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  1. 5 points
    Hi all, so glad I found this site, so much history in one place. I was born at walkley in 65, moved to Bubwith rd Brightside where my mum was born and grandparents lived. From there we lived in a cottage in Roe Woods, my dad became one of the first 6 park patrollers, on motorbikes, in Sheffield while at Roe Wood. From there we moved to Shiregreen where mum still lives. Dad was born at the bottom end of Bellhouse rd. Have lived in a few places in Sheffield and now 20 years in Chesterfield. Looking forward to reading lots more and to dig up some of my own memories and photos to share with everyone. :-))
  2. 4 points
    Last year's thread and I rediscovered this 35mm slide which seems to fit appropriately into this one.Taken in June 1963 when rear loaders were favourite and steam locos much in evidence at Midland Station.
  3. 3 points
    Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12
  4. 3 points
    For your information the letters on the bridge BB & JH refer to Benjamin Blonk and John Huntsman. Blonk Street was so called because when it was made the "tilt" shown on the map on the river side of Blonk St.was "The Wicker ***" belonging to the Blonk Family. On the other side of Blonk St. was "The Wicker Wheel" also belonging to the Blonk Family. You will also see a third grinding shop belonging to the Blonks at the end of the dam to the right of "Blonk Island". Later on John Huntsman had a Huntsman Melting Furnace at the end of the Wicker Tilt building. If you look through the large window nearest to Blonk Bridge you will see the chimney of the Huntsman furnace preserved as a monument. Remember the old Sheffield saying "Down T'Wicker were t'water goes o'er t'weir" the weir on the upstream side of Ladys Bridge diverted water to the Wicker Tilt and Wicker Wheel. I learnt all about this by carrying out research for descendants of this branch of the Blonk family who live in Australia. My Blonk family come from a later branch of the Blonk family
  5. 3 points
    I've read somewhere that the flats that face Lady's bridge and Nursery Street were originally called Castle House, the windows just above the river was where the dogs were kept when it was a Dogs Home when it re-located there from the Pond Street area in c1900 I think , it wasn't used for long as it was always damp because of the river often flooding the place. The ornamental front door was the entrance and you can still make out the name. At the end of the walk on Blonk Street bridge you can see the initials of one of the men who ran the stables there plus possibly the vets initials too, the chap that owned and ran the stables also had stabling and shoeing available at 30-36 Burton Road now known as the Yellow Arch Recording Studios but the Horseshoe above the arch tells just what it was .
  6. 2 points
    Eva Darwent, daughter of Francis Inman and Florence Darwent was born on 22nd July 1903 and baptised at Carbrook. Her grandfather Frank was an experienced publican (Hare and Hounds Bradfield 1871, Sportsman's Inn, Stannington in 1873, Commercial Hotel, Tinsley 1895) and died in 1895 at the Commercial Hotel, but was buried in Stannington. His son, also Francis Inman Darwent (born 1873 died 1940) went on to run the Commercial Hotel and was Eva's father. F.I. Darwent number 3 was born in 1895 but died the following year, F.I.Darwent number 4 was born in 1911 and died in 1951) George Salt son of William and Mary Jane Salt was born on 3rd October 1900. His father William was licensee of the Pheasant from 1908 to 1922 They married on 30th July 1923 In 1939 Eva was running a sweetshop at 661 Attercliffe Common Eva died on 14th February 1969 at her shop at 661 Attercliffe Common, not far from the junction with Weedon Street. Possibly this was the shop from where she sold drinks?
  7. 2 points
    As recently promised I have extracted the information relevant to Sheffield City Police contained in copies of some early Police Almanacs that I recently had passed to me. The early editions of the Almanac gave very little information in relation to the city and borough forces in a lot of cases, and sadly Sheffield was no exception in this respect. Where there was no change in the information from the previous year I have not repeated it. Note that until 1869, the chief officer was known as the Head Constable, a common feature of early borough/city police forces at that period. 1858: Force strength was 132 to serve a population of 135,310. 1859: The Head Constable was Thomas Raynor, up to January 1859 when John Jackson took up the post. The force strength had increased to 191. 1862: Head Constable - John Jackson. Population - 185,157. Force strengh - 191. 1863: Force strength - 215 1864: Force strength - 230 1865: Force strength - 240 1866: Force strength - 245 1867: Head Constable - John Jackson. Chief Clerk - M.T. England. Force strength - 250 1868: Force strength - 260 1869: Chief Constable - John Jackson. Chief Clerk - J. England. Inspectors - J. Rodgers; J. Wilson; F. Otter. Force strength - 280 1901: Population - 324,243 Force strength - 465. Chief Constable - Commander Charles T. Scott. Deputy Chief Constable - George Mackley, Esq. Town Clerk - Henry Sayer, Esq. Magistrates Clerk - C.E. Vickers, Esq. Inspector Weights & Measures - G.W. Catchpole. Coroner - D. Wightman, Esq. Warrant Officer - Superintendent J. Gilley. Chief Clerk - Superintendent G.H. Barker. Fire Brigade - Superintendent W. Frost. Superintendent Detective Department - J.M. Moody. Central Division - Inspector M. Bridgeman. Attercliffe Division - Inspector G. Moore. Brightside Division - Detective Inspector W. Smith. Broomhill Division - Detective Inspector C. Thompson. Ecceshall Division - Detective Inspector W. Jackson. Walkley Division - Detective Inspector J. Goodwin The first Head Constable, Thomas Raynor was appointed in 1844, on the formation of the Sheffield Borough Police, as it was known as at that time. John Jackson, appointed as Head Constable on 1st January 1859, was to serve until 1898. Commander Charles T. Scott was appointed as Chief Constable in December 1898, and served in this role until 1912.
  8. 2 points
    This morning I went under Bramall Lane Bridge and investigated further. The far end of the bridge's route (now under the Decathlon car park) is 100 metres from the Staples car park end already shown on this thread (the measurements are marked along the way to aid workmen). I post pictures of the other end of the bridge and an outflow inside the culvert that I think was originally from the Vulcan works dam and water power site. Although I'm happy to be wrong again
  9. 2 points
    Hi Syrup Thank you for the news article clipping. It's very tantalising close apart from one minor detail the name in the article states G Lyon not J Lyon. However, the date and stables are spot on which leads me to believe Joseph Lyon worked at Sheffield Tramway Company. Joseph (27) married Emma(22) in 1869, the two witnesses are George (53) & Ann Lyon (55). His father is named Thomas so judging by the age gap George is probably Joseph's uncle. They come from a farming background in Lincolnshire so working together with horses makes sense. In 1883 George would have been aged 67 hence the article (oldest servant) makes it more probable that it was presented to George rather than Joseph, who was only 41 at that time. Joseph died (unknown) not long after aged just 44 and was buried at Heeley Christ Church on 2nd Jan 1887. So another connection to the article (he is now going to Heeley). I can only assume that the inscriber perhaps made an unlikely error with the initial on the trophy? I can't find a record of George & Ann having children hence the trophy must have been passed down to one of Joseph's two sons. I did find a very interesting post on this site on the STC and will make contact to see if any employee records still survive and hopefully will provide the proof that George & Joseph did work together. https://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/topic/154-sheffield-trams/ Again thanks for the clipping. John O.
  10. 2 points
    If my memory serves me well, it doesn't usually, I seem to remember that it was used as a stand for milk churns awaiting collection. I may possibly remember a fellow miscreant trying to get one of the lids off to quench a thirst but if pressed I would plead the UK version of the fifth amendment
  11. 2 points
    It really frustrates me that not enough is known about Sheffield Castle. We don't really seem to have any information at all on this place considering what an important Sheffield structure it was. Sheffield Castle is still an enigma. Why is that?
  12. 2 points
    modern 'journalism' at its finest. Hide behind youtube and stir some s***. It brought the city together, made us very proud to be sheffielders and remembered the lads who paid the ultimate sacrifice. who plants the bedding plants and sweeps up from time to time is of little or no consequence. I dont see what youre trying to achieve by posting it to be honest.
  13. 2 points
    Anyone living in any of these houses may be interested in this postcard on Ebay. ------------------- https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/173604248815?ul_noapp=true Google Street View -------https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.3837307,-1.4973794,3a,75y,81.23h,90.51t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s24w0G3NbxJMMlYOd7eyZgw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656?hl=en
  14. 2 points
    Probably of no interest to anyone else, but one of the photos here shows the location of my Dad’s bench, sited and dedicated to his memory for almost twenty years now...
  15. 2 points
  16. 2 points
    Was down at Crich last week. 510 was being moved late in the afternoon and is looking very smart.
  17. 2 points
    This is a recommendation for a book available from Amazon (£8 well spent) - an edited and updated version (with corrections and new information and pictures) of James Hayton Stainton's "Past Chapters in Sheffield History". It was originally published in 1918 for the benefit of prisoners of war. It's very good on old street layouts and especially the background to the High Street widening. There is a "Look Inside" feature on the Amazon site that allows skinflints to read some of its pages: Past Chapters in Sheffield History - Amazon Link
  18. 2 points
    There was a pub called the Rising Sun on Hunshelf Road at Stocksbridge directly across the road from the billet mill. In the billet mill large ingots were rolled at yellow heat down into blooms of say up to 4" plus square, and then cut up on a hot saw into lengths to suit the customers. In an early application of technology the blooms were measured for length and a very early computer made by Elliot Automation determined the best cuts to make out of a given length to suit the various customers. The computer use first generation germanium transistors and had a 1K magnetic core store for it's memory. The pub was obviously very (too) convenient for the parched workforce and I was told the Fox's had bought out the licence and closed and demolished the pub in 1967. My connection with this came in the early nineteen seventies when I parked my A35 van (Wallace & Gromit Mobile) on the cleared ground of the pub in order to carry out the " Redex Treatment". This consisted of running around until the engine was hot, parking up, removing the air filter; and pouring a can full of Redex engine detergent/cleaner into the top of the carb. This was supposed to clear the valve stems and piston rings and restore performance. It also produced huge quantities of black smoke. When I started this procedure I had failed to notice the large billet mill high voltage substation downwind just a few yards away. I'd also forgotten that large substations often used photo-electric ray fire detection in case of fire in the oil-filled switchgear. I'd just got about half the can of Redex in the engine and couldn't see a hand in front of my face when there was a loud bang from the substation and the loud whine from the billet mill opposite wound down to a worrying silence. The penny dropped ! I flung the air filter inside the car, shut down the bonnet and was speeding back down the hill in the opposite direction to where I knew the high voltage gang would be approaching within about ten seconds. My stealthy departure was not helped by a smoke trail that the Red Arrows would have been proud of. I think I got away with it 'so don't tell anyone. hilldweller.
  19. 2 points
  20. 2 points
    The demolition of Sheffield in the 1960's, 1970's & 1980's a blaze was the sky with fires from the demolition sites there were only a few known Sheffield Companies at the time A.D.H Demolition Limited (contracted to Sheffield Council) A. Whites Demoliiton Ltd Childs Demolition Ltd Demex Ltd J. Whites Ltd and later T.D.E (Rotherham) (ancestors of A. Whites demolition) i remember as an only child going with my parents to the demolition sites, i remember the black sooty days crooks moor was ablaze with fires and being situated on a hill you could look across Sheffield and see other contractors lighting the sky. The forgotten demolition men and woman contractors that made Adolf Hitler assault on sheffield oblivious. The Sheffield Council pillaged property with compulsory purchase took peoples homes and business for pittance of monies, i remember sometimes wed pull houses down leaving the odd one still standing whilst the owners or tenants were fighting for their legal rights to stay or be given a better deal. Sheffield Council insisted on the demolition of what we would see today as historical buildings but to the council they was drab, nuisance and needed to be pulled down our sheffield architecture of centuries past were stone masons are not of what is today ended up a pile of rubble and down the tip it went. Odd pieces will have survived and relocated without knowing and the next generation losing site. I know the red set that lay on the floor in kelham island were taken from the Sheffield Abattoir and re laid in the museum yet a piece of history is lost again and no mention of where they arrived from they just part of the decor of the museum yet in truth is part of a bigger history. i attach a stone fireplace my parents built in a property still in the sheffield area, the new owners of that property will never know the history of that house or where that huge fireplace with its ornate archway came from. The archway formed the door way to the GAS HOUSE on commercial Street its were you paid your account (its historic significance to Sheffield is when sheffield turned from Candle Light to Gas. i attach another photo of a font that was part of the St josephs convent, common side htpp://www.yorkshirefilmarchive.com/film/environmental-health-part-park-hill-slums-1-5 I'm hoping a log can be made on this site for anyone to upload demolition photographs and maybe if theres any demolition men left that worked on these site can contribute before history is lost. I was a fortunate person i know much of sheffield i lived the era and a breathed it with my family. Im trying to see if we can make a single page where all the data of the lost (demolished) can be found, before it is too late. I want to see what the public holds before i update this site again with All the 1000 pictures and documents i hold of Sheffield
  21. 2 points
    171 on corner of Alfred Street and Dane Street https://www.old-maps.co.uk/#/Map/437500/389500/13/101329
  22. 2 points
    I remember as a child in the '70s being so proud of that fountain because my Dad had told me that it had been made (partially at least) at Bramahs, which he worked at as a fabricator for some years Cant honestly remember if Dad had actually had anything to do with its construction, but in my head 'My Dad made that!', and I told anyone that would listen !
  23. 2 points
    Picture Sheffield gives date as 22 July 1961 ( spot on boginspro!) which was a Saturday. The AEC Regent III - VWJ 541 was one of nine Roe bodied vehicles out of 85 AEC's delivered in 1956/57 for tram replacement services, seen here on Route 24 to Tinsley. Used to love the smell of Ground coffee which drifted out of Davy's.
  24. 2 points
    A stunning bit of film. Anyone seen this before?http://www.yorkshirefilmarchive.com/film/environmental-health-part-park-hill-slums-1-5
  25. 2 points
    Not sure if we already have a drinking fountain thread, but this image posted by Aiden Stones on his Twitter account is fantastic. It shows the drinking fountain that was at the junction of Gibraltar St, Allen St and Bowling Green Street, and todays view from Moorfileds facing towards Penistone Rd.. https://twitter.com/OldSheffield
  26. 2 points
    One of my husband's hobbies is collecting transport tickets, and occasionally in the bits of paper he buys something interesting turns up, such as this one. It is a ticket for the City Clopper, a horse bus which operated in the city in the early 1980s: I remember reading about the horse bus but I wasn't living in Sheffield at the time and I don't think I ever saw it operating. A short film about the service:
  27. 2 points
  28. 2 points
    If you follow the supertram which is blurred above to the road, is where the church would have been. Possibly where the big tree is now. Also I note that Midland Station has now lost it's first foot bridge.
  29. 2 points
    Hi Folks, I wrote a new blog about seeing I'm So Hollow at Romeo's & Juliet's in February 1981. Link - http://www.mylifeinthemoshofghosts.com/2017/08/26/im-so-hollow-atmosphere-at-romeos-juliets-bank-street-sheffield-wednesday-11th-february-1981/ Enjoy. Dodger
  30. 1 point
    The 1904 Licensing Act introduced a scheme whereby Licensing Magistrates could now refuse to renew a pub’s licence if it was considered that the pub was unnecessary to provide for the needs of the public. Compensation would be paid both to the owner of the premises and the licensee although, typically, only about 10% of the compensation went to the licensee. This compensation was paid for by a levy on the licences granted to other premises. This provision of the 1904 Act was carried forward into the Licensing (Consolidation) Act of 1910. The first operation of this new scheme was on 8th May 1905 at the first meeting of the Licensing Compensation Authority, which consisted of the City Justices including the Licensing Committee. All the following 18 houses had their licences refused. This gives an indication of their closure date and final landlord. Bailey Hotel, Bailey Street, licensee Harriet Guest, owner Strouts Brewery Co Ltd Black Horse (beer-on licence), Edward Street, licensee John Hudson, owner Old Albion Brewery Co Ltd Britannia Tavern, Portobello Street, licensee John Shaw, Owner S.H.Ward and Co Ltd, in existence since 1825 Corner Pin, Allen Street, licensee Titus Marsden, owner A.H. Smith and Co. Ltd Crooked Billet, Scotland Street, licensee George Henry Malkin for last 13 years, owner Thos Rawson and Co Ltd (tenant provided 50 dinners a day at 4½d each) Cross Daggers, West Bar Green ,licensee Alfred Elliott for last 18 years, owner Thos Rawson and Co Ltd Filesmiths’ Arms, Scotland Street, licensee Peter Scanlon, owner James Haynes, Crown Brewery Nelson Hotel (beer-on licence), Solly Street, licensee John Fleming, owner Duncan Gilmour and Co Ltd New Britannia, Portobello Street, licensee William Fletcher, owner Brampton Brewery Co Ltd Oak Tree (free house), Broad Lane, licensee John Miles Fawcett, owner James Newton, Birkendale Old Turk’s Head, Scotland Street Orange Branch (off- licence), Hollis Croft, licensee Mary Ann Watson, owner Thos Rawson and Co Ltd Pheasant, Bailey Lane, licensee William Kirk, owner Chambers and Co Ltd Shamrock Inn, Solly Street, licensee Patrick Cusack, owner John Smith’s Tadcaster Brewery Co Ltd Star, Orange Street, licensee Henry Carter, owner John Smith’s Tadcaster Brewery Co Ltd Wheat Sheaf, Bailey Lane, owner Henry Tomlinson Ltd White Lion, Bailey Street, owner Henry Tomlinson Ltd (No sign beer-on licence), 69 Scotland Street, licensee Albert Crow, owner Charles Lawton
  31. 1 point
    Hello is I was trawling through Ebay’s scissors looking for a scissorsmith when I saw the scissors shown below. I was intrigued and I had to have a bid, all be it, ultimately unsuccessfully. I felt I must post a photo, as these grape scissors are certainly “Sheffield”. These mixed metal scissors are easy to date using the date letter associated with the hallmark on the silver finger holes. The unembellished letter “o” without a Monarch’s head, together with the crown (for Sheffield) indicates the assay at the Sheffield Assay Office in 1931. The maker of the silver part of the scissors is indicated by the “S.H.&Co.” but I will reference that later. We can see from the rear pivot area of the scissors that the blades are made of Sheffield England stainless steel and from the pivot front we a clear pictorial probable trademark with lettering below it. The “nest” with eggs in was the trademark of Sheffield’s Southern & Richardson and I think you will be able to “fill in the spaces” to confirm that makers name. These cutlery makers were known at the “Don Cutlery Works” from the middle of the 19th century and there are several images of knives spread around the forum. One of these did suggest the trademark was a “thistle” or has this been a mis-interpretation of the image on a much older and tarnished knife compared to these 20th century scissors. From a reference I think I read on line, technically, the grape scissors may not have been made by “Southern & Richardson” as in the 1920s that named company had been incorporated into a larger Sheffield concern and the latter continued with the trademarks. Hopefully the “forum” can clear this up. Returning to the “S.H.&Co.” maker’s mark now. The website www.silvermakersmarks.co.uk that I always confidently use for identifying British silversmiths, identifies the silver finger parts as having been made “probably, by Sydney Hall & Co”, and gives them an address of “Birmingham”. If there is other information regarding the maker please enlighten us, as there will be would be many interested to know. I hope there are others on the forum, like me, who like and wish they owned the grape scissors. Kalfred
  32. 1 point
    Fulwood Termius, Canterbury Ave 501 looks brand new in this shot so I’m guessing that means it was taken in the late 40’s.
  33. 1 point
    We found these photos in my grandmothers old photos whilst researching the family tree. The first one is 1920-1 the others are earlier . We have no idea which football team it is (they seem very well dressed for a pub team in those days) or who the people in the photo are. Any help would be very much appreciated Thank you Tania
  34. 1 point
    There was a belief that the Beech Nut chewing gum machines gave a free packet every 5 goes - I never scientifically evaluated this claim due to lack of funds....
  35. 1 point
    Failure to restore animation at Morecambe. If the title sounds like something from the likes of Pixar or Aardman Animations, the truth is far from amusing. It refers to a tragedy which took place 150 years ago at Morecambe. It was a reference to a futile attempt to escape from a sandbank at Morecambe which alerted me to this tale. There is, in the Zion Churchyard at Attercliffe, a memorial to Frank Giles and his brother- in-law William Coldwell who both drowned on August 17th 1868. Having researched this via contemporary newspapers, I can tell the story in greater detail. We begin in Attercliffe, at the Giles home on Shortridge Street (by the side of the John Banner building). John Giles, the head of the family worked as a foreman at the nearby Sheffield Smelting Works. Also employed there were his son Frank, aged 17 and his son-in-law William Coldwell. William had only been part of the family for just over a year, having married Ellen Austin Giles the previous year. According to one source, William at 26 was a clerk in the factory and Frank was a Trade Mark Maker. Frank had a brother, Henry, and on Saturday 15 th August 1868 the three set off from Attercliffe to travel to Morecambe on the Lancashire coast, arriving in the evening. Here they met up with 40 year old Richard Wilkinson, a dyer’s labourer from Tumbling Hill Street, Bradford who was there with his brother in law Isaac Ackroyd, a blacksmith, and Wilkinson’s two nephews, John William White and John Henry Ackroyd. According to what Isaac Ackroyd told Lawrence Holden Esq., the Coroner, on the Monday evening, they had left their lodgings at around half past five, and had made their way to a sandbank known locally as Skeer Bank or Old Scar Bank where they undressed and began to bathe. (Skeer is a local dialect word, derived from old Norse meaning a ridge of rocks, a bed of rough gravel or stones or a spit of sand.) The sandbank was easily reached at low tide, but is surrounded by channels. Their danger was spotted by a shooting party who fired their guns in an attempt to warn the bathers but to no avail. Around seven o’clock they noticed the tide was rushing in and surrounding them with water. They returned to the bank and began to dress. They tried to reach the shore but the combination of the fast incoming tide and the channel they attempted to cross proved too much. White, Frank Giles and Coldwell immediately disappeared under the water. Wilkinson tried to reach the shore, but it proved too much for him. Although he was in an exhausted condition and insensible state when he was dragged ashore and taken to the Queen’s Hotel, where attempts were made to revive him, in the words of the report, “means were adopted to restore animation”, but without success and he died half an hour later. Of the seven, it was only Isaac Ackroyd who had been able to swim. A local boatmen, by the name of William Woodhouse made a gallant effort to reach the party in the water and rescued Henry Giles and the Ackroyds. All this was witnessed by the people on the pier who were powerless to act. The body of Coldwell was recovered close to the rescued, but the body of Frank Giles was found in the afternoon closer to Heysham. The inquest, which took place before Lawrence Holden, Coroner, on the Monday evening in the Queen’s Hotel, complimented Woodhouse for his speed at attempting a rescue. The inquest was told that the bodies had all been recovered on the Monday afternoon a little distance from where they had gone down. The bodies had been nibbled by crabs and the faces were scarcely recognisable. One’s eyes had gone and another had his nose eaten away. The bodies were identified by relatives. The local boatman, William Woodhouse told the inquest that his attention was drawn to a party of bathers on the Old Skeer Bank, but he believed this to be a mistake. Again he was told about them, in the words of the person who had alerted him, “I’m sure they must be bathers, as I have seen one naked go into the water.”. Woodhouse responded with an “Oh dear, they’ll all be drowned!”. He ran down to the beach and obtaining a boat from a pleasure party, proceeded as quickly as possible to the aid of the unfortunate bathers. At this time the bank was not covered, but there was about ten feet of water in the channel. When he arrived, the bathers were all struggling in the water. He was successful in picking up four people but one, presumably Wilkinson, “never moved again”. Three had disappeared and were not seen alive again. Woodhouse believed the party would have been saved had they all stayed on the sandbank. At this time there was only two feet of water covering it. One of the jurymen stated to the Coroner that Woodhouse had been instrumental in saving these lives. The Coroner, for his part, said that he was minded to forward an account to the Royal Humane Society as he believed Woodhouse to have been a suitable candidate to receive the society’s medal. The jury returned a verdict of accidental death. The paper reported that Mrs Coldwell was in a most distressed condition and that Mr Giles who had endeavoured to save his brother was also in a very weak and dejected state. Following the inquest, the bodies of the deceased were released and those returning to Sheffield were taken on the Midland train where they were met by an undertaker. It is highly probable that just over a year after conducting the marriage ceremony of William and Ellen, John Calvert was called on to conduct his funeral. On August 30th in the morning service, the preacher’s text was Ephesians Chapter 5 verse 17: Understanding the will of the Lord. That evening an eloquent and impressive discourse was delivered from the words, “When Thy judgements are in the earth then will the nations learn righteousness. ' (Isaiah ...) They were not the only deaths on the sands of Morecambe Bay that year, A matter of a few weeks later saw two more deaths and in the years since then, more have died. Today the RNLI have a hovercraft to save lives here. This September, the Zion Churchyard is one of the locations for the popular Heritage Open Day scheme.
  36. 1 point
    It's a pretty good comparison. It's also nice to think that Robin was a Yorkshire lad.
  37. 1 point
    Sheffield Daily Telegraph 14 Jan 1872 ('Retford St' = Radford Street, I think)
  38. 1 point
    http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s26186&pos=102&action=zoom&id=28613 Very similar view. I think it is top of Newhall Rd and the Attercliffe swimming baths would have been across the road from it. As you say more Attercliffe Road/Newhall Road. And this one a bit further round the corner onto Newhall Rd - http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;t07203&pos=110&action=zoom&id=95886
  39. 1 point
    I am thinking that number 171 may have been between Dane Street and Windmill Street but can't find a picture of that section, surely there must be one somewhere. --------- This map (c) NLS -------- http://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=19&lat=53.4023&lon=-1.4313&layers=168&b=1
  40. 1 point
    When I'm doing my articles, I look through Sheffield Directories from 1780 to 1911 not consecutive I might add, but you see place and street names spelt different, Broomhill, was Broom Hill, Ringinglow was Ringinglowe, there's plenty more but not having the directories at had these two are just an example. It really annoys me when names that have been used for years are altered for no good reason.
  41. 1 point
    Did anyone go to the York Viking festival last week? It is a must for anyone who loves the history of the vikings. It is such a fun week with Viking living history camps, a Viking procession, Viking markets and Viking battles. It is always in the February half term and lasts a whole week! It is amazing, Vikings are walking around the streets and you can have your photographs taken with them and see them going about their business. The battles are so realistic, you all need to go next year, believe me you will not be disappointed. Here are some photographs I took when there, enjoy.
  42. 1 point
    I was on call one night and more than a little bored when a call came in for a site in Derby, closely followed by a second call for Burton on Trent. Knowing I’d be out all night I looked for something to download to fill my driving time and found a ‘Learn to Speak German’ podcast by a chap called Peter Myer I have to say, I wasn’t very good at it but, should you ever find yourself needing to say... “Hello, my name is Peter Myer” or “Go straight past the large sign” I’m your man!
  43. 1 point
    I don't suppose that it really matters in the context of the comparison between then and now, but I think that old photo of Joseph Rodgers dates from rather later than 1900. The tramway terminated in Fitzalan Square until 1908 when a single track siding was built on Flat Street, terminating opposite Sycamore Street. The line along Flat Street was only doubled and extended along Pond Street in the early 1920s.
  44. 1 point
    Might it have been the Lyceum Hotel? Photos on Picture Sheffield, showing it being surrounded by the old buildings and then the girder framework of the new GPO building... http://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s21620&pos=68&action=zoom&id=24104 http://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s21621&pos=69&action=zoom&id=24105 A Tennants house and in the right location?
  45. 1 point
    I remember an eccentric old lady (Nora?) who used to stride around the bus station shouting at all and sundry.
  46. 1 point
    It was the ending of cheap bus fares that I will remember. The adult fare of just 10p.
  47. 1 point
  48. 1 point
    I would be surprised if you can't buy oatcakes in a grocers shop or supermarket, though they will not be as nice as home made like the recipe above. In Scotland they are traditionally made on a girdle, (girdle not griddle as in England and Ireland). The girdle would originally have hung over an open fire. Picture here of one brand of oatcakes and a girdle. (c) https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=oatcakes&safe=off&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjKqYyFp-LSAhWKLMAKHcKdCGoQ_AUIBigB&biw=1025&bih=384#imgrc=-QmESgXL_7SGPM: and https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=scottish+girdle&safe=off&tbm=isch&imgil=MHt8OcCD5ZJoUM%3A%3Bm_Hv6CEKAQNVEM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Foakden.co.uk%252Fproduct%252Fscottish-irish-girdle-griddle%252F&source=iu&pf=m&fir=MHt8OcCD5ZJoUM%3A%2Cm_Hv6CEKAQNVEM%2C_&usg=__gvnAP3SWDe8rNQhpj-5_Q8AjsPo%3D&biw=1025&bih=384#imgrc=MHt8OcCD5ZJoUM:
  49. 1 point
    Hi again. I have two more photos, for the preceding and following seasons. In the latter my dad Clifford was captain and Firth's were champions of the Raleigh League. I also have his medals, gold that year but two seasons later 1922-23 silver, runners up in the Drake League, so I wonder if Drake was a promotion from Raleigh. The inscription on the silver suggests they were the Sheffield and District Works Sports Association, which still has a website, but no longer seems to include football. All pictures attached. I wonder why they were named after Elizabethan sailors, and if there were any other divisions.
  50. 1 point
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