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  1. 5 points
    Hi all, so glad I found this site, so much history in one place. I was born at walkley in 65, moved to Bubwith rd Brightside where my mum was born and grandparents lived. From there we lived in a cottage in Roe Woods, my dad became one of the first 6 park patrollers, on motorbikes, in Sheffield while at Roe Wood. From there we moved to Shiregreen where mum still lives. Dad was born at the bottom end of Bellhouse rd. Have lived in a few places in Sheffield and now 20 years in Chesterfield. Looking forward to reading lots more and to dig up some of my own memories and photos to share with everyone. :-))
  2. 4 points
    Here is one of my Grandfather's glass slides of High Street that looks to be taken from about the same place
  3. 4 points
    Last year's thread and I rediscovered this 35mm slide which seems to fit appropriately into this one.Taken in June 1963 when rear loaders were favourite and steam locos much in evidence at Midland Station.
  4. 3 points
    Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12
  5. 3 points
    Hello , I`m Kate , thanks for letting me join . Although I have lived in Cornwall for many years , I was born in Sheffield ( Derbyshire Lane ) and spent my youth in and around the city . I have particularly fond memories of the area around Meersbrook and Albert Road where my beloved grandparents lived , I spent a lot of time with them at number 178 , long demolished for some flats . I have old photos of their garden overlooking the Meersbrook and on up to the park , but sadly no one in the family has any photos of the front of the terrace on Albert Road . I would dearly love to visit Sheffield again but my husbands health is not good so I content myself with memories !
  6. 3 points
    From various Church magazines. St Cuthberts mid 1940s, St Hildas late 1960s, early 70s.
  7. 3 points
    Here is an extract from the 1950 OS survey Meersbrook Park in June 1963.
  8. 3 points
    Well, that was a ride out! Four hours driving to Lowestoft to see 513 in the flesh. I saw her at Beamish over 20 years ago and after our recent trips to Crich, thought we could have a ride to Lowestoft today to see the other surviving Roberts Car. Didnt look that far on the map! Carlton Colville museum is a lovely place, compact, but with a number of things to see...some a little careworn perhaps, but just enough for an afternoon out....if you’re in the area, that is, I’m not sure I’d do the drive down there again just for the day! Compared to the almost pristine condition of 510, 513 seems to have had a much harder life, is now looking a little tired and looks to need a bit of tlc. Apparently still owned by Beamish, given that they are building a 1950’s area at their site in the North East at the moment, I wonder if 513 will be heading north some time soon? Have attached some pictures of 513 and one of 510 for comparison.
  9. 3 points
    Finally! I found an image showing the building that was shown on the far left of the original photograph. The white gable end with the double chimney appears to be connected with the Abbeydale Mill. At least I think that’s what the signage above the door reads? So, I believe this is the building that was shown with the purple circle in my earlier photo. http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;u03677&action=zoom&pos=6&id=38830&continueUrl= Some more images of the area, in both directions, in different decades.... http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12848&action=zoom&pos=41&id=15752&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12951&action=zoom&pos=43&id=15850&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s16449&action=zoom&pos=48&id=19166&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12850&action=zoom&pos=57&id=15754&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;w00051&pos=7&action=zoom&id=45420
  10. 3 points
    Made in Great Britain, BBC2, Series exploring how the craft and manufacturing skills have shaped Great Britain Friday 26th October, 2100 hrs. run time, 59 minutes . Episode 1 https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bpz4ks The makers experience Sheffield's transformation into an industrial powerhouse known as 'Steel City', famous throughout the world for making high quality steel and cutlery. In this episode, four craft-makers experience Sheffield's rapid transformation from a rural market town to an industrial powerhouse that built modern Britain known as 'Steel City'. Sheffield became famous throughout the world for making high quality steel blades and cutlery. Steph McGovern takes them through the ages and they are guided by local Sheffield cutler Corin Mellor. Starting in the 18th century, they are tasked with hand forging a scythe at Abbeydale Works. This farming tool found recent fame when used by a shirtless Poldark, but the makers discover it was one of Sheffield's biggest exports that launched Britain's steel industry. The process proves to be a hugely physical challenge. Next, they step into the heart of a Victorian production line to make cutlery stamped with the fashionable King's Pattern. Steph learns that the extravagant Victorian middle class had a different piece of cutlery for every type of food. They prepare the knives, forks and spoons ready for electroplating - 'blinging' up the cutlery by covering it in silver. The biggest innovations are yet to come. Travelling forward to the start of the 20th century, the makers learn that stainless steel was discovered in Sheffield, bringing affordable cutlery to the masses. They experience Sheffield's transformation into a war machine to defend Britain - making WWII Commando Knives using a heavy duty drop stamp. Now in the 21st century, Corin Mellor takes the makers to his state-of-the-art factory, David Mellor Design. Here, they make high-end stainless steel forks from one of factory's bestselling ranges. With the city's focus on quality rather than quantity, the craft-makers discover that Sheffield's historic cutlery industry is still thriving.
  11. 3 points
    I think this answers the question - Woodbourn Hotel FC - lots of press cuttings to piece the story together.
  12. 3 points
    I may be my age but to me "then" usually looks better than "now".
  13. 3 points
    Sheffield Council Planning Department want shooting for what they've done to The Moorfoot. I grew up in a little house just across the road from The S & E Co-op or The Arcade as it was known as. The 50s and the 60s it was a vibrant and bustling area from the town hall all the way down. It's an absolute crime and I could weep when I see what it's like today.
  14. 3 points
    Before 513 went to Lowestoft she was in Blackpool. Here she is on 24 Sep 2010, a great ride from Pleasure Beach to Bispham and back.
  15. 3 points
    A few random shots from EATM, today.
  16. 3 points
    This is a Crookes one, courtesy Tom Robinson, Sheffield Transport Study Group
  17. 3 points
    Visited Black Swan Walk just off Fargate in Sheffield City Centre Very curious little place anyone else been down here?
  18. 3 points
    Some nice aerial photos from 1949, showing views of the station and underpass / subway...
  19. 3 points
    For your information the letters on the bridge BB & JH refer to Benjamin Blonk and John Huntsman. Blonk Street was so called because when it was made the "tilt" shown on the map on the river side of Blonk St.was "The Wicker ***" belonging to the Blonk Family. On the other side of Blonk St. was "The Wicker Wheel" also belonging to the Blonk Family. You will also see a third grinding shop belonging to the Blonks at the end of the dam to the right of "Blonk Island". Later on John Huntsman had a Huntsman Melting Furnace at the end of the Wicker Tilt building. If you look through the large window nearest to Blonk Bridge you will see the chimney of the Huntsman furnace preserved as a monument. Remember the old Sheffield saying "Down T'Wicker were t'water goes o'er t'weir" the weir on the upstream side of Ladys Bridge diverted water to the Wicker Tilt and Wicker Wheel. I learnt all about this by carrying out research for descendants of this branch of the Blonk family who live in Australia. My Blonk family come from a later branch of the Blonk family
  20. 3 points
    Quote from Picture Sheffield, ------- " The development was built 1899-1900 for John Henry Bryars, an animal breeder & vet. Royal Exchange Buildings comprised 20 two bedroomed flats, houses for the veterinary surgeon & groom; shops;veterinary surgery and dogs home. Castle House belonged to the Veterinary Surgeon. Further along a multi-storey stables with iron frame and internal ramps for access. In 1931 the stables were converted to a pea-canning factory for Batchelors and later occupied by Hancock & Lant Ltd., furniture store. See: Pevsner Architectural Guides, Sheffield, Ruth Harman & John Minnis Ref: 720.94274 S " http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;C03394&pos=50&action=zoom&id=3636 and the buildings are on the British Listed Buildings site here ------- https://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101246501-royal-exchange-buildings-and-adjoining-castle-house-city-ward
  21. 3 points
    I've read somewhere that the flats that face Lady's bridge and Nursery Street were originally called Castle House, the windows just above the river was where the dogs were kept when it was a Dogs Home when it re-located there from the Pond Street area in c1900 I think , it wasn't used for long as it was always damp because of the river often flooding the place. The ornamental front door was the entrance and you can still make out the name. At the end of the walk on Blonk Street bridge you can see the initials of one of the men who ran the stables there plus possibly the vets initials too, the chap that owned and ran the stables also had stabling and shoeing available at 30-36 Burton Road now known as the Yellow Arch Recording Studios but the Horseshoe above the arch tells just what it was .
  22. 3 points
    Any current or ex BB members on here? I was in 53rd at Grimesthorpe Wesleyan Reform Chapel as Life Boy then BB & officer until leaving Sheffield in 1976. Our company had an annual 2 week camp at St Helier Jersey where we stayed in an old church which was a youth club during winter. Here we are in 1960 & 1956. I
  23. 2 points
    Hello The other day I was cycling round Brightside and went up Colliery Road and wondered why it was there, its too narrow for two way traffic and the bridges are too low. After some time researching I have written this short essay, I think I have gleaned as much as I can for this without having to make a visit to Sheffield Archives. https://www.g7smy.co.uk/2019/04/history-colliery-road/ Karl
  24. 2 points
    Sorry I misunderstood. What I do is use the "unread content button" which should appear as on one of the pictures below , and when on the "unread content" page there should be a link top left or on the left of the same line to "activity". The activity page appears in order of date with latest activity first. You can also "mark the site read" so that old content that doesn't interest you will not appear in the unread content. "Mark the site read" in the top instance is in the menu extreme top right or in the second just to the right of unread content.
  25. 2 points
    So many interesting things in this postcard on Ebay. The well known buildings of the period including the Foster's buildings, Central Hotel and Cafe, Walsh's and in the distance the Fitzalan Market Hall and, I think, old Town Hall. What really appeals to me though are the different vehicles, the trams, a Growler, what looks like a Landau and two donkey carts carrying advertisements for The Empire. ------------------ https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/382787090206?ul_noapp=true
  26. 2 points
    My grandfather was a keen amateur photographer who died before I was born. My father had a box of his 3" glass slides that I inherited and have now digitised. Unfortunately only 2 are of Sheffield street scenes. Many of them are in the Yorkshire dales. There is even one that he took in Bruges and took one from the same bridge in Bruges to prove it. I have uploaded Fitzalan square previously. "Blade forging" was written on the other picture and may be my Grandmother's family.
  27. 2 points
    modern 'journalism' at its finest. Hide behind youtube and stir some s***. It brought the city together, made us very proud to be sheffielders and remembered the lads who paid the ultimate sacrifice. who plants the bedding plants and sweeps up from time to time is of little or no consequence. I dont see what youre trying to achieve by posting it to be honest.
  28. 2 points
    He was 'sentenced' to the training ship by the Board of Guardians in 1901, after being caught stealing pence at school. He was born 1890 and raised in the Workhouse/Children's Homes up to that point. In Dec 1905, after 4 years of being on the training ship, during an inspection on the Southampton, he is found to be too small and it was recommended he should be sent out to a farming situation, and that the training ship should only be for strong boys. This info was found in the Guardian Minute Books held at the Sheffield Archives. Someone was kind enough to get that much info a few years back for me. So by this time, he would be nearing 16 years of age if taken off the training ship after that report. It is another 9 years before start of WWI, which he enlists, and it is those 9 years I am trying to find where he was and what he was doing. So for the 1911 census, that is half way between and gives me a glimpse. He is actually 21 by the 1911 census as his birth register shows he was older than he thought. His grave marker is off by 2 years. Most curious as to what he did from 1905 until the 1911 census. I know the answer will likely never be really known, but it sure is nice to slowly see what his life was about before coming to Canada. Hopefully he enjoyed the drayman job and stayed on there until he enlisted, where he continued on with horse, being with the R.H. and R.F.A. as a Driver. Thank you all so much for the photos and extra digging of information that I can't access over here! Much appreciated. Here is a photo showing his sentence...
  29. 2 points
    Hello I was recently (and not unusually) in a charity shop looking at some teaspoons in an open cutlery sized cardboard box. I was “umming and ahing” about buying these 6 Victorian electroplated spoons that lacked any “meaningful” maker’s marks. That was until I turned the box lid over. I paid the money and the box (and the spoons) were mine. The image of the box lid is below, and that box had nothing to do with the contents. I was going to tack my photo on to somebody else’s thread, but I was astounded to not find that neither “Debesco Works” or the “Lewis Rose” concern that was based there, or “Roses” renowned owner are referenced on the forum. I already knew “stuff” about the “Debesco trademark” and “Lewis Rose Company Ltd” from another forum and the below illustrated spoon (that once might well have been covered by a box lid like that in my photo) is one of my own favoured spoons for making a coffee with. It seems from a Sheffield museums reference that the “Lewis Rose Company Ltd” was set up in 1922 by Isadore Lewis starting in the Mappin Buildings in Norfolk Street. Debesco was their trademark and Debesco Works was the name of a possible expanded workplace on Norfolk St. and Norfolk Lane (a P.S. about this later). There is elsewhere a reference also to a Debesco works on Eyre St. More clarification required please. My interest in Lewis Rose was with spoons and forks but below is some bladed interest. It is speculation on my part to suggest that the “Firth’s Stainless” knives in the photo may be pre WW2 while the knives with what appears to be a “Larko” Lewis Rose trademark could be post WW2. By the way who know what "whitening" is? My wife told me 1 option. The Spear & Jackson Company acquired Lewis Rose in 1969 but since the post WW2 period Lewis Rose had been using the “Ashberry” name in its production, as it had acquired Sheffield’s “Peter Ashberry&Sons” prior to WW2. I have given some ideas about Lewis Rose but any observations that can add to the story or contradict things are definitely required. But now why is there no reference on the forum to “Isadore Lewis, described by Sheffield’s Museums as Sheffield’s first Jewish Lord Mayor. Reference http://collections.museums-sheffield.org.uk/view/people/asitem/items@null:415/0?t:state:flow=34948cb9-a938-479b-b915-8bf7884dffb2 That was in 1963 and below is my last photo to show some of what his company was doing in the War years. That’s it fulfilling War Department broad arrow contracts facilitating our Army to march on its stomach. If there are any more “anoraks” like me, the 1942 item was a spoon and the 1944 item was a fork. The L.R.& Co. Ltd. has also been attributed elsewhere to Lewis Rose. Kalfred P.s. A little question here about Norfolk Lane. It does not appear on Google maps, but a Norfolk Row is there. Norfolk Lane addresses are to be found in “Sheffield Indexers” but latest address was 1925. Picturesheffield.com photos “shows rear” Howard Street and Norfolk Lane and Norfolk Lane from Howard St. I hope “Edmund” of cartography fame can help again.
  30. 2 points
    I would like to wish you all a happy New Year and look forward for more historical memories in the years to come
  31. 2 points
    With respect, I'm not convinced that the photo is on Wostenholm Road? I found another image on PS from the opposite direction, at the junction with Priory Place and Albany Road, but several details in this image contradict the original (Catenary Poles on wrong side, wall and trees on Priory Place side, etc.) http://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s16495&amp;pos=4&amp;action=zoom&amp;id=19211 Looking at the tram routes of the time, the Tinsley <> Carbrook <> City <> Millhouses (and eventually Beauchief) route, I have a theory that this image might be at the end of Abbeydale Road, where it becomes Abbeydale Road South, at the junction of Archer (prev. Station) Road and Springfield Road. The junction looked a lot different then and some of the buildings have now gone, whereas others weren't even built. The tram tracks are single at this point and the catenary poles are on the right side (and the same design). I marked on a map where I think the photograph was taken from and in which direction (the orange arrow) The red circle is now the Abbey Frier (note the pitch of the roof, the upper windows and high lintels) The green circle are buildings that have been demolished when the junction was widened The blue circle shows the building that is now 'Chirofirst' (note the steep pitch of the roof and the top floor, double mullioned window) The purple circle is the building (now demolished) beyond the junction of Archer Road (the building that is now 'La Scala' restaurant is out of shot on the left) The last photo shows tram No.60 travelling in the opposite direction to the Millhouses terminus, with the buildings marked in the same colour coding. I may be mistaken, but the dip and slight bend in the road look right, as do the buildings that are visible in shot. Of course, I may be a million miles away, but maybe others have an opinion?
  32. 2 points
    I have just come across this photo' of a North Western Leyland TS4 on Mam Tor. --------------- http://www.old-bus-photos.co.uk/wp-content/themes/Old-Bus-Photos/galleries/frank_brindley_collection/frank_brindley_collection.php
  33. 2 points
    Probably of no interest to anyone else, but one of the photos here shows the location of my Dad’s bench, sited and dedicated to his memory for almost twenty years now...
  34. 2 points
    Worthing Road from Google Streetview (cropped)
  35. 2 points
    THANK YOU !!! THANK YOU !! I am amazed !!! You found the club and also TWO of my ancestors W Dyson and J Morley !!!! No wonder my grandmother saved the photos !!! I have no idea how you have done this SO much information, can't wait to show my dad !! and have a good read . Thanks to everyone, I knew this would be the place to find the answer !!
  36. 2 points
    Yes they were and a load of timber plus other things like pipes. But no demolition will take out everything. Something always gets left behind. Even the people taking it down will leave there waste behind.
  37. 2 points
  38. 2 points
  39. 2 points
    In direct answer to the question, NO THEY ARE NOT. The planning panel are mostly unqualified to make an individual true assesment of the plan put forward in a sensitive conservation area. They read the paperwork proposals, but unless they have actually been to the area, and investigated how a planned building will affect the 'neighbouring properties', and talked to 'local people', directly taking on board the issues they have, they truly are NOT respectful of the reason WHY it is a CONSERVATION AREA. It was made a CONSERVATION AREA for a REASON. We all know of heritage buildings and areas lost to this WONDERFUL CITY, by past planning panels shocking decisions.
  40. 2 points
    If I remember right the ceiling was painted matt black with stars painted on to make it look as though you were outside..
  41. 2 points

    From the album: Various Old n Not So Old

    A view from my window in the 70s

    © Russell

  42. 2 points
    Known survivors from the SYPTE era are listed below,
  43. 2 points
    There is a good article on Wikipedia about air raid shelters, with pictures: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_raid_shelter#Anderson_shelter
  44. 2 points
    With a number of threads on the City Hall I thought I'd add another one myself! These two scans are from my ever increasing collection of postcards featuring Sheffield and its environs. I've scanned them quite high so that they make a reasonable download. Had a great time in the City Hall as a youth but that ones been done to death I should imagine. Neither card has been posted so there are no dates to go by. I'll let you experts work that one out. Enjoy.
  45. 2 points
    I will be heading to the Carlton Colville in September as part of a holiday in Suffolk. I have managed to pick the trolleybus weekend, so who knows if 513 will be in use. Anyway, a couple of shots of 513 in Blackpool on 11th August 1985. I wasn't able to be in Blackpool for the main Centenary celebrations so had a day out on what turned out to be a very wet August day. Thankfully the rain stopped enough for me to get some photos without ruining my camera! I also need to find and re-scan my negatives of these shots as technology and my editing skills have improved a lot since I originally scanned them. And one from November 2009 when 513 was used on a tour to commemorate the end of street running in Fleetwood before the rebuilding for the new trams. This was also a very wet day and photos were taken with a small point & shoot camera. I certainly wasn't getting any expensive camera kit out in that weather. As with Gordon's photo from 2010 above, 513 looked very smart indeed at the time.
  46. 2 points
    Indeed it is! That Chicago-built prime mover was purchased by Bentley's commercial sales manager Norman Billingham in 1964. It was bought as a non-runner from MoD Ruddington. The Hurcules 893 cubic inch diesel engine was re-built in their commercial workshops on Attercliffe Road. It was then fitted out with Holmes heavy recovery equipment. As far as I know [ I left in 1965 ] it was always garaged there. W/E.
  47. 2 points
    Backfields, round the back (or round the side) of Coles. You can see the new fire station (now demolished) at the end. The doorway on the left was (I think) Clock DVA's studio
  48. 2 points
  49. 2 points
    It was pulled down on Cromwell's orders ( the story goes that he was so disgusted that it changed hands so many times with scarcely a shot being fired that he ordered its destruction) Locals used the stone to build and repair their property and with no local post restoration nobility ,of any note, living nearby wanting to preserve it, I imagine it became just so much of a "blot on the landscape". Interest in our past is something more recent than it was in earlier times when life was a struggle for very many.
  50. 2 points
    My grandfather was driving a train made up of mainly petrol tankers from the Merseyside area on the night of the first Blitz. To secure the train they were stopped, in rather terrible conditions of dense smoke, high humidity and thick mud at the side of the track in the single bore Woodhead tunnel(s). until the all clear was given and the track made safe . I have heard stories that it was this train that the Luftwaffe were after stopping...but was their bomb aiming techniques using a radio beam that accurate I wonder?
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