsby Town FC even tried to recruit supporters from our region. Certainly in the 1940/50's Sheffield Victoria was the station to use for Bridlington, Scarborough, Skegness and Cleethorpes ,whereas the Midland had services to both Blackpool and Morecombe. Victoria may have served Blackpool directly...I can't be sure...but the only time I went by train there ( late 1960s) we caught the civilised and much lamented electric service out of Victoria and changed stations in Manchester where we then caught a bone shaking DMU.
  46. 2 points
    She seems to have set up business in the summer of 1917 but given up 3 years later. Blouses and hats were a speciality.
  47. 2 points
    I really cannot say whether Mary Walton was a Roman Catholic or not...but having met the lady on more than one occasion I imagine even if she was, she would have tried to maintain her unbiased focus. Of course, I was quoting from a secondary source... and not a recent one at that. and I presume that your opinions have been guided by taking advantage of primary sources... otherwise, the danger is that of repeating the opinions of others. All I would say, and I really haven't got any axe to grind, is that almost all us would have "panicked and shook uncontrollably" when faced with the executioners block and the axe...so I cannot see how this could be held as any criticism of her. Mary, in Roman Catholic eyes ( and therefore in the eyes of most of Europe) was, without doubt, the legitimate heir to the throne...since Elizabeth was considered to be illegitimate...and, yes, I know that Henry on his deathbed made it clear to whom the Crown should pass. Mary was by any event a victim in the clash between English politics and religion...as was George Talbot who, arguably, in my own reading of the records, had Mary foisted on him, to look after her, at his own expense, by a Monarch who ,recognising his immense wealth, chose not to spend a single penny of her own in "keeping her cousin safe". We might not agree but it is good to have a little reasoned debate.??
  48. 2 points
    Fascinating building this. The Wicker Tilt Building Anyone have any information on what it was and what it was built for?
  49. 2 points
    Hia, I agree with you about the 'Stuff', but it isn't just Sheffield, Chesterfield, Mansfield, Worksop, Nottingham and all other Towns and Cities are just as bad. You've got all the direction and restriction notices to contend with on the small islands in the middle of the road, as well as the addition of working out which lane you should be in from the arrows on the tarmac, if you can see them.
  50. 2 points
    Bus stop out side Northern General Hospital...Herries Road End
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