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  1. Edmund

    Edmund

    Sheffield History Member


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  2. Stu_1981

    Stu_1981

    Sheffield History Member


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      57


  3. SteveHB

    SteveHB

    Sheffield History Admin


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  4. Heartshome

    Heartshome

    Sheffield History Member


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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/07/20 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    A few bits from 1926 newspapers for those interested:
  2. 3 points
    Hia all, just to add another name to the mix. I have spoken to my friend who grew up in Crookes, where her Gran had a shop till the '50s. She remembers the name ' DROICH' and this spelling, but has no idea where it was.
  3. 3 points
    Hi all. I have written a biographical piece on my great-great grandfather, PC Thomas Clifford of Derbyshire Constabulary, who was posted to the area of Sheffield's border with Derbyshire in the early 1880s. This has now been published online, as a freely downloadable pdf document, by Derbyshire Family History Society (DFHS). The piece is 82 pages with as many period images, and takes about two hours to read. Many members of the community which PC Clifford patrolled were culters, and others wandered down from the city to drink in the pubs over the border. I therefore devote a significant amount of space to them. In case anyone has any use for links to the pdf, such as adding to a web page or sharing in other ways: The page where DFHS have placed the link to open the pdf - https://www.dfhs.org.uk/member_downloads.php?catid=6 Direct link for the pdf itself - https://www.dfhs.org.uk/filestore/PC_Thomas_Clifford_1880-85_110.pdf To navigate from the DFHS homepage, select 'Data & Downloads', then 'Downloads Area', and the link 'PC Clifford' appears under 'File categories (Public)'; this opens the page on which the link to the pdf appears I lived in Brimington on the north edge of Chesterfield in the mid-1990s when I worked in Sheffield, just off Ecclesall Road. Best wishes, John Clifford
  4. 2 points
    Hi Heartshome and syrup, thank you for your replies. My knowledge of the object in the photo is only the same as anyone else's who looks at it I'm afraid. Personally I think it is a Dromedary camel, but that is only my impression and a differing opinion from another person may be equally correct. The only thing I would say is that generally speaking, someone creating a sculpture of this sort would tend to enhance the qualities of the object they were sculpturing, and personally I don't think that a strong proud hunting dog would have been depicted with any sort of humped back. However as I say that is only my impression, and I could easily be wrong. I have googled trade marks for Johnson Cammell & co, Charles Cammell, and Cammell Laird & Co Ltd and most of the images for the trade marks depict a Bactrian camel (two humps) and not a Dromedary camel (one hump). However I found at least two references to the Charles Cammell trademark below, which is a Dromedary Camel. However I still look at the puzzle with an open mind as I do not want to go down the route of trying to make the evidence fit a preconceived solution as it were. Thanks again Leipzig
  5. 2 points
    Most houses were lucky to have a water closet in the yard, privies were still predominant (let alone indoor water closets). As late as 1926 1,820 Sheffield privies were converted to water closets, which certainly didn't have a stack pipe or vent. This number of conversions was about average for the period from 1904, though numbers fell to virtually nil during the war. The council changed its policy in 1919 - prior to the war they allowed one wc to two houses. This policy change meant that an additional 5,000 wcs would be provided (1,000 conversions and 4,000 additional). The council did the work but were not allowed to contribute to the cost.
  6. 2 points
    If you look at modern houses you will see that the waste pipes to all toilets have what is called a stack pipe that goes right up to the roof area open at the top. This allows air to get into the sewer system. And stops sewer gas going into your house.
  7. 2 points
    I've just discovered what the "rp" on Ordnance Survey maps means - revision point. In the 1940s the Survey took photos of selected points to make cross referral of new mappings easier. Some of the photos have been re-discovered and put on-line. The only ones for Sheffield are those taken in Attercliffe. For example: Revision Points discussion Attercliffe Revision Points
  8. 2 points
    Here's the newspaper account of Samuel's fatal accident
  9. 2 points
    With reference to the Coins found in The Olive Branch that were proved to be Medieval, here is a case of counterfeit coins. Sheffield Daily Telegraph 02 June 1866
  10. 2 points
  11. 2 points
    Research in my tram books tells me the Handsworth tramway extension was opened in 1909 as far as Finchwell Road, and the Darnall spur was opened at the same time, in the early days used by alternate cars, but I suspect not for long.
  12. 2 points
  13. 2 points
    Is it Twitch Hill Hall? There's a Twitch Hill in Horbury, but I don't know of any reference to Crookes.
  14. 1 point
    Keep hoping my friend, someone may surprise you one day. Best wishes Heartshome.
  15. 1 point
    Hi Heartshome Good find. If only my ancestors had been able to invest in a bit better camera equipment (presuming it was one of them who took the photo) we would have a clearer idea of what exactly the animal was, but I suspect we will never know for sure, but thanks for your input, it is appreciated. It was one of those things where realistically I didn't expect to solve my puzzle, but would have always regretted not having tried, by posting the photo on the site. My hope was that someone might have had a memory of a camel sculpture being in the area around the time of the photo, a camel perhaps being a bit rare, that was my thinking. Regards Leipzig
  16. 1 point
    Thanks for the video, very enlightening to me who hasn't seen Sheffield for many years. I suppose I am just an old fogey and younger people may disagree but to me they have made a real pig's ear of The Moor and many other parts of Sheffield. Concrete and glass is not the Sheffield I loved.
  17. 1 point
    Reminded me of my uncle in Egypt, one hump (dromedary) camel
  18. 1 point
    Hoping for assistance please! I'm looking for any information about Grove House on Barnsley Road. It was briefly mentioned in the post at: The occupant in 1833 was William Wilkinson (gent) as listed in the White's Directory. William had inherited Crowder House some years previously, but the Crowder estate was rented out (advertisement in the ‘Independent’ in 1831), probably to George Barrett, cattle dealer etc. Barrett went bankrupt in 1841 and his unpaid rent meant that William had to mortgage the freehold of Crowder House to Thomas James Parker, William remaining as a tenant for life. In 1851 the land (57 acres) was being farmed by Mira, the eldest of William’s daughters, living at Crowder with 2 of her sisters, while her brother Walter was manufacturing shears in Sheffield. On William’s death in 1854 he left Longley Bottom House and its orchard to his widow Sarah (who would die in 1860). In May 1855 the family were dispossessed of the Crowder part of William's estate under an action of ejectment initiated by Parker and others. Bernard Wake then bought the estate from Parker by public auction on 2nd February 1857. There was ill-feeling between the Wilkinsons and the Wakes - reported in newspaper articles in August 1857 and February 1858 regarding court cases of apple stealing, trespass and boundary disputes. I've looked at some old maps of the Barnsley Road area for Grove House, with no luck - possibly not old enough?. Any info would be much appreciated!
  19. 1 point
    A report by Historic England is available by this link (though it doesn't answer your question): Historic England POW Camp Report Excerpt: Each Prisoner of War camp was allocated an official number during World War II within a prescribed numerical sequence, ranging from Camp 1 (Grizedale Hall, Ambleside) through to Camp1026 (Raynes Park, Wimbledon). This numbering sequence has posed problems for the assessment as some sites have different numbers at different dates (Quorn Camp, Leicestershire – Camp 9 and Camp 183), the same camp number can be used for different locations (Camp 17 – Lodge Moor Camp, Sheffield, and 22 Hyde Park Gardens, London) and some sites have a letter suffix rather than a distinctly different number (Camp 139b Coxhoe Hall, County Durham). Without further documentary research it is hard to tell whether the inconsistencies in the numbering system were the result of a deliberate policy, or of the fluidity of the situation. There is certainly documentation held in The National Archives to show that the British were unwilling to release the location of Prisoner of War camps to the Germans due to the fear of possible paratroop raids to release them. The Germans on the other hand indicated that they were seeking the information to ensure that they did not bomb the camps by mistake. The Sheffield Camps in this report were: Ref 17 Lodge Moor Camp, Redmires Road, Base Camp Pre-First World War army camp. Capacity substantially increased by the provision of tented accomodation. Guarded by double wire perimeter fences and watch towers. Footings and perimeter wall remain extant Ref 127 Potter's Hill, High Green, German Working Camp See Camp no.296 Ref 248 Norton Camp, Cinderhill Lane, Norton, German Precise location not identified, NGR Sheffield Working Camp given for approx feature centre of Cinderhill lane. Ref 296 Potter's Hill, High Green, German Working Camp See Camp no.127 (Ref 296 Ravensfield Park Camp, Rotherham Farmland) The journal here: Forces Postal History Journal states that camp 701 was "non communique". Multiple 701's here: According to an Italian person tracking the movements of POW relative, they were moved from Lodge Moor to camp 701. So possibly it was a local temporary transit camp, used as a staging point on their way home?
  20. 1 point
    A bigger picture would help, but from memory of other photos I think the chimneys are those on the station building.
  21. 1 point
    Here's a view inside the King's Head, Change Alley, taken June 1902. The photographer was Henry Bedford of Bedford Lemere And Company, and the photo was taken for Seligman and Mackay (Sheffield) Ltd, hotel proprietors who owned the Kings Head. and the smoking room: more photos here: Kings Head Change Alley
  22. 1 point
  23. 1 point
    hello is there any more pictures used to love this pub back in the day
  24. 1 point
    Samuel was dead by 1828 when his eldest daughter married. His wife (unfortunately only referred to as Mrs Kirkby) died in 1832 at Askern, near Doncaster, where she had gone to benefit from the mineral springs. Their eldest daughter was Marianne, who married Samuel Scholefield of Spring Head Hall, Hull, by licence on 28th December 1828 at St Peters, Sheffield. The licence stated that she was 21. Their 2nd daughter was Sarah, who married Charles Appleby (of the firm Walker, Wilde & Co, steel converters) by licence at St Peters on 24th April 1828. In 1841 they were living at "The Mount" Broomhill. Their daughter Emily married William Alexander Esq. M.D. on 4th October 1837 by licence at Scalby near Scarborough. In 1851 they were living with her sister Eliza and husband in Halifax. William died aged 81 in April 1888 at Blackwall, Halifax. Their daughter Eliza married Gervase Alexander M.D. by licence at St Luke's, Liverpool on 13th October 1838. The Alexanders were a Scottish family with claims to the Barony of Burgh and the Barony of Strabolgi. In 1851 they were living at Blackwall, Halifax with sister Emily and her husband. Eliza died on 10th January 1882, by then the widow of Gervase, at Victoria Road, Sheffield. Their youngest daughter Ellinor (or Eleanor) married Henry Roberts M.D. of Paradise Street Birmingham, by licence at Scalby near Scarborough on 13th October 1835. She was stated to be 23. Samuel's youngest son Edward, living in Manchester, married Anne Holwell, the daughter of the Reverend Laurence Short, rector of Ashbourne. They married on 7th May 1836 at Bishop's Court, Kirk Michael on the Isle of Man (his name is mistranscribed as Kirkley). In 1851 they were living at East View, Broomhill Sheffield where Edward was a 42 year old wine and spirit merchant. Samuel's other son, also Samuel, born about 1795, married Sophia (possibly Whitehead, at St Mary's Lambeth on 30th August or 2nd September 1837, Samuel was stated to reside at "The Elm" Sheffield. Sophia was the 3rd surviving daughter of Alexander Whitehead, Secretary to his Majesty's Transport Board.) In 1851 Samuel and Sophia were living at Ballagh, IoM, Samuel was a 56 year old "gentleman by annuity". Samuel died on the Isle of Man aged 61 on 8th December 1855. Sophia died the widow of Samuel late of Grove House, Sheffield at Osborne Terrace, Douglas, Isle of Man on 23rd January 1872 aged 69.
  25. 1 point
    Here is the sale information that @Edmund mentioned above. It seems that Samuel's wife (Sarah) had left Grove House the year before she died.
  26. 1 point
    Thank you so much- that’s so very helpful. No mention of his wife’s name but I think this must be them because the date and locations all fit with the article. It seems Samuel died in 1812. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/92419528/sarah-kirkby
  27. 1 point
    Samuel was still registered as living at Grove House in 1825 (according to this directory):
  28. 1 point
    A few newspaper clippings for you here @Milicent. They should help with narrowing down dates as it appears that Samuel died pre-1828. His wife died in 1832.
  29. 1 point
    Some good reading for me there syrup, thanks for taking the time to find those documents. I do know that Robert Chapmans mother - Margery Green, was married previously, obviously to a Chapman, but I believe this husband died. She then took in a lodger, (Thomas Green?), and ended up marrying him (as per your document) and having further children. The family story goes that his mother Marjery Green (or possibly one of her daughters) whilst a child lived in Alnwick Northumberland, and whilst trying to use the village water pump a finely dressed gentleman on horseback approached. She asked the gent if he could help work the pump for her, which he did. As she walked away she was told by locals that the gent was non other than the Duke of Northumberland and how dare she make him pump water for her 😀 Apparently the pump is still there today..
  30. 1 point
    Wow, thats brilliant, i really appreciate you finding this for me. PC Chapman was my grandfathers uncle. My grandfather also became a police officer in Rotherham, then Sheffield and then South Yorkshire Police until he retired in 1976. Its nice to be able to find something out about PC Chapman, as all my grandfather knew was he had died 'coming off duty'. Thanks again. I now need to find a census for that year to see what house number Park Street he lived at. I see that Park Street is still there in Higher Broughton, Salford
  31. 1 point
    SHEFFIELD CITY CENTRE | A walking tour of Sheffield City Centre, Yorkshire, England - Filmed in 4k SHEFFIELD CITY CENTRE | A walking tour of Sheffield City Centre, Yorkshire, England - Filmed in 4k Watch it here on our new Videos section 👉 SHEFFIELD CITY CENTRE | A walking tour of Sheffield City Centre, Yorkshire, England - Filmed in 4k
  32. 1 point
    Page taken from Bradfield Parish Newsletter, March 2013, has a mention of the four toughs on Loxley Road. www.bradfield-yorks-pc.co.uk/documents/Newsletter March 2013.pdf Quote "Four troughs on Loxley Road are particularly interesting. The upper troughs have a canopy, which would have enabled only the householders to collect water, stopping animals’ access to the water and avoiding contamination.The lower troughs were there to provide animals with a drink. Along the front of these lower troughs is a row of ‘Kicking Stones’ – there to prevent animal hooves from damaging the troughs." Edit: added to
  33. 1 point
    This one is at Loxley, on the main road between the Admiral Rodney pub and the bottom of Rodney Hill
  34. 1 point
    Hi all, On a recent trip to Darnall I spotted these two buildings in the main shopping area. They look like they've seen a bit of history in their time. Have they always been shops? Do we know anything about the history of these buildings?
  35. 1 point
    Yes, good shout. I can see the tracks on the maps I posted a while ago. I also just noticed on the old photo of the building with the “OXO” advertisement on the gable end, you can just make it out on the current maps on street view (top image)..... unless it’s my eyes playing tricks and/or wishful thinking?!
  36. 1 point
    The chip shops were on the other side of the road, do you remember Lomas's, their fishcakes superb
  37. 1 point
    Nice to see those buildings still there, they were certainly there when I was a child in the war. There was a little used tram terminus in the road at that point. There is a picture on the Crich Tram Museum site with a tram standing there and the left hand building in the shot. (I don't think I have permission to put it on here). I don't know when the tram spur was covered over, but the trams finished altogether in 1960.
  38. 1 point
    Hi SteveHB, saw a photo of a good stone TROUGH on Ughill Wood Lane, Bradfield
  39. 1 point
    I think this is my favorite explanation. There was no essential need for a bridge but building one would have certainly made for a grand entrance and indeed elevated perspective to the newly demarcated estate plots. As Edmund points out above the bridge doesnt go over the river but I acknowledge that that it could have added a challenge to cross although Sheffield was well in to culverting season by this point. So on that basis of what Rover says I would see the bridge as a means by which the new residents of this area could literally elevate themselves above the other existing residents by making such conspicuous and no doubt grandiose entrances and exits to the estate. It must have added to the desirability of the place.
  40. 1 point
    Schedule of street name changes in 1886
  41. 1 point
  42. 1 point
    Seems no one has anything to say on this, so here's my take on it. Assuming World War 2 hadn't happened and the railways hadn't fallen into such a dilapidated state, and Labour didn't win the election, they Big Four would probably have survived, at least for a while. By the 1950's travel was changing, with an increase in road freight competition and the rise of the private car. Could the companies have competed any better than BR? Railways had to compete on a national scale as far as freight went, to keep the long haul stuff and let local distributors deal with the town areas. The trouble with the smaller depots like Darnall and Attercliffe was they were incredibly labour intensive, and costs were rising, so pushing the traffic onto the roads where fewer people were involved , hence lower costs. With the onset of containerisation new facilities would have to be built, but would each company want to go to that expense? Tinsley was already pretty redundant by the time it opened as the freight traffic had changed in just a few years. The electrification scheme started by the LNER would probably have been extended to London, there was originally a large order for the EM2's which was cut back to just seven, so it was obviously on the cards. How long the companies would have lasted is another matter, falling passenger numbers, falling freight loads, all due to road traffic, would probably have led to amalgamations and takeovers, and assuming the Government didn't get involved, we would probably end up with a couple of large private companies, like First and Stagecoach. Non profitable routes would have to be cut (just like local bus services are these days), so some rationalisation would be inevitable. It's difficult to say if Sheffield Victoria would still be with us today, there are so many variables, remember its staple traffic was coal, and that's gone, passenger numbers from the intermediate stations wouldn't be high enough to keep it viable so we are left with just the through traffic from Sheffield to Manchester. The alternative via the Hope Valley has the stone and cement traffic to keep it viable, so the Woodhead would probably been closed, but probably not as early as the 1980's. It's all conjecture, and others may have a different take on it.
  43. 1 point
    There is also a Twitch Hill in Hope. I found reference to a Twitch Hall Farm in newspapers from late 1880s to 1920s. The postcard seems to show a collection of buildings rather than a 'hall'.
  44. 1 point
    Its a strange one this one. Bernard's father according to the marriage cert was a John. There is a Bernard Mannion baptised in Sheffield with father John in 1860. Obviously doesn't have to be this particular one and it doesn't fit the death age given on the gravestone. I found the Bernard Mannion mentioned above having done 12 years in the army, he lists his place of birth as Dewsbury. I can't seem to find anything else that I could say for sure is this chap. It's an interesting hunt though.
  45. 1 point
    Thanks Guys Here`s the 1898 map of Norton for you LeadFarmer , also the pump at the top of Cobnar Road
  46. 1 point
    A question that seems perfect for this thread. Would Victoria Station still have been here if the big four railway companies not been nationalised in 1948? My take on it would be yes it would be still here. The LMS and LNER would have been in competition still with each other. The LNER had the better and faster route to Manchester and there would have been no need to get rid of the over duplication of routes. Plus being private companies the Conservative party would have let them compete with the private road haulage firms and would have been more willing to invest in improvements, rather than moaning about how much public money was being used to top up the national railway system. LNER before the war had already made investments in the electrification scheme, so they would have continued to invest in electrification probably faster than British Rail did. The route to London from Victoria was much better than the Midland's. And I suspect the electrification scheme would have gone all the way to London King's Cross. In many way Nationalisation of the railway was disaster for it. Since it meant that someone looking at the whole system could see where two stations serving one place wasn't cost efficient. And even though the rail unions wanted it, they would have thought different I think if they could have seen how many staff lost their jobs because of it. And they lost jobs not because lines lost money. But because one person could view the entire system. And also the National system was easily undercut by private road transport arguing that the British Rail had more advantages over them. When they knew how to bypass them. Had the four railway operators still been running the system, they could have got as much investment as what the road lobby did. And things like building road bridges over the Humber without having a railway on it too, would have been unlikely to have happened. But BR could have never argued the case, since it would have been seen as asking for more public money to invest in the bridge scheme. Because Victoria had a good connection route with the suburbs of Sheffield that emerged later at Halfway, Mosbrough and Killamarsh, I believe that improvements to the stations, including a new one for Halfway itself would have taken place. Especially as the main line to London also would have still used the route. This would have cut the traffic down using the main roads into Sheffield, which was the argument for the expensive Supertram Scheme. Thus eliminating Supertram. Whereas under BR keeping the route open, when the London link had stopped, wasn't economic. Indeed running trains out of Midland station going North then diverting South would have been silly. And London trains coming down from the North from Rotherham and Leeds for example, again would not making sense turning them around to go via Nunnery Curve to get them back on LNER line to London. Ending up for the need of Supertram from Halfway to Sheffield. I rather doubt the Tinsley marshalling yard and depot would have been built though. The two railway companies would have looked at the long term economics of the scheme. Darnall depot would have continued in operation for the LNER and the Midland would have used the one at Attercliffe. The people at British Rail were thinking on a national scale for the movement of freight. Whereas the private road operators were on a local level on that subject, responding to what was needed by private companies. I suspect the four railway companies would have done the same. So would have built yards on the demand that was there already.
  47. 1 point
    Thanks for the photo', it's nice to see a few Darnall buildings that have not changed too much from my time round there (50/60 years ago) . From memory and including the building just shown on the right it was a row of smaller but very useful shops. On that part of Main Road there were shops selling virtually everything, plus a couple of good chip shops, pubs, and the club.
  48. 1 point
    Moorhead Crimea Monument in Sheffield City Centre
  49. 1 point
    Since the first post you quoted was written, I’ve joined the Traffic Dept at Crich and become a conductor. We use the Tardis in summer to store bottled water in for the crews to grab a drink in between trips. This summer (my first season) it has been packed out down there and the tardis has had many admirers. Some one mentioned, a few weeks back, that they though it was the last of its kind in existence.
  50. 1 point
    Here we see the seats being turned into the opposite direction so that they are facing the other way !
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