Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/01/21 in all areas

  1. Seen them at work today bringing it down. Another one bites the dust.
    2 points
  2. The church with the question mark is St. Andrew's, on St. Andrew's Road, now demolished, used to go to Cubs there in the '60's. Nigel L
    2 points
  3. No that's the front of the Lescar, the snooker place is behind it, and Cowlishaw Road is the hill on the right going up from Sharrow Vale Road. I reckon it is from the Hallam towers. Nigel L
    1 point
  4. Yes, It is the same street but The door to Donna Hartley's fitness club was Just round the corner (opposite Dixons shop) between the top view and The Moor. It had no back door other than a fire escape because it wasn't at ground level. Donna Hartley took over the Gym which was previously known as The Gateway to Health and I used to train there in the 60's
    1 point
  5. 1st on the old Rockingham Close, just off Rockingham Street (where Primark now stands): https://www.google.com/maps/@53.376801,-1.4738505,3a,75y,36.49h,81.31t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sHcjTTm0wGjZkHVqDGv_KjA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656 2nd, the other end of Rockingham Close (between China Red/the old Plug Box Office, looking at where Primark now stands): https://www.google.com/maps/@53.3765985,-1.473929,3a,37.5y,29.36h,91.42t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1siBFStLe0xdjt3DKvYbnMPQ!2e0!5s20120601T000000!7i13312!8i6656 I believe the other two are in the same area (the old Rockingham Close/now Primark —
    1 point
  6. I would say the shots were almost certainly taken from above the Ski Village site (around the Parkwood Springs viewing platform, Mountain Bike track area).
    1 point
  7. Change Alley does not appear on the 1736 Gosling map. Leonard Webster (Town Trustee 1744-73 and landlord of Kings Head) cut up the bowling green of the Kings Head for building plots, and made the throroughfare called Change Alley. That name is used to describe a way into the yard of a large inn. Although Jewish travellers and journeymen visited Sheffield from the 1650s to buy silverware and cutlery, it was not until 1786 that there is evidence that Jews lived in the town. Isaac and Philip Bright from Biarritz (1786). Jacob Gehrwin (1787) and Abraham Gershon (1797) were the first to live
    1 point
  8. I was told many years ago that the original Change Alley was where the money changers did their business, they were mainly Jewish and not allowed to ply their trade within the walls of Sheffield Castle. I’ve no evidence to support this but thought it worth posting.
    1 point
  9. In case anyone is wondering on the position of these 1980's pictures. I can take you through them. The first picture is platform 3 the top end with the lines in the foreground leading over the Wicker Arches. Between the column of stone and the red light signal is the fuzzy image of the signal box, which I mentioned that I had to avoid the signalman in my last post. Picture two and three is platform two looking down the other way to the above picture. You can see the remains of the bay platform or platform one which would not need to be accessed by the subway system or bridges. The ba
    1 point
  10. Incidentally I think the good folks of Woodseats and thereabouts owe a MASSIVE debt to Ray ? Brightman who must have been constantly out with his camera capturing what would have been mundane street scenes but have captured the changes over a significant period and comprise the bulk of Picture Sheffield’s catalogue
    1 point
  11. I’d sort of worked out it must be between very late 60s and late 70s and Edmunds photos verify that. I notice on the last pic that the building was Seashells cafe at the time
    1 point
  12. We watched the full monty last bit and Realised this is a still from the film!
    1 point
  13. I lived opposite the camp on Raeburn Road, late 5Os when the maisonettes were newly built so had a grandstand view of what to a young lad, was a fascinating place. Yes definitely two ‘gate guards’ ; a wartime monoplane fighter ( I’d have said a Hurricane but bow to better recall of others. Similarly, I’d have said in camo colours but unsure now. Certain however that’s its small (jet fighter) companion was silver though couldn’t now state its type). Recall the ’At Home Days’. Also the active maingate/guardroom. I believe that the place even had its own (WAAF) band! My understanding was
    1 point
  14. I guess back in in 80s/90s I had a very interesting conversation with the old fella who ran what I think would be called a ‘Little Mesters’ workshop directly behind Morton’s (though I think unconnected ) where the flats complex now is. He was showing me some ‘serious’ and very expensive (non-Rambo!) hunting/survival knives which he was making and selling to selected customers only. He was situated on a narrow lane, first right down the lane in the photo, now blocked with a lamp standard and a grit bin. He said that a car load of ordinary looking guys dressed in jeans etc, had some months b
    1 point
  15. Whoops! Yes, it is obviously Abbey Lane, I don't know why I made that error. Possibly my early onset something or other. 20 Abbey Lane: 1904 - 1911 Joseph Evans, Company Secretary (tool firm) 1907 - 1915 George Sampson & Son Auctioneers, Valuers and Estate Agents (run by Harry and Edward Sampson) Harry was secretary of the Norton Show 1920 Abbey Garage - proprietor Walker 1925 Frederick Wood proprietor of Abbey Garage 1920 - 1939 S Higton & Sons builders, joiners and contractors, run by Charles and Thomas Higton. In 1939 Thomas Higton (bricklayer) wife E
    1 point
  16. Yes. Remember the Slammer in the 70s . I had friends who worked at the Town Hall and it was considered a cool, trendy place to dine Attercliffe style. Very basic menu and limited choice served in large white bowls, I think. It was very unlike the Vesta Beef Curry I’d been buying as a curry connoisseur a few weeks previously.
    1 point
  17. The guy who ran the train set up was confined to a wheelchair as I recall, the kids absolutely loved him, he was a real star, great memories.
    1 point
  18. Birch Road traced a straight route northwesterly from Stevenson Road to Faraday Road and the original Crown sat at the eastern junction (of Birch & Faraday). Though the north-western end was enclosed by the works expansion noted above, and subsequent. Birch Road's earlier, full course remains evident in later maps. Bessemer Road coexisted with Birch Road whilst the latter was at its full extent (as the article you quote from suggests). As an educated guess I'd say the bulk of both roads sprang up through the early to mid 1870s. The death of Hopkinson at the premises would rather indic
    1 point
  19. I managed to sneak onto the station in the late 1970 via the cattle dock bay and used the white steps to get onto the platform. We had to sneak pass the signal box when the guy wasn't looking. It was bit more intact at that point too. It always fascinated me even to this day. I suppose it was due to the fact that it was very different to Midland Station. Being raised above ground and having the electric overhead wires running through it. The style of the buildings was different to the Midland and for someone interested in train spotting there was the possibility of seeing locos that didn't go
    1 point
  20. Hi yes I remember the Low Drop it was a little pub in the middle of a load of steel firms I used to work as a wire drawer at a firm called Arther Lee & sons and used to call in there for a couple of pints after shift happy days
    1 point
  21. Well north west, but definitely towards Manchester.
    1 point
  22. RichardB posted a photo in June 2009 of a street with terraced houses on one side and asked if anyone knew where it was. I have only just joined this site and seen it whilst researching Carnarvon Street where I lived as a child. I don’t know how to negotiate this site and display photos yet but I am 100% sure that it shows my house on Carnarvon Street. I don’t know if his question asking where it was has been answered, so my apologies if it has. I wonder if it could be reposted so that I might look at the answers. Thankyou
    1 point
  23. No, that building is Sheaf House at the railway station. The picture is definitely Olive Grove sports ground. The clubhouse was demolished some years ago and replaced with a more modern building. Used to go there for meetings when I worked for the council.
    1 point
  24. There’s a bit of information on the history here: https://www.sheffieldguide.blog/2020/05/24/sheffield-ski-village-an-olympic-dreams-wasteland/ Also details plans to resurrect the site post-COVID.
    1 point
  25. I understand that this scene was filmed in the early hours of the morning using some impressive lighting set up to simulate daylight which explains why there are no other people about and it's so quiet.
    1 point
  26. ROLL OF HONOUR CIVILIAN WAR DEAD SHEFFIELD 1939-1945 The list below details the Surname-First Name- Age - Date of Death or Injury -Place of Death or Injury Abbey Ada 77 yrs 12 Dec 1940 422 Springvale Road Abbott Thomas 40 yrs 12 Dec 1940 103 Bloar Street Addy Gertrude 56 yrs 13 Dec 1940 9 Windsor Road Addy Joseph 57 yrs 13 Dec 1940 9 Windsor Road Alcock Frederick 50 yrs 13 Dec 1940 34 St Marys Road Allen Mary 32 yrs 12 Dec 1940 High Street Antcliffe Arthur 10 yrs 15 Dec 1940 96 B
    1 point
  27. Well there are circa 70 in operation throughout the U.K. so there has to be a good reason why a city the size of Sheffield is unable to keep one open. Our son used to love his weekly trip to Sheffield Ski Village in the 1980’s, I recall it being both very well run and attended, answers on a postcard please.
    1 point
  28. My guess would be Balaclava Road. It's blocked off at the bottom end. The white line runs from the bottom of the ski slope, past the circle that was the gas holder and continues through the Infirmary Road Aldi. Balaclava Road is close by and the Council website shows planning permission granted for new buildings at Antiquity Ltd on this road.
    1 point
  29. Alamy reckon this engraving is from 1844 but more likely from an edition of the Illustrated London News in 1851 when the Victoria Station opened.
    1 point
  30. Lived at No.7, which is the house to the left of the gennel at the side of the van. That is in fact my dads old van. Spent many a Sunday off to Brid and Skeggy in that. Dare say the kids playing on the pavement are me and my brothers, I must have been about 5 when that was taken. Behind the camerashot, in the the right hand corner, was a scrap yard. Halfway down the road,on the right hand side was the rag and bone mans house. To the bottom of the road, fronting Broughton Lane, was the corner shop.
    1 point
  31. Some of the crosses mentioned in this thread appear in this 1736 map of Sheffield city centre.. https://www.picturesheffield.com/maps.php?file=008
    1 point
  32. Hello I just finished writing the code for this Watermills of Sheffield page, it's an interactive map showing all the locations of the watermills listed in the book 'The Water-Mills of Sheffield' by W.T. Miller published in 1947. Tap on a mill for its name, and tap on the name for the description from the book. https://www.g7smy.co.uk/history/watermills/ I've written it for use on a mobile phone, for when you are out and about, and on this the GPS can be used to show your location. It will also work with a desktop PC. Thanks Karl.
    1 point
  33. When I first joined this brilliant forum it was just a new thing to me and I suppose it was for the other members too, but over time the forum has developed and come of age, the appearance and general lay out is very good, I especially love the old Sheffield coat of arms, a bit of colour in these dark times does bring some comfort to my old heart.
    1 point
  34. An ancient street completely lost in the name of progress.
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...