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  1. 5 points
    Hi all, so glad I found this site, so much history in one place. I was born at walkley in 65, moved to Bubwith rd Brightside where my mum was born and grandparents lived. From there we lived in a cottage in Roe Woods, my dad became one of the first 6 park patrollers, on motorbikes, in Sheffield while at Roe Wood. From there we moved to Shiregreen where mum still lives. Dad was born at the bottom end of Bellhouse rd. Have lived in a few places in Sheffield and now 20 years in Chesterfield. Looking forward to reading lots more and to dig up some of my own memories and photos to share with everyone. :-))
  2. 4 points
    Here is one of my Grandfather's glass slides of High Street that looks to be taken from about the same place
  3. 4 points
    Last year's thread and I rediscovered this 35mm slide which seems to fit appropriately into this one.Taken in June 1963 when rear loaders were favourite and steam locos much in evidence at Midland Station.
  4. 3 points
    Many thanks for the comments on the maps we have been uploading to Picture Sheffield recently. The City Archives and Local Studies Library has a wonderful collection comprising thousands of maps dating from the 16th century onwards. We are trying to give the collection a higher profile and make it available to as many people as possible. The maps are scanned at exactly the same resolution as the photographs. The difference however comes from the need to compress very large maps down to a size where they fit on a computer screen. In the light of recent comments however we have reviewed how we process the map images. The zoomed image is now larger and presented in a higher quality format. Hopefully this allows you to see more detail without slowing down the performance of Picture Sheffield. We are currently working our way through all of the map images on Picture Sheffield to improve them. The series prefixed ‘arc’ is complete. The other main set of maps (prefixed ‘y’) should be complete within a few weeks. As well as viewing the maps on Picture Sheffield the originals remain available at the City Archives and at the Local Studies Library in the Central Library should you wish to consult them. We welcome everyone who wishes to use the service in person or online. If you have any further comments or suggestions feel free to contact me via archives@sheffield.gov.uk Peter Evans, Archives and Heritage Manager
  5. 3 points
    I've got several locations with pictures, but never seen an exposure as big as this one. 4 lines into 2? Any other geeks might want to keep an eye out down there, as they are redeveloping it, so more might be uncovered. Exchange Place into Blonk Street
  6. 3 points
    We believe we have the only pre-war Guy Vixen still in existence, please tell me if you know of another, this is a 1938 and will be seen at all the local rally's
  7. 3 points
    My grandfather was a keen amateur photographer who died before I was born. My father had a box of his 3" glass slides that I inherited and have now digitised. Unfortunately only 2 are of Sheffield street scenes. Many of them are in the Yorkshire dales. There is even one that he took in Bruges and took one from the same bridge in Bruges to prove it. I have uploaded Fitzalan square previously. "Blade forging" was written on the other picture and may be my Grandmother's family.
  8. 3 points
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  9. 3 points
    Hello , I`m Kate , thanks for letting me join . Although I have lived in Cornwall for many years , I was born in Sheffield ( Derbyshire Lane ) and spent my youth in and around the city . I have particularly fond memories of the area around Meersbrook and Albert Road where my beloved grandparents lived , I spent a lot of time with them at number 178 , long demolished for some flats . I have old photos of their garden overlooking the Meersbrook and on up to the park , but sadly no one in the family has any photos of the front of the terrace on Albert Road . I would dearly love to visit Sheffield again but my husbands health is not good so I content myself with memories !
  10. 3 points
    From various Church magazines. St Cuthberts mid 1940s, St Hildas late 1960s, early 70s.
  11. 3 points
    Here is an extract from the 1950 OS survey Meersbrook Park in June 1963.
  12. 3 points
    Finally! I found an image showing the building that was shown on the far left of the original photograph. The white gable end with the double chimney appears to be connected with the Abbeydale Mill. At least I think that’s what the signage above the door reads? So, I believe this is the building that was shown with the purple circle in my earlier photo. http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;u03677&action=zoom&pos=6&id=38830&continueUrl= Some more images of the area, in both directions, in different decades.... http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12848&action=zoom&pos=41&id=15752&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12951&action=zoom&pos=43&id=15850&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s16449&action=zoom&pos=48&id=19166&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12850&action=zoom&pos=57&id=15754&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;w00051&pos=7&action=zoom&id=45420
  13. 3 points
    Made in Great Britain, BBC2, Series exploring how the craft and manufacturing skills have shaped Great Britain Friday 26th October, 2100 hrs. run time, 59 minutes . Episode 1 https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bpz4ks The makers experience Sheffield's transformation into an industrial powerhouse known as 'Steel City', famous throughout the world for making high quality steel and cutlery. In this episode, four craft-makers experience Sheffield's rapid transformation from a rural market town to an industrial powerhouse that built modern Britain known as 'Steel City'. Sheffield became famous throughout the world for making high quality steel blades and cutlery. Steph McGovern takes them through the ages and they are guided by local Sheffield cutler Corin Mellor. Starting in the 18th century, they are tasked with hand forging a scythe at Abbeydale Works. This farming tool found recent fame when used by a shirtless Poldark, but the makers discover it was one of Sheffield's biggest exports that launched Britain's steel industry. The process proves to be a hugely physical challenge. Next, they step into the heart of a Victorian production line to make cutlery stamped with the fashionable King's Pattern. Steph learns that the extravagant Victorian middle class had a different piece of cutlery for every type of food. They prepare the knives, forks and spoons ready for electroplating - 'blinging' up the cutlery by covering it in silver. The biggest innovations are yet to come. Travelling forward to the start of the 20th century, the makers learn that stainless steel was discovered in Sheffield, bringing affordable cutlery to the masses. They experience Sheffield's transformation into a war machine to defend Britain - making WWII Commando Knives using a heavy duty drop stamp. Now in the 21st century, Corin Mellor takes the makers to his state-of-the-art factory, David Mellor Design. Here, they make high-end stainless steel forks from one of factory's bestselling ranges. With the city's focus on quality rather than quantity, the craft-makers discover that Sheffield's historic cutlery industry is still thriving.
  14. 3 points
    I think this answers the question - Woodbourn Hotel FC - lots of press cuttings to piece the story together.
  15. 3 points
    I may be my age but to me "then" usually looks better than "now".
  16. 3 points
    Sheffield Council Planning Department want shooting for what they've done to The Moorfoot. I grew up in a little house just across the road from The S & E Co-op or The Arcade as it was known as. The 50s and the 60s it was a vibrant and bustling area from the town hall all the way down. It's an absolute crime and I could weep when I see what it's like today.
  17. 2 points
    1883 Sheffield, Yorkshire. Renewal of a Beer License. George Beeley, Eyre St Pub https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1883-Sheffield-Yorkshire-Renewal-of-a-Beer-License-George-Beeley-Eyre-St-Pub/392281450350?_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.MBE%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D20140122125356%26meid%3D006d32d975ef41fe88b26578eda198b4%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D2%26sd%3D372679726840%26itm%3D392281450350&_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851
  18. 2 points
  19. 2 points
    Its 25 years ago today (21st March 1994) that the Supertram opened for passengers. The first tram from Meadowhall carried the local dignitaries, press etc, and the second one carried those daft enough to get up early to get to Meadowhall for just after 6am, I was one of those! There was such a long queue of people going through the long winded procedure of buying a ticket at one machine and validating it at another, that the tram left late but with a full load. First journeys were Meadowhall to Commercial Street and when we arrived I got cornered by a Star photographer and ended up with my photo in that nights paper. Nigel L
  20. 2 points
    I've been uploading my old Sheffield footage again, with slightly better editing this time. I drove around Kelham Island earlier, and linked this to my new postings in here I'm glad I found this old recording from 2005. Although it's not exactly ancient history, I was originally just recording sections of the old ring road, but on way home, had decided to drive around Kelham Island - and glad I did now! It really shows the difference. I remember that the Alfred Beckett building being one of the first to be 'done up'. It reminds me that when I drove around there that it seemed like a risk to buy there, but could pay off (as I seen Manc/Birm old areas revamped), and if the area was done up well it would work. - I was disappointed recently though, that the building on Green Lane (before the old school building - on the right - in the film) didn't at least retain the front. (it's currently in building process - this one)
  21. 2 points
    Sorry I misunderstood. What I do is use the "unread content button" which should appear as on one of the pictures below , and when on the "unread content" page there should be a link top left or on the left of the same line to "activity". The activity page appears in order of date with latest activity first. You can also "mark the site read" so that old content that doesn't interest you will not appear in the unread content. "Mark the site read" in the top instance is in the menu extreme top right or in the second just to the right of unread content.
  22. 2 points
    modern 'journalism' at its finest. Hide behind youtube and stir some s***. It brought the city together, made us very proud to be sheffielders and remembered the lads who paid the ultimate sacrifice. who plants the bedding plants and sweeps up from time to time is of little or no consequence. I dont see what youre trying to achieve by posting it to be honest.
  23. 2 points
    Hi, I have recently moved to Sheffield, and come from Sussex originally however my maternal grandfather came from here, born in 1884. I'm interested in finding out more about his years here. He emigrated to Australia after the 2nd World War and died there in 1981. His name was George Huntley and grew up in Ecclesall. His father Kossuth Huntley worked on the railways. He married a Sheffielder named Mary Jane Padley in 1872. George Huntley rose to rank of Sergeant in WW1 and worked with a motorised ambulance convoy and was in the Somme in 1916/17. They are supposed to have been a well known family in their day but that was a long time ago. I have very few photos of the family but attach some here. George is in uniform pictured around 1915. His brother Louis here appeared in a 1928 article about the Charfield train accident in Gloucestershire in which their sister was killed. The sister who died, Clara Johnson, is also pictured as are their parents Kossuth Huntley and Mary Jane Padley George was a mechanical engineer and worked out of Norfolk Row between the wars where he was an agent for popular makes of cars and lorries of the day. Cheers, Alan Evans
  24. 2 points
    Census results for Albert Paulson 1901, 1911, 1939.
  25. 2 points
    Albert Paulson cutlery manufacturer, 28 Sidney Street, Sheff 1. (1957 Kelly's directory extract), Albert also appears in the 1965 edition, at the same address.
  26. 2 points
    On Ebay at the moment described as "1930 pages from ledger with letters and advertising and price list from George Wostenholm and sons Sheffield. With Scottish connection." and "Pages from old sheffield ledger of George Wostenholm & sons dated 1930/31 totals 4 letters and 3 advertisements and 1 postcard" https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/163543357592?ul_noapp=true https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/163543349893?ul_noapp=true
  27. 2 points
    Welcome KateR , I think you will find that you have come to the best place for Sheffield history and memories. I have fond memories of the Heeley and Meersbrook area having lived and worked round that area in a few locations from the late 40's to the late 70's . I have not got a picture of the front of that house but if I am right in saying that it was just past Brooklyn Road I think you will be able to pick it out on this 1935 aerial shot.
  28. 2 points
    Hello I was recently (and not unusually) in a charity shop looking at some teaspoons in an open cutlery sized cardboard box. I was “umming and ahing” about buying these 6 Victorian electroplated spoons that lacked any “meaningful” maker’s marks. That was until I turned the box lid over. I paid the money and the box (and the spoons) were mine. The image of the box lid is below, and that box had nothing to do with the contents. I was going to tack my photo on to somebody else’s thread, but I was astounded to not find that neither “Debesco Works” or the “Lewis Rose” concern that was based there, or “Roses” renowned owner are referenced on the forum. I already knew “stuff” about the “Debesco trademark” and “Lewis Rose Company Ltd” from another forum and the below illustrated spoon (that once might well have been covered by a box lid like that in my photo) is one of my own favoured spoons for making a coffee with. It seems from a Sheffield museums reference that the “Lewis Rose Company Ltd” was set up in 1922 by Isadore Lewis starting in the Mappin Buildings in Norfolk Street. Debesco was their trademark and Debesco Works was the name of a possible expanded workplace on Norfolk St. and Norfolk Lane (a P.S. about this later). There is elsewhere a reference also to a Debesco works on Eyre St. More clarification required please. My interest in Lewis Rose was with spoons and forks but below is some bladed interest. It is speculation on my part to suggest that the “Firth’s Stainless” knives in the photo may be pre WW2 while the knives with what appears to be a “Larko” Lewis Rose trademark could be post WW2. By the way who know what "whitening" is? My wife told me 1 option. The Spear & Jackson Company acquired Lewis Rose in 1969 but since the post WW2 period Lewis Rose had been using the “Ashberry” name in its production, as it had acquired Sheffield’s “Peter Ashberry&Sons” prior to WW2. I have given some ideas about Lewis Rose but any observations that can add to the story or contradict things are definitely required. But now why is there no reference on the forum to “Isadore Lewis, described by Sheffield’s Museums as Sheffield’s first Jewish Lord Mayor. Reference http://collections.museums-sheffield.org.uk/view/people/asitem/items@null:415/0?t:state:flow=34948cb9-a938-479b-b915-8bf7884dffb2 That was in 1963 and below is my last photo to show some of what his company was doing in the War years. That’s it fulfilling War Department broad arrow contracts facilitating our Army to march on its stomach. If there are any more “anoraks” like me, the 1942 item was a spoon and the 1944 item was a fork. The L.R.& Co. Ltd. has also been attributed elsewhere to Lewis Rose. Kalfred P.s. A little question here about Norfolk Lane. It does not appear on Google maps, but a Norfolk Row is there. Norfolk Lane addresses are to be found in “Sheffield Indexers” but latest address was 1925. Picturesheffield.com photos “shows rear” Howard Street and Norfolk Lane and Norfolk Lane from Howard St. I hope “Edmund” of cartography fame can help again.
  29. 2 points
  30. 2 points
    With respect, I'm not convinced that the photo is on Wostenholm Road? I found another image on PS from the opposite direction, at the junction with Priory Place and Albany Road, but several details in this image contradict the original (Catenary Poles on wrong side, wall and trees on Priory Place side, etc.) http://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s16495&amp;pos=4&amp;action=zoom&amp;id=19211 Looking at the tram routes of the time, the Tinsley <> Carbrook <> City <> Millhouses (and eventually Beauchief) route, I have a theory that this image might be at the end of Abbeydale Road, where it becomes Abbeydale Road South, at the junction of Archer (prev. Station) Road and Springfield Road. The junction looked a lot different then and some of the buildings have now gone, whereas others weren't even built. The tram tracks are single at this point and the catenary poles are on the right side (and the same design). I marked on a map where I think the photograph was taken from and in which direction (the orange arrow) The red circle is now the Abbey Frier (note the pitch of the roof, the upper windows and high lintels) The green circle are buildings that have been demolished when the junction was widened The blue circle shows the building that is now 'Chirofirst' (note the steep pitch of the roof and the top floor, double mullioned window) The purple circle is the building (now demolished) beyond the junction of Archer Road (the building that is now 'La Scala' restaurant is out of shot on the left) The last photo shows tram No.60 travelling in the opposite direction to the Millhouses terminus, with the buildings marked in the same colour coding. I may be mistaken, but the dip and slight bend in the road look right, as do the buildings that are visible in shot. Of course, I may be a million miles away, but maybe others have an opinion?
  31. 2 points
    Some photos of The Grand Hotel and surrounding area, the first two from 1926, the next five from 1951/2 and the last a modern aerial view, from approximately the same angle and height of the one before. You can see the site where ‘The Grand’ stood, but nothing visible remains of it, yet buildings immediately adjacent (and the garden on Barker’s Pool) still survive.
  32. 2 points
    Anyone living in any of these houses may be interested in this postcard on Ebay. ------------------- https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/173604248815?ul_noapp=true Google Street View -------https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.3837307,-1.4973794,3a,75y,81.23h,90.51t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s24w0G3NbxJMMlYOd7eyZgw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656?hl=en
  33. 2 points
    One of my Uncles was a driver with STD in the 1940's, the No 48 route was his favourite when it resumed after WW2. I recall he was particularly enthusiastic about two of the 1948 new Leyland PS2/1 Weymann bodied single-deckers numbered 188 and 192 referring to them as "Flyers". Apparently a day shift for the crew would start with a trip to Crosspool on the 55 route (Double-deck) then pick up the single-decker for a return trip with the 48 to Manchester. Presumably Townhead Street garage was the 'clocking-on' location and (at that time) Castlegate was the starting point for the 48. On Saturday 3rd December 1949 I travelled to Manchester on one of the three buses needed that day (two duplicates!). My return was by car so didn't make the scheduled 'Refreshment Stop' at the Dog & Partridge which I am sure was appreciated by many! I can only remember seeing Sheffield liveried buses on the route at that time.
  34. 2 points
  35. 2 points
    A great view of Sheffield on this 1915 post card currently offered on Ebay. Taken I think from Norfolk Park, that is certainly The Farm with I think possibly the park entrance and lodge on Norfolk Park Road bottom left. Plenty of famous Sheffield buildings across the middle including, (left to right) St. George's, St. Matthew's, The Albert Hall, St. Paul's, the Town Hall, Walker and Hall's and the Cathedral. ------------------- https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/382568503293?ul_noapp=true
  36. 2 points
    Yep, I’d agree with that @boginspro Lovely shot and lots of details of “Sheffield - At Rest”. However, I suspect it might prove a little trickier, identifying the location of the antithesis view of “Sheffield - At Work”? However, if you look just left of centre in the image, just above the three stubby chimneys, is that the Town Hall we can see through the murk? If it is, where would be within this distance and elevation? Pond Street area? Too close for Neepsend, but how about Moorfoot area? https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/RP-Postcard-Sheffield-at-Work-Judges/382568503669?_trkparms=aid%3D111001%26algo%3DREC.SEED%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20160727114228%26meid%3D08a9591ae0884af28b0bc03c16778356%26pid%3D100290%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D4%26sd%3D382568503669%26itm%3D382568503669&_trksid=p2060778.c100290.m3507
  37. 2 points
    I think you have the right angle there @boginspro and here’s a few photos from the same era, to help put the Cross Daggers in perspective..... The last photo is one in almost the exact reverse angle; The photographer is probably taking the shot from the corner of the square bay of The Royal Hotel. You can see the building on the left reversed and Coo Hill descending behind.... Sadly, my formative years were at the point where all this was being demolished and the ‘precinct’ replaced it. Although I lived a fair walk from ‘the village’, the precinct never really seemed to take off and only the Co-op kept it alive. When that moved to the top of Chapel Street, it was curtains for the precinct and maybe that time was the death knell for the village centre? As a ‘wudhus’ lad, it’s sad to see what’s left there today, but maybe that’s the way of all villages, having the life blood sucked out of them by shopping centres and online grocery deliveries???....
  38. 2 points
    A map (early 1950's) showing where the Dolphin beerhouse was (corner of Summer street and Mushroom Lane)
  39. 2 points
  40. 2 points
    The licence for the Dolphin beerhouse, Summer street changed hands in 1915 (see 2/3 of way down on the attached) Charles Brearley to Arthur Ellis.
  41. 2 points
    This is probably totally wrong, but here goes..... The item on the pole appears to be a lanyard of some sort and the dark shiny appearance would suggest that it is made of a rubberised material, or maybe a rubber coating on a rope? Trying to gauge the size of it, looking at the people nearby, when decoiled it looks like it would be maybe 6-8 feet long, with a hook (or loop) at one end and at the other end, a stiff section 18-24” long, like the handle of a whip? It appears to be only hooked on to the pole, just above head height and is meant to be taken off and used for something, then put back as it was found. You can see from the map that the position of the pole is at the interstection of where the tramlines split, one route down Wicker and the other down Blonk Street. I seem to have either read or see somewhere that the overhead lines that powered the trams were on discrete circuits and when changing route (and therefore) circuit, the tram needed to have its pantograph (the arm on the top of the tram that draws power from the overhead line) swapped from one line to another. On the top of the pantograph was a pulley wheel, with a deep recessed groove, in which the power line ran. The pantograph itself was sprung loaded, so the pantograph would always be in contact with the overhead line, as it would need a constant supply of electricity to power the motor, lights, etc. So, my theory (whacky though it might be) is that this was a device with which the tram operator used to swap lines and take a route on another circuit. They would unhook the lanyard off the pole, nip up to the top deck with it, lasso the pantograph and pull it down off the power line (hence the rubberised rope for insulation) and swing it over to the new power line, lining up the pulley wheel and relocating it to the new source. The tram would then be able to take a new route, powered by the circuit for that route........ for example, the tram would stop on Wicker, swap lines and turn down Blonk Street..... or something like that? So, I reckon it’s a pantograph puller, power line swapper, type of device...... Does that have any credibility whatsoever?
  42. 2 points
    Yes, if my memory is correct there were six in a row and you still had to queue for one at busy times in the 50's and 60's.
  43. 2 points
  44. 2 points
    A nice bit of brickwork by the bricklayer at the broad field pub.
  45. 2 points
    In direct answer to the question, NO THEY ARE NOT. The planning panel are mostly unqualified to make an individual true assesment of the plan put forward in a sensitive conservation area. They read the paperwork proposals, but unless they have actually been to the area, and investigated how a planned building will affect the 'neighbouring properties', and talked to 'local people', directly taking on board the issues they have, they truly are NOT respectful of the reason WHY it is a CONSERVATION AREA. It was made a CONSERVATION AREA for a REASON. We all know of heritage buildings and areas lost to this WONDERFUL CITY, by past planning panels shocking decisions.
  46. 2 points
    Published: May 27, 1889.
  47. 2 points
    If I remember right the ceiling was painted matt black with stars painted on to make it look as though you were outside..
  48. 2 points
    Was down at Crich last week. 510 was being moved late in the afternoon and is looking very smart.
  49. 2 points
    This is a recommendation for a book available from Amazon (£8 well spent) - an edited and updated version (with corrections and new information and pictures) of James Hayton Stainton's "Past Chapters in Sheffield History". It was originally published in 1918 for the benefit of prisoners of war. It's very good on old street layouts and especially the background to the High Street widening. There is a "Look Inside" feature on the Amazon site that allows skinflints to read some of its pages: Past Chapters in Sheffield History - Amazon Link
  50. 2 points
    There was a pub called the Rising Sun on Hunshelf Road at Stocksbridge directly across the road from the billet mill. In the billet mill large ingots were rolled at yellow heat down into blooms of say up to 4" plus square, and then cut up on a hot saw into lengths to suit the customers. In an early application of technology the blooms were measured for length and a very early computer made by Elliot Automation determined the best cuts to make out of a given length to suit the various customers. The computer use first generation germanium transistors and had a 1K magnetic core store for it's memory. The pub was obviously very (too) convenient for the parched workforce and I was told the Fox's had bought out the licence and closed and demolished the pub in 1967. My connection with this came in the early nineteen seventies when I parked my A35 van (Wallace & Gromit Mobile) on the cleared ground of the pub in order to carry out the " Redex Treatment". This consisted of running around until the engine was hot, parking up, removing the air filter; and pouring a can full of Redex engine detergent/cleaner into the top of the carb. This was supposed to clear the valve stems and piston rings and restore performance. It also produced huge quantities of black smoke. When I started this procedure I had failed to notice the large billet mill high voltage substation downwind just a few yards away. I'd also forgotten that large substations often used photo-electric ray fire detection in case of fire in the oil-filled switchgear. I'd just got about half the can of Redex in the engine and couldn't see a hand in front of my face when there was a loud bang from the substation and the loud whine from the billet mill opposite wound down to a worrying silence. The penny dropped ! I flung the air filter inside the car, shut down the bonnet and was speeding back down the hill in the opposite direction to where I knew the high voltage gang would be approaching within about ten seconds. My stealthy departure was not helped by a smoke trail that the Red Arrows would have been proud of. I think I got away with it 'so don't tell anyone. hilldweller.
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