Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 17/03/18 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    Hi all, so glad I found this site, so much history in one place. I was born at walkley in 65, moved to Bubwith rd Brightside where my mum was born and grandparents lived. From there we lived in a cottage in Roe Woods, my dad became one of the first 6 park patrollers, on motorbikes, in Sheffield while at Roe Wood. From there we moved to Shiregreen where mum still lives. Dad was born at the bottom end of Bellhouse rd. Have lived in a few places in Sheffield and now 20 years in Chesterfield. Looking forward to reading lots more and to dig up some of my own memories and photos to share with everyone. :-))
  2. 4 points
    Here is one of my Grandfather's glass slides of High Street that looks to be taken from about the same place
  3. 4 points
    Last year's thread and I rediscovered this 35mm slide which seems to fit appropriately into this one.Taken in June 1963 when rear loaders were favourite and steam locos much in evidence at Midland Station.
  4. 4 points
    Bus stop out side Northern General Hospital...Herries Road End
  5. 3 points
    Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12
  6. 3 points
    Hello , I`m Kate , thanks for letting me join . Although I have lived in Cornwall for many years , I was born in Sheffield ( Derbyshire Lane ) and spent my youth in and around the city . I have particularly fond memories of the area around Meersbrook and Albert Road where my beloved grandparents lived , I spent a lot of time with them at number 178 , long demolished for some flats . I have old photos of their garden overlooking the Meersbrook and on up to the park , but sadly no one in the family has any photos of the front of the terrace on Albert Road . I would dearly love to visit Sheffield again but my husbands health is not good so I content myself with memories !
  7. 3 points
    From various Church magazines. St Cuthberts mid 1940s, St Hildas late 1960s, early 70s.
  8. 3 points
    Here is an extract from the 1950 OS survey Meersbrook Park in June 1963.
  9. 3 points
    Well, that was a ride out! Four hours driving to Lowestoft to see 513 in the flesh. I saw her at Beamish over 20 years ago and after our recent trips to Crich, thought we could have a ride to Lowestoft today to see the other surviving Roberts Car. Didnt look that far on the map! Carlton Colville museum is a lovely place, compact, but with a number of things to see...some a little careworn perhaps, but just enough for an afternoon out....if you’re in the area, that is, I’m not sure I’d do the drive down there again just for the day! Compared to the almost pristine condition of 510, 513 seems to have had a much harder life, is now looking a little tired and looks to need a bit of tlc. Apparently still owned by Beamish, given that they are building a 1950’s area at their site in the North East at the moment, I wonder if 513 will be heading north some time soon? Have attached some pictures of 513 and one of 510 for comparison.
  10. 3 points
    Finally! I found an image showing the building that was shown on the far left of the original photograph. The white gable end with the double chimney appears to be connected with the Abbeydale Mill. At least I think that’s what the signage above the door reads? So, I believe this is the building that was shown with the purple circle in my earlier photo. http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;u03677&action=zoom&pos=6&id=38830&continueUrl= Some more images of the area, in both directions, in different decades.... http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12848&action=zoom&pos=41&id=15752&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12951&action=zoom&pos=43&id=15850&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s16449&action=zoom&pos=48&id=19166&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12850&action=zoom&pos=57&id=15754&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;w00051&pos=7&action=zoom&id=45420
  11. 3 points
    Made in Great Britain, BBC2, Series exploring how the craft and manufacturing skills have shaped Great Britain Friday 26th October, 2100 hrs. run time, 59 minutes . Episode 1 https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bpz4ks The makers experience Sheffield's transformation into an industrial powerhouse known as 'Steel City', famous throughout the world for making high quality steel and cutlery. In this episode, four craft-makers experience Sheffield's rapid transformation from a rural market town to an industrial powerhouse that built modern Britain known as 'Steel City'. Sheffield became famous throughout the world for making high quality steel blades and cutlery. Steph McGovern takes them through the ages and they are guided by local Sheffield cutler Corin Mellor. Starting in the 18th century, they are tasked with hand forging a scythe at Abbeydale Works. This farming tool found recent fame when used by a shirtless Poldark, but the makers discover it was one of Sheffield's biggest exports that launched Britain's steel industry. The process proves to be a hugely physical challenge. Next, they step into the heart of a Victorian production line to make cutlery stamped with the fashionable King's Pattern. Steph learns that the extravagant Victorian middle class had a different piece of cutlery for every type of food. They prepare the knives, forks and spoons ready for electroplating - 'blinging' up the cutlery by covering it in silver. The biggest innovations are yet to come. Travelling forward to the start of the 20th century, the makers learn that stainless steel was discovered in Sheffield, bringing affordable cutlery to the masses. They experience Sheffield's transformation into a war machine to defend Britain - making WWII Commando Knives using a heavy duty drop stamp. Now in the 21st century, Corin Mellor takes the makers to his state-of-the-art factory, David Mellor Design. Here, they make high-end stainless steel forks from one of factory's bestselling ranges. With the city's focus on quality rather than quantity, the craft-makers discover that Sheffield's historic cutlery industry is still thriving.
  12. 3 points
    I think this answers the question - Woodbourn Hotel FC - lots of press cuttings to piece the story together.
  13. 3 points
    I may be my age but to me "then" usually looks better than "now".
  14. 3 points
    Sheffield Council Planning Department want shooting for what they've done to The Moorfoot. I grew up in a little house just across the road from The S & E Co-op or The Arcade as it was known as. The 50s and the 60s it was a vibrant and bustling area from the town hall all the way down. It's an absolute crime and I could weep when I see what it's like today.
  15. 3 points
    Before 513 went to Lowestoft she was in Blackpool. Here she is on 24 Sep 2010, a great ride from Pleasure Beach to Bispham and back.
  16. 3 points
    A few random shots from EATM, today.
  17. 3 points
    This is a Crookes one, courtesy Tom Robinson, Sheffield Transport Study Group
  18. 3 points
    Visited Black Swan Walk just off Fargate in Sheffield City Centre Very curious little place anyone else been down here?
  19. 3 points
    Some nice aerial photos from 1949, showing views of the station and underpass / subway...
  20. 3 points
    For your information the letters on the bridge BB & JH refer to Benjamin Blonk and John Huntsman. Blonk Street was so called because when it was made the "tilt" shown on the map on the river side of Blonk St.was "The Wicker ***" belonging to the Blonk Family. On the other side of Blonk St. was "The Wicker Wheel" also belonging to the Blonk Family. You will also see a third grinding shop belonging to the Blonks at the end of the dam to the right of "Blonk Island". Later on John Huntsman had a Huntsman Melting Furnace at the end of the Wicker Tilt building. If you look through the large window nearest to Blonk Bridge you will see the chimney of the Huntsman furnace preserved as a monument. Remember the old Sheffield saying "Down T'Wicker were t'water goes o'er t'weir" the weir on the upstream side of Ladys Bridge diverted water to the Wicker Tilt and Wicker Wheel. I learnt all about this by carrying out research for descendants of this branch of the Blonk family who live in Australia. My Blonk family come from a later branch of the Blonk family
  21. 3 points
    Quote from Picture Sheffield, ------- " The development was built 1899-1900 for John Henry Bryars, an animal breeder & vet. Royal Exchange Buildings comprised 20 two bedroomed flats, houses for the veterinary surgeon & groom; shops;veterinary surgery and dogs home. Castle House belonged to the Veterinary Surgeon. Further along a multi-storey stables with iron frame and internal ramps for access. In 1931 the stables were converted to a pea-canning factory for Batchelors and later occupied by Hancock & Lant Ltd., furniture store. See: Pevsner Architectural Guides, Sheffield, Ruth Harman & John Minnis Ref: 720.94274 S " http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;C03394&pos=50&action=zoom&id=3636 and the buildings are on the British Listed Buildings site here ------- https://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101246501-royal-exchange-buildings-and-adjoining-castle-house-city-ward
  22. 3 points
    I've read somewhere that the flats that face Lady's bridge and Nursery Street were originally called Castle House, the windows just above the river was where the dogs were kept when it was a Dogs Home when it re-located there from the Pond Street area in c1900 I think , it wasn't used for long as it was always damp because of the river often flooding the place. The ornamental front door was the entrance and you can still make out the name. At the end of the walk on Blonk Street bridge you can see the initials of one of the men who ran the stables there plus possibly the vets initials too, the chap that owned and ran the stables also had stabling and shoeing available at 30-36 Burton Road now known as the Yellow Arch Recording Studios but the Horseshoe above the arch tells just what it was .
  23. 3 points
    Any current or ex BB members on here? I was in 53rd at Grimesthorpe Wesleyan Reform Chapel as Life Boy then BB & officer until leaving Sheffield in 1976. Our company had an annual 2 week camp at St Helier Jersey where we stayed in an old church which was a youth club during winter. Here we are in 1960 & 1956. I
  24. 2 points
    Many, many thanks to both Edmund and dunsbyowl1867 for their very quick replies. And the wealth of information they have given me - far more than I ever expected and I am extremely grateful. Has helped me with a much more rounded picture of the recipient of the silver vesta than I could have hoped for. Thanks again Chris
  25. 2 points
    So many interesting things in this postcard on Ebay. The well known buildings of the period including the Foster's buildings, Central Hotel and Cafe, Walsh's and in the distance the Fitzalan Market Hall and, I think, old Town Hall. What really appeals to me though are the different vehicles, the trams, a Growler, what looks like a Landau and two donkey carts carrying advertisements for The Empire. ------------------ https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/382787090206?ul_noapp=true
  26. 2 points
    Its 25 years ago today (21st March 1994) that the Supertram opened for passengers. The first tram from Meadowhall carried the local dignitaries, press etc, and the second one carried those daft enough to get up early to get to Meadowhall for just after 6am, I was one of those! There was such a long queue of people going through the long winded procedure of buying a ticket at one machine and validating it at another, that the tram left late but with a full load. First journeys were Meadowhall to Commercial Street and when we arrived I got cornered by a Star photographer and ended up with my photo in that nights paper. Nigel L
  27. 2 points
    Update to the landlords of the Bird in Hand (originally next door to the Cutlers Hall, demolished in 1832 for the west end of the new hall) from R E Leader's History of the Cutlers Company: 1736 - 1738 Matthias Hobson 1741 - 1755 William Dixon 1757-1759 John Thompson after 1761 Richard Brittlebank, then John Colquhoun 1772 - 1808 John Rose to 1817 Thomas Rose 1809 John Richards
  28. 2 points
    make every day an adventure you don't know when its your last one
  29. 2 points
  30. 2 points
  31. 2 points
    In preparedness' for the South Yorkshire Transport Trust Open Day on Sunday I have been updating my lists of surviving buses with a local connection. Having now found away to convert and save these in a compatible format for this forum I can now make these available. The first can be found below and lists the survivors that were once in the fleets of Sheffield Transport Department / Joint Omnibus Committee,
  32. 2 points
    With respect, I'm not convinced that the photo is on Wostenholm Road? I found another image on PS from the opposite direction, at the junction with Priory Place and Albany Road, but several details in this image contradict the original (Catenary Poles on wrong side, wall and trees on Priory Place side, etc.) http://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s16495&amp;pos=4&amp;action=zoom&amp;id=19211 Looking at the tram routes of the time, the Tinsley <> Carbrook <> City <> Millhouses (and eventually Beauchief) route, I have a theory that this image might be at the end of Abbeydale Road, where it becomes Abbeydale Road South, at the junction of Archer (prev. Station) Road and Springfield Road. The junction looked a lot different then and some of the buildings have now gone, whereas others weren't even built. The tram tracks are single at this point and the catenary poles are on the right side (and the same design). I marked on a map where I think the photograph was taken from and in which direction (the orange arrow) The red circle is now the Abbey Frier (note the pitch of the roof, the upper windows and high lintels) The green circle are buildings that have been demolished when the junction was widened The blue circle shows the building that is now 'Chirofirst' (note the steep pitch of the roof and the top floor, double mullioned window) The purple circle is the building (now demolished) beyond the junction of Archer Road (the building that is now 'La Scala' restaurant is out of shot on the left) The last photo shows tram No.60 travelling in the opposite direction to the Millhouses terminus, with the buildings marked in the same colour coding. I may be mistaken, but the dip and slight bend in the road look right, as do the buildings that are visible in shot. Of course, I may be a million miles away, but maybe others have an opinion?
  33. 2 points
    The new series of Doctor Who is to be filmed in Sheffield.
  34. 2 points
    Some photos of The Grand Hotel and surrounding area, the first two from 1926, the next five from 1951/2 and the last a modern aerial view, from approximately the same angle and height of the one before. You can see the site where ‘The Grand’ stood, but nothing visible remains of it, yet buildings immediately adjacent (and the garden on Barker’s Pool) still survive.
  35. 2 points
    According to the above article the original building was largely pulled down in 1868. However a building on the site was still called Attercliffe Hall. In 1878 "Attercliffe Hall" was a club for working men - with a bar - the steward was Mr Milner, presumably of the Milners who had previously resided there. In February 1879 part of the hall was advertised for rent: four low rooms, four bedrooms, W.C., stable and coach-house. Gamalial Milner occuped Attercliffe House or Hall - on Attercliffe Green Road, changed to Lord Street, now Leeds Road
  36. 2 points
    Probably of no interest to anyone else, but one of the photos here shows the location of my Dad’s bench, sited and dedicated to his memory for almost twenty years now...
  37. 2 points
    If the date on this Picture Sheffield Photograph is correct boginspro, the track extension to Abbey Lane would be a year or two after 1912 Question for Voldy! did trolley buses ever run in Sheffield?
  38. 2 points
    Film about Derwent Valley Reservoirs and Dams
  39. 2 points
    A great view of Sheffield on this 1915 post card currently offered on Ebay. Taken I think from Norfolk Park, that is certainly The Farm with I think possibly the park entrance and lodge on Norfolk Park Road bottom left. Plenty of famous Sheffield buildings across the middle including, (left to right) St. George's, St. Matthew's, The Albert Hall, St. Paul's, the Town Hall, Walker and Hall's and the Cathedral. ------------------- https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/382568503293?ul_noapp=true
  40. 2 points
  41. 2 points
    The licence for the Dolphin beerhouse, Summer street changed hands in 1915 (see 2/3 of way down on the attached) Charles Brearley to Arthur Ellis.
  42. 2 points
    Published: May 27, 1889.
  43. 2 points
    It really frustrates me that not enough is known about Sheffield Castle. We don't really seem to have any information at all on this place considering what an important Sheffield structure it was. Sheffield Castle is still an enigma. Why is that?
  44. 2 points
    If I remember right the ceiling was painted matt black with stars painted on to make it look as though you were outside..
  45. 2 points
    Known survivors from the SYPTE era are listed below,
  46. 2 points
    There was a pub called the Rising Sun on Hunshelf Road at Stocksbridge directly across the road from the billet mill. In the billet mill large ingots were rolled at yellow heat down into blooms of say up to 4" plus square, and then cut up on a hot saw into lengths to suit the customers. In an early application of technology the blooms were measured for length and a very early computer made by Elliot Automation determined the best cuts to make out of a given length to suit the various customers. The computer use first generation germanium transistors and had a 1K magnetic core store for it's memory. The pub was obviously very (too) convenient for the parched workforce and I was told the Fox's had bought out the licence and closed and demolished the pub in 1967. My connection with this came in the early nineteen seventies when I parked my A35 van (Wallace & Gromit Mobile) on the cleared ground of the pub in order to carry out the " Redex Treatment". This consisted of running around until the engine was hot, parking up, removing the air filter; and pouring a can full of Redex engine detergent/cleaner into the top of the carb. This was supposed to clear the valve stems and piston rings and restore performance. It also produced huge quantities of black smoke. When I started this procedure I had failed to notice the large billet mill high voltage substation downwind just a few yards away. I'd also forgotten that large substations often used photo-electric ray fire detection in case of fire in the oil-filled switchgear. I'd just got about half the can of Redex in the engine and couldn't see a hand in front of my face when there was a loud bang from the substation and the loud whine from the billet mill opposite wound down to a worrying silence. The penny dropped ! I flung the air filter inside the car, shut down the bonnet and was speeding back down the hill in the opposite direction to where I knew the high voltage gang would be approaching within about ten seconds. My stealthy departure was not helped by a smoke trail that the Red Arrows would have been proud of. I think I got away with it 'so don't tell anyone. hilldweller.
  47. 2 points
    If memory serves me right so popular was "Costa del Clee" that the Star published an edition for Cleethorpes during works weeks when tens of thousands of Sheffield and Rotherham workers visited and Grimsby Town FC even tried to recruit supporters from our region. Certainly in the 1940/50's Sheffield Victoria was the station to use for Bridlington, Scarborough, Skegness and Cleethorpes ,whereas the Midland had services to both Blackpool and Morecombe. Victoria may have served Blackpool directly...I can't be sure...but the only time I went by train there ( late 1960s) we caught the civilised and much lamented electric service out of Victoria and changed stations in Manchester where we then caught a bone shaking DMU.
  48. 2 points
    Indeed it is! That Chicago-built prime mover was purchased by Bentley's commercial sales manager Norman Billingham in 1964. It was bought as a non-runner from MoD Ruddington. The Hurcules 893 cubic inch diesel engine was re-built in their commercial workshops on Attercliffe Road. It was then fitted out with Holmes heavy recovery equipment. As far as I know [ I left in 1965 ] it was always garaged there. W/E.
  49. 2 points
    To quote from Mary Walton's, Sheffield:Its story and achievements... "It is one of the most pitiful affairs in {English/Scots} history, because from the moment Mary stepped upon English soil there was no way, in the circumstances, in which either queen could do right. Each might plead with Morris's Jehane: "For in such wise they hem me in, I cannot choose but sin and sin." But when all Mary's misfortunes and Elizabeth's weaknesses are taken into account, an impartial historian is forced to the conclusion that Elizabeth Tudor tried harder to avoid the graver sins than Mary Stuart did, though she fell more easier into meaner ones"..........The castle became a prison not only for Mary Queen of Scots, but for the Earl and Countess {of Shrewsbury}, for the slightest relaxation in vigilance set Mary plotting her escape and brought the awful possibility of the wrath of her cousin in London."
  50. 2 points
    Are you sure that is the canal? I think this is the river Don. The tall white building being Savile House on Savile Street.
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?

    Sign Up
×