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  1. Yes I bought my first work suite in 1952 there….
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  2. My grandparents came from Dublin too, part of the family were rubbing shoulders with the men who shaped the Irish Free State. My childhood was peppered with Irish words which I wasn’t aware of then but now I know them, two of them were Cac and Skoil, look them up. The commemorative stamp shows my two Great uncles. Michael was shot fighting the British in the 1916 Easter rising and William was killed on the Somme fighting for the British, his body was never found.
    2 points
  3. Thanks so much Steve!!! Thats what I was looking for!!!!!!
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  5. Hi Folks, I’m hoping that someone on the forum can supply me with information about several small grindstones (?) that I have found in the Sheffield rivers over the past couple of years. I fly-fish these rivers, frequently wading through stretches which are simply not visible or accessible from roads or footpaths, and I often come across interesting relics from Sheffield’s industrial past. Chief among these are discarded grindstones, some 16” – 18” across and 12” – 14” deep, presumably thrown in from former grinding ‘wheels’ when they became too small for their specific use (e.g. scythe grinding). I’ve also found evidence of these stones having been split in half and continuing to be used for smaller work — pocket knives, forks and so on. It’s fair to say that I’ve now become passionately interested in how, when and where the various shapes and sizes of stones were employed, and have sought to find as much information online as I possibly can… some older posts on this forum being extremely helpful in this respect. I think I can say that I now have a reasonable grasp on the basics of the subject. However, I have in possession (they were small enough to bring home in a rucksack) some stones that I can find no information about whatsoever. They bear little resemblance to ‘normal’ grindstones, either in size or shape, so perhaps their purpose was not grinding at all, but some other industrial process? The square shafted holes suggest (I think) that they’ve been in the river for quite some time… Stone number 1: diameter - 7”; depth – 2”; hole – 2” square shaft. This stone is not symmetrical — it has an edge indent/shape. Stone number 2: diameter – 9”; depth – 2 ½”; hole – 2 ¼” square shaft. This stone is perfectly flat on one side, but is rounded and has an edge indent on the other. Stone number 3: diameter – 9”; depth – 2 ½”; hole – 3” square shaft. This stone is symmetrical, slightly rounded on both edges and exhibits shallow grooves in the ‘grinding’ surface. Stone number 4: diameter – 10 ½”; depth – 1 ½” (at centre); hole – 2 ¼” square shaft. This stone is perfectly flat on one side but rounded and very worn on the other. Pajod.
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  6. I could open mine with a penknife. 😤
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  7. Sorry, a bit of a mix-up between posts… Until very recently, I haven't been keeping any records of exactly where and when I find each stone, but I have a pretty good memory. I'm still researching the industrial hubs that could have utilised this type of stone… The small ‘grindstones' in question were found in the River Don, between Neepsend and the Wicker. The bed of the river throughout this stretch probably contains more man-made detritus than natural stone: discarded building bricks are the predominant feature…
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  8. Hi Athy, You're right - it was a long time ago! The name 'Morrell' rings a bell, I wonder if she had a sister/brother whose about my age (69yrs), who went to Gleadless PS? Cheers, Wazzie Worrall.
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  9. Here are 2 quite old photos taken at coaling area of Grimesthorpe shed
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  10. No Grimesthorpe was a depot. There's some pictures of it in the Rail Centres Sheffield No11 book. Uploaded here:
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  11. Taking my young children on holiday in the 1970s to Brittany ,they were shocked to see the “lovely rabbits”in a run at the bottom of the gites garden being necked one Sunday morning,Obviously rabbit stew was still a favoured dish across La Manche!
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  12. Born in the late 1940's, I can remember rationing coupons. Dad and grandfather had a fairly big allotments, with greenhouses. There were also up to three pigs, as well as dozens of hens and a few ducks and geese plus their eggs. There was plenty of room for growing greens and other staples such as strawberries and gooseberries. However, the more mundane, cabbage, cauliflower, lettuce, tomatoes, radish, green beans, onions, turnip, parsnip, potato, rhubarb and sprouts grew in abundance enough to keep our three families well-fed. The sprouts would crop, about the beginning of November, just in time for mother to get them on, the boil for Christmas. Dad built me a small version of his garden single wheel, wheelbarrow and I would often be sent down to get items from the allotment. We gave names to the pigs, ducks and chickens and on occasion the name would crop up while eating. But we were never squeamish about it. From time to time, the veg would be used to barter for other things, so much was home-made and home cooked. We also kept a couple of dogs down the allotment to ward off intruders. If anyone came around, the dogs would sound off and dad and his brothers would turn out like the cavalry. They would chase them across the fields to the river, which they would have to swim voluntarily or otherwise. Dad said he always knew who had been around the allotment, as they were cleaner than usual. My favourite snack was a bread cake with pork dripping and a cup of tea. Which I still enjoy today as a special treat. I knew where all the fruit trees were in the area and a bit of judicious scrumping would take place for apples, pear and greengage, which I told everyone that they were plums and not ripe yet. Blackberries were collected in the season and were often made in blackberry and apple pies, though my preference was always for rhubarb and apple. It has been 50+ years since I last went down to the allotment, but I do drive over it today from time to time. I suppose that's progress.
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  13. I came across this 1939 Star newspaper article about Norton Hammer "Mystery Picture" on find my past. This Picture Sheffield photograph shows roughly the location he`s talking about. The 1851 census calls it the Little London Works, the two houses at the top of the photo are on Chesterfield Road, to the left you can make out the levels of the railway lines, could the hill in the background with three poles be the brick yard he talks about?
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  14. I remember eating tripe with vinegar it had to be honeycomb tripe from the fish market my mum used to fry it with onions and gravy but I could only eat it raw
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  15. My Dad liked tinned salmon but it was treat usually once a month or so, but this itself brought a bit of a problem , before stainless steel cutlery was widely available the cutlery was usually chrome plated nickel and through years of use the chrome wore away showing the nickel, but besides this problem all spoon and forks had a metal taste more so when the chrome had wore off and washing them after eating salmon didn’t remove the smell of fish from the cutlery and knives so the solution was to take your cutlery outside and just stick them in the earth for a couple of hours and hey presto, the smell and taste of fish had disappeared, it was exactly the same way an earth toilet worked, the availability of stainless steel cutlery meant no more smelly cutlery.
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  16. I lived with my grandparents until we got our own home when I was 10. Grandad was an engine driver and he frequently went to Grimsby where he would go to fish docks and buy a parcel which would be placed in a bucket of cold water on the footplate and brought home. I ate skate, conger eel, lots of herring which was ‘. soused “ by G ranny. ( no idea how). Healso went to ,Leicester where he brought home very soft Walls ice cream which was virtually unobtainable at time in S heffield.
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  17. Tomorrow sees the official launch of the Sheffield Digital Knife archive the most comprehensive resource to look up if your family surname is on a Sheffield Table Knife Blade
    1 point
  18. You’ve lived a sheltered life if you’ve never heard of pack up, my dad took a mashing of tea screwed up in newspaper, it consisted of tea, sugar and condensed milk, the tea and sugar covered the milk so it didn’t stick to the paper. Happy days.
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  19. Wasn't chitterlings and bag the cow's stomach? The bag being the outer casing perhaps. Dad would always grumble about his pack up. Especially on the days mum supposedly packed him up liver sausage. This conversation was often repeated on a weekly basis. 'What were that tha' packed up today?' 'Liver sausage, why, what wer up wi' it?' questioned mum always on the defensive. 'D'in't bloody taste like it. More like potted dog.' Occasionally she would pack liver sausage up for him just to keep up the pretence that it was the shop getting it wrong. Potted 'dog' (meat) and 'pink lint' were cheap sandwich fillers. (Luncheon meat). There was a rhyme we used to recite that went like this. 'Little dog, busy street, Motor bus, potted meat.'
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  20. Not exactly what you asked for @Youdy, but it's the only relevant newspaper article that I could find.
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  21. Tozzins right about it being off topic, and away from where we started, but I must say it is fantastic to see these personal stories. I particularly liked the drinking of tea from the saucer, it reminded me of my grandad Roy Bownes who did just that and I had totally forgotten about it. Maybe I should start another topic about "Local habits from yesteryear!"
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  22. Same here, I worked at David Mellor Design in Hathersage for ten terrible years, they supplied your cups of tea for your breaks, they used cups and saucers and for me just being a cutlery worker who’s never used a saucer in my life, so after around two weeks I stopped using the saucer and the manager wasn’t best pleased, “ you might spill tea on the floor” now this was a cutlery making and polishing area, I affective dust extraction so dirt was everywhere, I pointed this visible fact and told him “ I don’t use a saucer at home and I’m certainly not using one in my workplace” after around three weeks only the manager and the cleaner were saucer users. Once a mug of tea always a mug of tea.
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  23. Growing up on a Council estate in 1940/50s Sheffield, my family had....breakfast, dinner, tea and supper..... none of your fancy "lunch", "afternoon tea" or even "morning coffee" . 🙂
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  24. I spent three years there as a student in the 1970s. The first year I lived in the castle and could see the cathedral's tower from my bedroom. Roger Whittaker sums up a lot of people's feelings about Durham: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a9XcuN5hZwk
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  25. ‘Expressions’ are normally used more by ‘older people’ because they have been around longer than younger people and have absorbed far more than them, when the younger people become ‘older people’ they will do just the same.
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  26. Correct, it was often used by someone who wanted to denigrate someone who he (only ever heard it used by a man, on a man) decided was inferior to him. As for clothing, this master of the English might use something like ‘tha looks like a rag man’s dummy’, we really have a way with words don’t we? 😅
    1 point
  27. Yeah, pretty much except they were models rather than staff members on their break. I never went in the cafe, but they used to wander around the rest of the shop to advertise the womens clothing department. in the 1980s and 90s
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  28. Ian - I sent you a private message with Debbie's email adress so you can conatct her. Lyn
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  29. I still have the bible and would still like to pass it on to any surviving family members.
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  30. It's an unusual name. I wonder if there's a connection to the John Vessey firm https://www.gracesguide.co.uk/File:Im19211203IM-JohnVessey.jpg that was based on Denby Street, Sheffield 2?
    1 point
  31. While just wandering round Town with a camera, I found myself in the Cathedral grounds so I started reading the gravestones that are now used as paving stones, a practice I detest, these stones represent the life and death of the people who were lain beneath them, I realise that the bodies of the deceased have been moved but the families who paid for these stones did so because of these sad events in life, thought that their loved ones would sleep in their final resting place forever along with their headstones which would briefly tell the reader about the persons interred below, but this outrage has been done and cannot be undone. One of the gravestones I came across was for three children of William & Elizabeth Westnedge who lived a few yards away from the what was then the parish church on Townhead Street, the three children are James aged 9 who died on May 23rd 1832, Jacob aged six who died on the 7th of June 1838 & Michael who succumbed to death on the 10th of September 1838 aged 13, could you imagine the pain of loosing three sons, two of them within four months of each other, I was so touched by William and Elizabeth’s sad loss, the inscription on the stone would not leave me so I decided to find out as to what took their children away, I managed to get the death certificates of Michael and Jacob also known as William, I didn’t manage to get the certificate for James but Michaels cause of death was Decline which was the word the Medical profession used for Tuberculosis which gives a hint in what conditions they were living in, Jacob contracted Measles which was a serious child killer as it is to-day, I suspect that James may have died of Cholera but I cannot be sure of that but the Cholera epidemic was in 1832 the year of James death , that is just a suspicion on my part. On William Jacobs death certificate, it cites the his mother Elizabeth was the informant of his death and it graphically shows Elizabeth’s illiteracy as she could only make her mark in the register “X” Elizabeth was the informant for Michael too, so it seems even in mourning William her husband had to go to work to earn money, no grievance leave in those days, Williams trade was that of a Tailor and it seems as though he had a brother named George who in turn was a Tailor and his wife Caroline gave him at least eight children and on researching William and Elizabeth it seems they had just as many children and lost good deal more while their children were in infancy but William and Elizabeth did try to make their lot a bit better by moving from the slums to the south of the town after the loss of these three children whilst living in Townhead street but disease lurks everywhere and death knocked for their children no matter where they lived. A Tailor was a good trade to be in in the 1800s so I suspect that either William and his brother George set up shop for themselves or worked for the same employer but being a Tailor didn’t make you well off , they probably earned just enough to keep debt away from the door and I don’t think it was their choice to live in the town, the slums and hovels were terrible places to live and try to bring up children, Pigs, Cows and Sheep roamed around town dropping there mess everywhere which didn’t help the bad air of the town. Disease was rife and Cholera hit Sheffield in July 1832 and 1,347 of the townsfolk were hit by the disease of those 402 died and some of the victims were buried in the Cholera grounds on Norfolk Road, the rest were buried in the General Cemetery. With Sheffield being an industrial town and most of the works in the and around the town centre the air was a desperate thing to breathe , plumes of foul smelling black smoke shot out of all the chimneys of the firms but even at home children could not escape the foul air as most cutlery and edge tool makers had a little workshop at home where the children learnt the trade from a young age, most of them didn’t go to school as the penny a week that it cost to educate a child was just a bit to much to pay, if you had four or five children going to school that five pence could be better spent on food and clothes so the education they received was taught in the streets and lanes and in the pubs of the town. The Crofts of the town were the worse of the worst places to live and they housed the desperately poor of the town, in one account a family lived in a cellar basement with five children and human waste was piled up against the outside wall which there room was situated below, the excrement was over eight feet high and the run off from this horrible mess seeped through the walls into the cellar basement, but what could they do? They couldn’t move, they couldn’t complain, it was a situation they had to live with and now perhaps you can get a vision of the lives of these unfortunate people. There are cases of Mothers committing Infanticide as the burden of trying to care for children was a cross that was to hard to bear, keeping in mind birth control wasn’t available to them, so to be pushed to committing the act of killing your child just to alleviate the pressure on caring for the other child members of a large family, children were a burden to some families unfortunately. Doctors were available but were out of reach of the pockets of the poor, so it was home remedies which was their only option and the power of prayer and the church that had to suffice, that’s all they had, I can fully understand but not justify why men and women spent money on the demon drink, it was a way of forgetting there predicament but it was also a way of not feeding their hungry children, in some cases animals faired better than children as they were worth money, children were sometimes thought of as a burden until they were of an age when they could get a job and bring money into the home. Look at any old photos of the late 1800s that show children and take note of their feet most of the time they have no shoes on and they are dressed in rags, if there were photos in the early part of the century I’m sure they would have looked much worse, these children were never really treated as children, they had no toys, no schooling but they were expected to work from a very early age, going down the mines at ten years of age and over, working with dangerous machinery in the forges and factories of the town, and anyone who lived near Arundel Street, Arundel Lane area had to contend with the foul smell of the Gas Works that operated there but gas was a necessary part of 19th century life. Between the years of 1837 to 1842 a survey was undertaken for the causes of death in the Sheffield registration district and over the five years the biggest killer was Consumption which claimed 1,604 victims of all ages, the next one was inflammation of the lungs which killed 874, on the survey there are several causes of death which are totally unheard of nowadays for instance decay of nature which turns out to be Dementia, Scrofula which is T.B. of the neck, Marasmus which is malnutrition and Apoplexy that’s bleeding of the organs. There were 426 deaths attributed to Dentition which relates to the growth of teeth, I don’t know for the life of me how that could kill people. On the survey there are 73 causes of death and the saddest to me is want of food, in anybody’s language that’s starvation. You can peruse the causes of death yourself on the survey printed with this story also there is a copy of a church flyer dated 1891, please take note of the deaths at the foot of the page and you can read the shocking event that befell John and Clara Effingham of 48 Sylvester Street, on three consecutive days, the 6th, the 7th & 8th of August 1891 their three children died, Leonard aged 2 years and 2 months, next was Elizabeth aged 7 years and 9 months finally Alice aged 5 years and 11 months, try and put yourself into John and Clara shoes, their hearts must have been wrenched from their bodies, to lose one child is tragic but to lose three in three days is just to hard to comprehend, the outpouring of grief must have been tremendous. So when you complain of a runny nose or a simple cold think of these people who had to endure the worst of times, no Doctors, no National Health, no 999 all they had was prayer and the trust in God, even though I would love to return to these early years mentioned in this script I’m glad I wasn’t born in those hard times and please don’t think this is just my insight of those years, my own Irish Great Grandfather and Great Grandmother had eleven children in Dublin between the years 1874 & 1890 and they lost seven of them under the age of three to consumption or Tuberculosis as its known nowadays, it was just that they lived in the exact same conditions as William and Elizabeth Westnedge and their children, so disease doesn’t have borders and it isn’t choosey, anyone was fair game. One thing I do ask if anyone is touched or can understand the hardship of the Westnedge family highlighted in this brief look back into time, if you find yourself near the Cathedral in Church Street take a bloom or a bunch of flowers and lay it on their gravestone, its on the East Parade side of the Cathedral, I realise their remains have been moved elsewhere but I like to think their presence remains there in some way, near the area where they lived and died.
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  32. Totally agree with that. I can't see it being that dangerous too. It could be done when they are being removed. These days with digital cameras it's cheap too. Of course a lot of the stones would be unreadable, but that doesn't stop you taking them that are not. The only problem that I can foresee is graves covered with brambles. And overturned stones, but if you are clearing them away the stones would need to be lifted by a team of people anyway. Besides it's more efficient than transcribing and faster! No spelling mistakes and the style of text and size, showing what was important and what not so is shown on the stone, plus the kind of stone used and if it was expensive. Telling you how rich the family was. You can't get that from somebody writing down the inscription. Examples of expensive graves and cheap ones below:
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  33. I’ve always been appalled by the complete disregard shown by the people responsible for using the headstones as ordinary flagstones, a loved ones visual reminder of a life that has ended naturally or by illness or accident, shame on the person or persons who came up with idea and just to widen a road.
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  34. Just had a day in Sheffield, talking with Mum (84). She and Dad used to go to the Haychatter regularly in the 1950s. Quite a trip from Wincobank. The landlady was Mary, she thinks. The opening hours weren't full as a normal pub, but mostly weekends and later on in the evenings for the farmworkers. The landlady was not very good with money and used to get mixed up giving change. It was fairly routine to get charged for a half when she'd given you a pint. There was a piano, and when it the pub was busy, and the piano playing was upsetting Mary's arithmetic, she would go across and slam the lid down on the player's fingers, shouting at them "Yer maddlin' me, shurrup!" On one occasion, after a pleasant winter's evening in there, Mum and Dad got most of the way back to Wincobank, when Dad says "This isn't our car!" Mum says " What do you mean, of course it is?". Dad: "Ours doesn't have a clock - this one does!" They had to go all the way back and swap it, and left wondering if the owner would be baffled with it starting so well, with it still being warm. And one hot summer day, parents and friends decided to have a jug of Pimms. Mary supplied just a jug half full of Pimms liqueur and a bottle of lemonade. When Dad complained that a Pimms had lots of fruit in it, Mary's answer was "Not here it doesn't!"
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  35. The Baths had a long and difficult path to being built, stretching from 1874 to its opening in 1896. August 1874: Town Council inspected the proposed site of the Free Library and Baths November 1874: Arrangements were being made for the laying of the foundation stone of the Upperthorpe Free Library and Baths by Alderman Jessop. It appears that the baths were not actually built for some reason. August 1878: A public meeting was held to arrange to push the Council to use the land at the side of the Free Library for baths. September 1878: a plan for the proposed baths was available and was referred to the Bath sub-committee. October 1883: There was still debate about the baths – it was pointed out that Attercliffe baths was losing £500 per annum. January 1891: It was proposed that a Baths sub-committee be formed. February 1891: At the quarterly Town Council meeting Mr R Nicholson said that his constituents “were desirous of obtaining the same facilities as other parts of the town for washing themselves (Laughter)”. As regards Attercliffe baths he thought that “the Improvement Committee must have had something to do with building them (Laughter)”. A committee was appointed. Over the next few months the committee’s remit expanded to include the provision of baths at Brightside and Park. June 1894: The committee reported. Within a half mile radius of the proposed site there were 10,865 houses, only 116 with baths. It was recommended that part of the leasehold land next to the library should be used, and that the council adopt the plans drawn up by the Borough Surveyor, which showed a building with a swimming bath, 30 slipper baths, and a caretaker’s house. The cost was not to exceed £5,238. March 1892: The proposal was still being debated in council meetings. Councillor Sharman raised doubts about the estimated cost. Mr Leader said “there had been a great deal of curiosity …as to the author of a celebrated bathing story concerning a man who had missed his annual bath, but they had that day discovered it was Mr Sharman (Laughter)” January 1893: The proceeds of a sale of land next to Attercliffe baths had raised £400, and this was to be applied to the purchase of a piece of land at Upperthorpe for baths. The building then happened quickly and with little comment. On 19th May 1896 the Independent had an advertisement for the opening of the baths: And on the 23rd May, reported the opening and gave some details:
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  36. I took these photos about 15 years ago - do you call this area Portobello? It was no longer being used for worship and building work was taking place so that the university could use the building for other uses. My great grandparents were married here in 1862.
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  37. 147 Portobello Street, Benjamin Pickford (not named, but it's the Wilow; predates my data)
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  38. Both my parents grew up in the parish of St. Georges and were married there in 1950. Between the end of the Second World War and my dad being called up for National Service (so between 1945 and 1947) when my dad was about 16 or 17 he played for St. George's football team. Here is the 1946 -7 team. Dad is the goalkeeper, - the little guy at the back.
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  39. Another photo of St Georges
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