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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 23/05/20 in Posts

  1. 2 points
    What do we know about the history of the Salvation Army Citadel building? It seems to have been neglected for years although there's talk of it finally being redeveloped and utilised again!
  2. 2 points
    Do you mean the castle like structure, that was built by the owner of a fruit and veg shop next door, I think in the 70's.
  3. 2 points
    Albert Jeffery, shopkeeper, 102 Walkley Road (Kelly's 1925). The building is still there https://goo.gl/maps/G3DA4Tzt93DC93DRA
  4. 2 points
  5. 2 points
    I’m at a loss as to why successive councils removed nearly all the monuments, obelisk etc, away from the town centre, I personally think the obelisk would enhance Fargate or the statue of Victoria that’s now languishing in Endcliffe Park. Nearly every town and city I’ve visited statues and other historical information abound, the best and most memorable city I’ve ever visited was Edinburgh, it blew me away.
  6. 2 points
    Here's a couple of pictures of ATJ 778 from the Leyland Torque magazine.
  7. 2 points
    My mother use to take me and my sisters for our Whitsun tide clothes [once a year rig-out.] Most families used Banners cheques, just another way of paying weekly. Blanchards did a similar thing This is a painting of old Banners done by my brother.
  8. 1 point
    Frog and Parrot was named by previous landlord Roger Nowill, he actually kept a parrot in the bar. He was a bit of a character and was once seen on TV with the parrot.The pub was one of the first that brewed beer onsite including the famous Roger and Out, which has been well documented. This would have been early '80s. As far as I know, some of the brewing apparatus is still onsite, but unusable due to safety reasons (I think asbestos insulation)
  9. 1 point
    William Hutchinson certainly owned a lot of property: the 1864 Sheffield Flood damaged nineteen of his houses in Green Lane and Acorn Street! He was granted over £16 in compensation - quite generous compared to the paltry amounts some received. See https://www2.shu.ac.uk/sfca/claimDetails.cfm?claim=4-3865
  10. 1 point
    Smith's cleaners on the right
  11. 1 point
    I thought our readers might be interested in these wonderful Sheffield mugs from artist Alan Pennington Here's what Alan says about the mugs on his shop website Due to popular demand, I am pleased to offer a selection of Sheffield themed mugs which bear my artwork of iconic places in Sheffield. These modern and attractive mugs look great in any kitchen, either on their own or in sets of mixed or matching colours. Give your home some extra character and stand out from your friends & neighbours with these original, eye-catching mugs! PERFECT FOR: Housewarming Gift / Wedding Gift / Reminder of Home / Birthdays / Anniversary, Buy Now & Give Later. ★ High Quality Glazed Ceramic ★ Microwave & Dishwasher Safe ★ "I ♥ Sheffield" sign-off on front If you would like to own one of these brilliant iconic Sheffield mugs here is the link to the online shop - https://www.etsy.com/uk/listing/178707658/iconic-sheffield-mugs-alan-pennington
  12. 1 point
    A walk down Attercliffe to take a look at Banners building, The Adelphi Theatre, The Travellers Inn Pub and loads more to see how the place has changed..
  13. 1 point
    I think he got some from the demolition of some properties on Cuthbert Bank if you look at the building there is very little facing stone just the rubble from inner walls on stone faced buildings, he did a good job of it eventually.
  14. 1 point
    I was brought up in a post-war council house. The kitchen had a cast iron oven range that was heated by the fire in the living room, so there was no fire in the kitchen itself. Heat was controlled by a number of levers and dampers. Does anyone know what these were called or, even better, have a picture of one? (I don't mean the Yorkshire range with the fire in the kitchen).
  15. 1 point
    I remember the fella building this and some of the stone was delivered by us he was a shop owner from next door to the pub built as a potato store as I remember. Here's a bit of history for Robert Hales I took some years ago, Robert Hales - 7 feet 6 inches (228.6 cm) Robert Hales was born to William and Anne Hales on 2 May 1820, in the village of West Somerton near Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England. He was one of 9 children. Both his mother and his father were over 6 feet tall. His 5 sisters averaged about 6 feet 3 inches and his brothers averaged 6 feet 5 inches. However, one of his sisters (Mary Hales, later to become Mary Laskey) measured 7 feet 2 inches and another sister (Anne Hales, later to become Anne Laskey) measured only a few inches shorter than her sister Mary. Robert Hales grew to a height of 7 feet 8 inches tall. His weight was said to be over 32 stone and his chest measurment was 64 inches. Robert's father William was a farmer but Robert himself became a sailor. At the age of 13 he joined the navy, but when he was 17 years old he became to big. Robert Hales started to exhibit himself at the Tombland Fair in Norwich and the Brittannia Fair in Great Yarmouth. Later he joined his sister Mary and her manager/husband Joe Laskey. After Mary Laskey died at the age of 30, Joe Laskey married the sister Anne Laskey who was about 6 feet 8 inches tall. Robert did not agree to Joe marrying his other sister and the group parted. Robert Hales went to America where he met P.T. Barnum. Barnum signed him for his American Museum and Robert was exhibited in New York and was known as the Norfolk Giant. While with Barnum, he met and 'married' the giantess Eliza Simpson. He toured with Barnum for 2 years before he went back to England, tired of touring. He became the landlord of the Craven Head Tavern in Drury Lane in London. Robert Hales died in 1863 in Great Yarmouth and was burried in West Somerton.
  16. 1 point
    The 1855 Ordnance Survey map shows several wells in the area. https://maps.nls.uk/view/102345217?fbclid=IwAR3z8gxnQgm4tNDpfVEwxYqIOn0TofTuLSKgG1rvoAuc3GLeu4Vx3AmWj_c#zoom=6&lat=7681&lon=10406&layers=BT
  17. 1 point
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  19. 1 point
    I've had the pleasure of bumping into Patrick in town a couple of times and pleased to say that he stopped and chatted for considerable time on each occasion. Top man.
  20. 1 point
  21. 1 point
    There was previously a better pub a bit further down Pond Hill, the Lyceum, pictured on this thread by RLongden
  22. 1 point
    The building behind the old Post Office at 5:26 was part of the old GPO buildings in the days when GPO did telephones as well as mail. In here somewhere was the old telex exchange. Also there was a main distribution frame with private circuits from around the city centre
  23. 1 point
  24. 1 point
    The factory on the left under construction is Richards Bros cutlery works on Moore Street Looking the other way in 1949, with the bottom of The Moor on the left and the S & E Co-op in the background. https://britainfromabove.org.uk/en/image/EAW025215
  25. 1 point
    He hs returned, and of course he couldn't find the sort of ticket I really wanted.Having his collection sorted by originating station and not ticket type means finding one was tricky. Nevertheless, he did find a few to illustrate my point. A perambulator & childs mail cart ticket ifrom British Rail! An older, Southern Railway issued ticket which has bicycle as well as prams etc. not very easy to read, but then back in those days it was common to put a lot of test on each small ticket. And a North Eastern Railway bicycle ticket
  26. 1 point
    From the Leyland Torque Magazine ----- Driving a Titan Torque Converter "Gearless Bus" in 1948 The bus in question is to operate Sheffield route 3, OUTER CIRCLE, a short working from Malin Bridge to Bellhouse Road. After entering the cab and taking his seat the, driver on glancing around would notice that although the hand controls, a change speed lever to his left, and the hand brake to his right, were normal, the foot controls were not! On the right of the steering column was the accelerator pedal and the brake pedal was in the center. On the left, where one would expect a clutch pedal or preselective gear engaging pedal, but there was simply a foot rest. A knowledgeable driver would now be aware that he was in control of a “GEARLESS BUS”. We shall assume that the vehicle is GWE 730, Titan TD5c with a Cravens body, new in 1940, and number 431 in the “A” fleet. The time is 4.10pm towards the end of June. It is a warm day and we have a fair loading of passengers. The driver checks for intermediate position (neutral) by means of the left-hand lever, presses the starter button on the dash in front of him and the engines comes into life. There are two bells from the conductor, the control lever is pushed forward and a slight clunk comes from the toggle-clutch as the torque converter is engaged. The handbrake (push on type) is released and pulled back, a “tickety –tick” sound from the free-wheel is noticeable. On accelerating, this ceases and the bus moves forward very smoothly and turns right into Holme Lane. The engine is revving at its maximum governed speed, the road speed increasing until at about 20 mph the change speed lever is pulled back into direct drive. Approaching the stop before Middlewood Road, the brakes are applied and a few yards before we come to a halt, the lever is pushed forward to engage the converter. The free-wheel sound is again heard and the bus coasts to a halt, with a final application of the foot brake. Starting off once more, a left turn is made into Middlewood Road where the slight gradient necessitates the constant use of the converter. The engine is again running at the governed speed, and there is a constant, steady drone from the induction system. The gradient levels out alongside Hillsborough Park and the lever is pulled back into direct drive. With a slight clunk, the drone is replaced by the mellow roar of the 8.6 oil engine, similar to a standard TD5. Turning right we traverse Leppings Lane, passing the Sheffield Wednesday Football Ground in the process. On leaving the Leppings Lane /Herries Road stop, the usual procedure is followed and on reaching the Five Arches Railway viaduct, an angler from the adjacent pond is picked up. Given the starting bell, the driver fully depresses the accelerator, the engine reaches its governed speed, and simultaneously the hand brake is released. Slowly, the bus moves forward up the hill, though the engine is racing, progress at best is “steady”. We pass Scraith Wood to stop at a point near Penrith Road and at this stage there is a wisp of steam from the radiator cap. It is a warm day and we have a”boil” on. Laboriously starting off again, we reach the summit at Moonshine Lane and on stopping to set down, steam blows furiously from the radiator cap. Allowing a couple of minutes to cool down, the water is replenished from an obliging shopkeeper nearby. We were lucky that the fluid in the converter did not “gasify”, or there would have been a loss of drive. Continuing down Herries Drive, with direct engagement, the steep pull up Longley Lane necessitates a forward movement of the lever to engage the torque converter to climb to the stop opposite the Firth Park Grammar School. The change is achieved by leaving the right foot flat down on the accelerator and pushing the control lever forwards, the engine again attaining its governed speed, stopping near the school. There is one more slow climb to Sheffield Lane Top and here we turn right into Hatfield House Lane, travelling on this level throroughfare to the terminus at Bellhouse Road, breathless, after an almost four mile journey, ready to return to Malin Bridge on route 2. Passengers all off, the bus turns right into Bellhouse Road, prior to reversing into Shiregreen Lane opposite the Concord Park gates. Neutral is selected, and then an attempt to engage reverse is frustrated by a grinding noise from the selector dogs. Stubbornly, reverse gear cannot be engaged, but our driver has experienced this problem before. The trick here is to stop the engine and re-engage reverse ratio – usually this was successful. If not the process was repeated until reverse was selected! Drawing up to the stopping place, the engine was stopped, to wait departure time to return to Malin Bridge. This adventure was a fairly typical journey on a “GEARLESS BUS”, a mix of flat and hilly terrain, having one long ascent and one moderate descent down Longley Lane. The latter feature would remind the driver that there was very little engine braking effect on this type of bus and with much reliance on the brakes.
  27. 1 point
  28. 1 point
    While walking along Myers Lane near Worrall I noticed what looks like a marker stone on the north side of the road at 53.24.56 North x 1.33.10 West, it appears to have ODC 1868 No1 engraved on it. Although I'm from Worrall originally and must have walked past it many times this is the first time I've noticed it. Can anyone tell me what it is for? Also, on all the old maps there is a building called Larch Hall close to this marker. As a child I always knew the area as Larch Hall but there was nothing to see even back then [1960's]. Can anyone tell me anything about Larch Hall? Pete
  29. 1 point
    Sheffield had a few one offs, here are three, there must have been more. The first one is a one off colour scheme on a Regent 1, ex show bus that was full fronted but converted to half cab, sensibly, when it came to Sheffield. The second was fleet number 54, AEC Regal, the only half canopy body for Sheffield. The third was, I think the only Sheffield Transport Bedford, not in my opinion a good advert for Cravens.
  30. 1 point
    Nothing of note to add, but a fascinating (to me) series of maps from old-maps.co.uk, showing the encroachment of the gannister mine (presumably a quarry) 1893 not too close 1904 getting very close 1923 all the way around 1934 no Larch Hall And an overlay from NLS: https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=17&lat=53.41529&lon=-1.54781&layers=168&b=4
  31. 1 point
    Thanks for the pictures, I definitely rode on this bus a number of times in Sheffield during its years in service. The conductor could change the route number and destination blinds from the upper deck whilst the bus was being driven, e.g. 98 Southey Green to 61 Nether Edge, which added to the interest for a young enthusiast
  32. 1 point
    Oughtibridge Railway Station or as you can see in these photographs Oughty Bridge Train station!
  33. 1 point
    Not looking a lot different (in terms of land use) in 1890ish From old-maps.co.uk
  34. 1 point
    White's 1879 66 Malinda Street - Tomlinson Jph. jun. cab proprietor White's 1901 66 Malinda Street - Batty Samuel, cowkeeper. By 1905 Mr Batty was listed as a carting contractor at the same address.
  35. 1 point
    Whilst looking for something else, I happened upon this from Picture Sheffield:
  36. 1 point
    Found this that shows George retired from the business in September 1902.
  37. 1 point
  38. 1 point
    I think that N F M C & P is an abbreviation for "Not for Mail Carts and Perambulators", probably because those items usually had a specific pre-printed ticket at a different rate to the rather general "article". Other specific tickets were for bicycles & dogs. Mail carts appear to have been a type of three-wheeled perambulator popular in the late 18th & early 20th century. I have no idea what the C R Rate means. I have sent my husband (who is a member of the Transport Ticket Society) to see if he can find anything similar in his collection. He could be gone some time .
  39. 1 point
    The proprietor was George Reuben Barron, b 1854, Scotton Lincolnshire. In the late 1870's his business premises were at 27 Penistone Road. In the 1881 census he was single, boarding at 57 Cross Bedford Street. By 1891 he was living at 7 Jobson Rd, with his nephew Reuben Welch, a harness maker. The earliest I can find him trading as Roscoe's in the newspaper's is a reference to them exhibiting in the Ecclesfield Agricultural Show in 1889. In August of the same year they relocated to Infirmary Road from their previous premises on Penistone Road. He married in 1898, and in 1901 had accommodation on his business premises at No 1 Infirmary Road. In July of 1902, everything went up for auction. By September 1905, Tomlinson's were advertising at Roscoes Carriage and Motor Works. Tomlinson's tenure seems to be fairly brief, the property had been advertised in May 1905. It doesn't appear that George was a failure...this article from 1929 suggests he was very much a success.
  40. 1 point
    Another demonstrator was ATJ 778, fleet number 299 a Leyland TD4c which was in service from 1936 until 1949 and may have been instrumental in the post war decision to invest in PD2's as in subsequent years many more Leylands were purchased. The war years had seen 'Utility' vehicles being acquired from whoever could supply, which included other undertakings, resulting in a very varied fleet and hiring in from others at times of difficulty. It was an interesting period before motor cars started their inexorable intrusion into our lives and affected public transport to its detriment. Compared with fleets of Routemasters and RT's Sheffield probably had more "Oddities" than any other bus fleet in the country! It certainly had a very popular coloured livery as the 1952 experimental Green soon dicovered
  41. 1 point
    Dixons used to sell an own brand version of the Zenith B which had a Prinzflex sticker over the Zenith name. Dixons used to take several pages each week in the Amateur Photographer magazine.
  42. 1 point
    Hi. That's for the wonderful picture. One forgets what a Zenith looks like! He's a picture of a Zenith E. The light meter is apparent at the top in the middle. Cheers, Wazzie Worrall.
  43. 1 point
  44. 1 point
    Robert had a son called General age 12 in 1861 at the Burgoyne Arms.
  45. 1 point
    Quote: "Tracing the beginnings of the ‘fever’ leads us back a month earlier, when a Bicycle Club was hastily founded at Sharrow (near Wilson's Snuff factory), launched at a crowded Pomona Hotel, with hundreds gathered outside to see a velocipede contest, when the bicycle made by local firm Beck and Candlish of Brown Street was generally agreed superior to one imported from Pickering's of New York." Sharrow Cycling Club Football Team https://www.picturesheffield.com/s00129
  46. 1 point
  47. 1 point
    This is just a silly name made up by some marketing idiot, I always call it by it’s proper name the Prince of Wales, all old pubs had names that meant an event or a person etc. It’s on Devonshire Street by the way not West Street.
  48. 1 point
    Photo looking down the Wicker through the Wicker Arches railway bridge Great photo - not seen this one before
  49. 1 point
    I recognise the brick work and Boys Girls immediately, but can't remember where this was. I remember the 'Manual', which was for 3rd and 4th years to re-enter the building when a break was complete. (whistle blew) Mr Wilson was certainly still alive about 18months to 2 years ago, because I met someone who knew him Miss Carter was there at same time but never taught me, and can't remember what she looked like. Miss Holmes, I think had long black hair, but never taught me. The last 3 all taught me at some time.
  50. 1 point
    As promised here is a picture of the front of the Station Hotel on the Silver Jubilee day 1977 enjoy and can you see yourself
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