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  1. Edmund

    Edmund

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    Sheffield History

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  3. SteveHB

    SteveHB

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  4. lysandernovo

    lysandernovo

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 26/01/21 in all areas

  1. Here are a selection of paintings by a Sheffield artist who was active in the very early 1800's, W Botham. There's not much information available but apart from the late birth date I'd say he was William Hallam Botham, born 23rd April 1790 to Eleanor and George Botham. George Botham was a Confectioner and Glass and China merchant in 1792, based at Irish Cross, selling raisins, nuts, lemons, prunes etc. In August 1797 the business was at 14 Market Place. William Botham was a fellow apprentice of Francis Chantrey when they were both at Ramsey's carver and gilder, High Street. Later, Cha
    6 points
  2. I was looking through some photos I had saved, and what a surprise, the London Road shop 🙂
    3 points
  3. Len, the pub you mention (Bagshawe Arms) is still there, and the site is relatively untouched/neglected, but its a great site for wildlife. Although the buildings are gone, you can still make out the original layout of the site today. A small section of the original road is still there, from before they made the dual carriageway, that section survives as a curved lay-by where I've marked the arrow. I believe this is where the original main entrance was?...
    3 points
  4. Just found this picture of the Albert Hall amongst my mother-in-laws old photos - it says it was taken just after the fire
    3 points
  5. 2 points
  6. I live in walking distance of Norton Aerodrome and have done all my life. I took my camera there the other year and photographed the site, mainly because there has always been the threat of development and in the area to the left of the original main entrance there were still floor tiles etc where some of the buildings would have been. I've been in the loft today and found a pdf document of the history of Norton Aerodrome written by Group Capt DJ Read (Ret'd) that he sent to me a few years ago. I can't recall how I came across him, maybe on here or on Sheffield Forum? Anyway, I contacted
    2 points
  7. The current weather in Yorkshire reminded me of another 'Norton ' memory which occurred during the 1962/3 Xmas period . I received a telegram at home (West London ) telling me to get back to camp on 31st December . That was the first and last telegram I've ever had ! As you may know there was a major snow event across the southern half of England and I had to set off up the (new ) M1 in my 1956 Vauxhall car not knowing how far I would get. The major roads had in fact been cleared somewhat , leaving walls of snow on the sides. To my surprise when I reached Derby area there wasn't much sno
    2 points
  8. Okay, so, I have tried not to count the ones you have already mentioned above, and this is what I have got so far: William Lawson, '2' (Hornby) Thomas Black '49' (Bachmann, triple set with next two wagons) Tinsley Park Collieries '2241' (as above) Newton Chambers '3751' (as above) Renishaw Iron '917' (Oxford Rail) Nunnery Colliery '1574' (limited edition, by Bachmann for Geoffrey Allison) Manchester & Sheffield Tar Works '19' (limited edition, by Bachmann for Rails) Sheffield & Ecclesall Co-op 'No 13' (limited edition, by Dapol for unknown)
    2 points
  9. I think we have but it is excellent - I was looking at a couple of those houses on Abbeyfield and on Scott Road and thought there was something unusual about them. I was also wondering how they windened the Workhouse gates and seeing the photo on here I realised there were double gate posts and they have removed the inner set!
    2 points
  10. Hi Athy, I've not heard 'Like Knitting Sand' or 'Plaiting Fog...' before. When I worked for Derbyhire CC in the early 90's one of my colleagues used to say 'It's Like Knitting Fog!' She was usually referring to the complete nonsense which senior people came out with in meetings. Another expression which came out of those meetings was 'Purposeful Dithering'. I little later on another 'bright spark' came up with 'Bullshit Bingo'. Everytime somebody came out with a nonsense expression in a meeting he would tick a card and then when he had a straight line shout 'House'. Unfortunately none of
    1 point
  11. Looks like George William Rusling of 206 Brook Hill in 1911. In 1896 the Rusling Brothers plumbing business based at 32 Spital Hill had been dissolved and brother Charles Oakes Rusling set up on his own at 62 Spital Hill. By the time of his death in 1935 George was at 44 Leavygreave Road, though he died at 1 Rutland Park. In his spare time George was chapel steward at the Carver Street chapel and was one of the original members of the Sheffield Methodist Council. George's wife Ann helped in the shop and son George was also a plumber, in fact when George junior died in 1978 he had been a "D
    1 point
  12. I worked just around the corner, so found it very convenient, plus there were most often no queues to worry about.
    1 point
  13. A.V.E.C. (AUDIO VISUAL ELECTRONIC CONTRACTORS) LIMITED was a Private Limited Company, registration number 01598462, established in United Kingdom on the 19. November 1981. The company was in business for 24 years and 7 months. The business of the company by SIC and NACE code was "6312 - Storage and warehousing". It was "DISSOLVED VIA VOLUNTARY STRIKE-OFF" from the 18th July 2006.
    1 point
  14. Hanbidge advert from a 1929 tram & bus timetable.
    1 point
  15. 1 point
  16. Fuller's earth is a type of clay which as well as its ancient use for fulling was also used as a beauty aid and for household cleaning. It would have been a familiar site in the first half of the 20C. Therefore the saying is contrasting "this earth" (the real world) and "fuller's earth" (somewhere else, possibly a mythical place). I suspect therefore that your mother's saying translates to "I don't know where I am".
    1 point
  17. "Rub 'im down wi potted mayt"
    1 point
  18. Steve..... Thank you so much and what a wonderful coincidence that passing the shop is what my dad, were he still alive, would be pleased to see, a Robert's tram car....
    1 point
  19. "Brittania" ,70000 ,itself pulled a special train into the Vic hauling a trainload of dignatories for the official opening of the electrified line to Manchester!
    1 point
  20. Hi Edmund Thank you As a result of your suggestions I have been able to locate it with help from St Maries Church in Southport
    1 point
  21. Probably the nickname for the house "the old palace" refers to its connection with Bishop Blythe, as in a Bishop's Palace. From Armitage's 1910 "Chantry Land": There is a reproduction of a watercolor on page 42 which is the same house that Botham painted, information about the picture reads: House, demolished probably in 1810, which stood a little to the south of Norton House. From a water-colour drawing, copied, about 1877, by the late Miss S.E. Addy, from an original in the possession of the Rev. H.H. Pearson. The copy belongs to Mr Sidney Oldall Addy, M.A., by whom permission to
    1 point
  22. My dad Albert Hancock was a driver, mainly on the 17/24 Tinsley - Millhouses route from mid 30s to 1959. His conductress, I'm told, was Edie M.......an. I have his 1950s safe driving medals. He used to tell me about not being able to get his tram through the town centre on the night of the Blitz. He must have seen lots, taking men to work in the east end at all hours. He was very proud of his uniform and looking smart. Cold work driving those trams - he was a big man, 6' 3". I seem to have seen a photo of him in his tram in a book at some point, but don't know now where it is. I recall
    1 point
  23. Hi just to introduce myself, my name is Arthur Wild and a born and bred Sheffielder. Born in Neepsend behind Stones brewery I subsequently lived on Wybourn (rehoused after the Gale), the Manor finally finishing up on Parkhill Flats. Starting work as a timed served electrician I then joined the Royal Air Force in which I served for 22 years. I married a Doncaster girl so now I reside in Doncaster but I’m Sheffield through and through. I loved my life in Sheffield and I’m fixated with the changes both good and bad that have happened in the city. My my biggest disappointment is the
    1 point
  24. I'm so glad to have found this forum! I've been collecting Sheffield table knives on and off for 20 years and could never find anyone else with similar interests. Most of my collection are stainless steel i.e. WW1 or later. I have 49 different makers and the knives are mounted in picture frames. I keep a record of where I bought them, markings on the knife and how much they cost - markets, garage sales etc. I have spares of: James Marsden and Sons Chris Johnson and Co A.E. Thompson and Son Leppington Cutlers Ltd if any other collectors want to swap
    1 point
  25. Yes I went past at the weekend and it was halfway through being demolished.
    1 point
  26. I recall when pub and community were closely aligned, however when the pub landlord is replaced by a manager there is little chance of him/her having the community commitment that a landlord would (in my experience) see as being part and parcel of their business.
    1 point
  27. This lady is now well into her nineties, her name is Harriet Dowson and I had the pleasure of knowing her when we both worked at George Butlers Cutlass Works on Sidney Street.
    1 point
  28. May be a "G" rather than a "C" or maybe not.... Charles Peachey builder was the son of Goy Peachey (a builder), from a family of builders, grandfather John Peachey and great grandfather Samuel Peachey. The Peacheys were based around Hunters Bar - 68 Sharrow Lane in 1887, 149 Club Garden Road in 1898, 1 Steel Road in 1901 , 45 Walton Road in 1902, Lynton Road in 1906, 117 Psalter Lane in 1909, Clifford Road in 1920, 35 Wayland Road in 1931. It's not clear where the christian name "Goy" came from.
    1 point
  29. It's a gorgeous building! 😍 - The negative is from knowing it's past association with death, poverty, the misery and stigma of no choice; it's not the building itself? Imagine it's a library or town hall.. (I find 'modern'/60s style blocks to be the scary ones! The new construction in town so unnecessarily ugly and demoralising, squatting over like they're arrogantly intended to say your city's history never mattered) - My relatives share the N'Gen aversion, the spookiness that most raised in 20thC Sheffield feel about the place, though one who worked there years also liked that the grounds ar
    1 point
  30. Here it is. Its the former home of Mayor William Fawcett 1855 - 56, its on Clarke Drive and is CLARKE HOUSE after which Clarkehouse Road was named.
    1 point
  31. Then and now: Went to the open weekend last September (2020) it was nice to sit outside enjoying a pint just watching the world go by, "every one social distancing i might add"
    1 point
  32. Better late than never! Just discovered another VR pillar box on Priory Road, Sharrow (Sharrow Lane end). Adding extant VR pillar boxes to Time Walk map. Now that old phone boxes are being listed, I wonder if pillar boxes will too at some point?
    1 point
  33. He's as thick as two short planks! Tha can grow spuds in thi 'ear oiles ther that loppy! Es that mean e wouldn't gi thi snot offern is nooz! Thar as much use as a chocolate fireguard! Gerrup afore tha takes root! This beers as flat as a fart! It im round ears wi a piece of 4 x 2. Ther off luckin fer gusset! ( NE Derbyshire) Thers moor life in't cemetry than in this battery! It's black oer ar Bill's. Es not a full shilling! To be going on with.🧐
    1 point
  34. 308 London Road at the corner of Ward Place https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/
    1 point
  35. Hmmm, "guy" is reported from 1375 in the sense of "a guide", from the Old French "guion". Even soccer appears from the OED to be English c. 1885. It gets really annoying at times; many so-called Americanisms are actually older forms of English English. Possibly the most famous one is "gotten", which appears in Wycliffe's Bible of 1382.
    1 point
  36. That picture shows the wrong bridge, that is the one linking Meadowhall to the Interchange, the one in the still from the film is the other part that runs from the Interchange to the railway car parks. The signs on the wall on the right are opposite the entrance to platform 1. Nigel L
    1 point
  37. I think I have seen some photos of Manor Park estate under construction on the Picture Sheffield website. Just search "Manor Park" there.
    1 point
  38. Work has been going on some time and it really looks like they're making solid progress digging down to the castle ruins and bringing it to the surface.
    1 point
  39. Right on the corner where Subway stands now (at the time of writing)
    1 point
  40. Many will 'know' Jack Wrigley from his brilliant 'Sheffield Camera' book series, which detailed photos from his archives across many areas of Sheffield. He was also a member of the Sheffield History site for a while. Sadly news has reached me of his passing, just a few days before his 94th birthday. We've Jack to thank for documenting lots of Sheffield places back to the 1950s via an incredible collection of photographs, and for sharing them via his great books (and some on this website in the past). A small selection of some of his book covers: RIP Jack
    1 point
  41. Does this provide any more info on AA sites around Sheffield? http://www.anti-aircraft.co.uk/HAA_gun_sites_map.html Doesn’t work for me on iPad, as it needs user to hover mouse pointer over locations....
    1 point
  42. Before he was called up into the RAF my Dad, as a member of the Home Guard, manned one of the "Z" rocket batteries on Shirecliffe ( He is on one of the battery photos). He always said that when fired they did more damage ( shrapnel) to the City than any intruding Luftwaffe aircraft.
    1 point
  43. Normally the books are available for sale in the hospitals charity shop in the Huntsman entrance of the Northern General hospital but I am not sure if it is open at the moment. 2 on the workhouse and one about the on and off site children's homes too.
    1 point
  44. I'm not 100% I think it's going to be opened up as an open space for relaxing - a bit like The Peace Gardens, and hopefully with some of the castle features on show. I think that's what I heard - I'd need to check up and find out
    1 point
  45. Fir Vale Workhouse looked a really intimidating and worrying place from the outside. Quite a dramatic building
    1 point
  46. Not the 60s / 70s but the birth of the Millhouses pool: The Ministry of Health sanctioned a loan of £10,500 for the pool to be repaid over 30 years. It was under construction in March 1929 and the Parks and Burial Grounds Committee agreed that admission should be free, but there would be charges for towels etc. Mixed bathing would be allowed and the pool would not open on Sundays. In June the specification was altered to make it suitable for water polo (the 6 foot deep area was increased to allow polo to be played crosswise) but it was found that the depth could not be increased from the
    1 point
  47. Chapeltown railway station. Now been moved to the side of the Asda.
    1 point
  48. Here are a couple of then and now photo's of Chapeltown & Thorncliffe Railway station
    1 point
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