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Showing content with the highest reputation since 22/09/20 in Posts

  1. I don't know whether it's to do with the lockdown & Covid precautions and we are mainly staying at home but much of the site recently, has been taken up with photo's, videos etc of what's happening in the city centre now. Others may feel differently but I personally am not the slightest bit interested in today's modern Sheffield because I feel that the council and planners have ripped the heart out of everything this city meant to me. There was a bit of chat about the old Coles Bros etc but many seem not to care too much about the resulting demise of John Lewis and think it was too expensive anyway. As Debenhams has suffered the same fate, the result is that If you like wandering around department stores, then apart from Atkinson's (long may they survive), there is no point in going to town at all. In my early days of marriage, I was lucky enough to get the tenancy of the house next door to where I was born. It was left full of very good quality but quite old furniture. The first thing I did was chop it all up and buy modern, early 60's furniture throughout (the thought makes me shudder now) and only in later years did I realise my stupid mistake. I don't think Sheffield Council have had that realisation yet but, as in my case, it's now too late to rectify it. I view lots of old videos and photos of old Sheffield and it brings one close to tears when you see all those MASSIVE crowds of people scurrying about like ants in the old city centre, and compare that with the lifeless and soulless scenes of today. You would think we had endured a nuclear holocaust and the end of the world was nigh. I remember crossing the footbridge, (never seen any photos of this) to the old Castle Fish market with my Grandma in the early 40's and enjoying cockles or mussels or, better still, chips, pie & peas from a stall which I still took my family to more than half a century later and basked in the nostalgia of those poor but happy days. The old Rag & tag market was equally as much loved. What will younger generations get nostalgic about in years to come but a dead city centre which will look nice although soulless until it's covered in graphiti, beer cans and litter.
    6 points
  2. Here are a selection of paintings by a Sheffield artist who was active in the very early 1800's, W Botham. There's not much information available but apart from the late birth date I'd say he was William Hallam Botham, born 23rd April 1790 to Eleanor and George Botham. George Botham was a Confectioner and Glass and China merchant in 1792, based at Irish Cross, selling raisins, nuts, lemons, prunes etc. In August 1797 the business was at 14 Market Place. William Botham was a fellow apprentice of Francis Chantrey when they were both at Ramsey's carver and gilder, High Street. Later, Chantrey worked in a room above a confectionery shop in the High Street kept by a man named Botham - possibly George?
    6 points
  3. Hello I just finished writing the code for this Watermills of Sheffield page, it's an interactive map showing all the locations of the watermills listed in the book 'The Water-Mills of Sheffield' by W.T. Miller published in 1947. Tap on a mill for its name, and tap on the name for the description from the book. https://www.g7smy.co.uk/history/watermills/ I've written it for use on a mobile phone, for when you are out and about, and on this the GPS can be used to show your location. It will also work with a desktop PC. Thanks Karl.
    6 points
  4. Just found this picture of the Albert Hall amongst my mother-in-laws old photos - it says it was taken just after the fire
    4 points
  5. I recall having just passed the dreaded 11 plus back in 54 and was destined for the "Redcaps". That summer, a group of us...all off to different schools in September.. decided that this would doubtless be our last summer of "playing around". ( how wrong we were) We constructed a trench system, of sorts, on Hartley Brook and spent ,what seemed like weeks, firing off masses of caps at one another. We then in a moment of inspiration diverted the meandering "Brook" and gave the old Wortley Rural District a few square yards of extra land. The semi drained WW2 static water tank was reflooded , by diverting the Brook, and this became the place where we "punted" on an old Fletchers bread van roof panel. All innocent stuff.( I think).no drugs...no drink and no electronics and how we enjoyed ourselves!☺️
    3 points
  6. Once again, I found your video of Killamarsh Station to be fascinating, although I did find my eyes watering just a little, when I realised as to how much this scene has changed since my youth. So, I have again taken the opportunity of sharing with you, some images taken by myself in “happier times”, i.e. 1977, when this section of the line remained open, as a freight only route in order to serve collieries at Staveley. For a potted, though relatively detailed description and history of both, the station and the railway, I recommend the Disused Station Website, link below: http://disused-stations.org.uk/k/killamarsh/index.shtml I hope that you can relate them back to the remains and locations shown in your video. GCR001-Killamarsh Central Station-Down Platform, 16/06/1977 GCR002-Killamarsh Central Station-Looking North, 16/06/1977 GCR003-Killamarsh Central Station-Looking North, 16/06/1977 GCR004-Killamarsh Central Station, EEVF.E3615-D1014/1966, Class 20, No.20144 & EEVF.E3616-D1015/1966, Class 20, No.20145, 16/06/1977 GCR005-Killamarsh Central Station-Up Platform, 16/06/1977 GCR006-Killamarsh Central Station-Looking North, 16/06/1977 GCR007-Killamarsh Central Station-Looking North, 16/06/1977
    3 points
  7. Thank you very much for posting your video. I really enjoyed watching the same. It’s a very long time indeed since I last visited the L. D &. E. C. R., and I am both, amazed and saddened by how much this long defunct line has changed so much in the past 40+ years. I have taken the opportunity of sharing with you, some images taken by myself in “happier times”. I hope that you can relate them back to the remains and locations shown in your video. LDE001-Upperthorpe and Killamarsh Station Site, Looking North Towards Beighton-16/06/1977 LDE003-Upperthorpe and Killamarsh Station Site, Looking North Towards Beighton-16/06/1977 LDE007-BTL.537/1964, Class 47, No.47180 at Upperthorpe and Killamarsh Station Site, Looking South Towards Spinkhill-16/06/1977 LDE008-BTL.537/1964, Class 47, No.47180 at Upperthorpe and Killamarsh Station Site, Looking North Towards Beighton-16/06/1977 LDE011-Killamarsh Junction, LD&ECR bridge over Waleswood Curve, Looking North Towards Beighton-16/06/1977 LDE019-Meadowgate Lane, Beighton-LD&ECR Bridge over Norwood Colliery-Killamarsh (M.R.) Branch, View South towards Killamarsh-09/06/1977 LDE020-BTL.525/1964, Class 47, No.47168 at LD&ECR Bridge over Norwood Colliery-Killamarsh (M.R.) Branch (with GCR Bridge Foreground)-09/06/1977 LDE029-ECR/1977, Class 56, No.56024 at Killamarsh Junction, LD&ECR bridge over Waleswood Curve, on ex-Westhorpe Colliery Mineral Train-14/07/1977
    3 points
  8. I'm afraid that I disagree with that Dave, as my family and fore bears, like all those around us, shopped in the Rag & Tag, Castle Market, and Norfolk Market Hall, all their lives without dying of food poisoning or anything similar. We didn't battle for expensive parking places as we walked from Heeley to town, did our shopping and walked home again. In the old days there were no suburban supermarkets so we did much of our shopping at our local shops but always went to town on Saturdays and at holiday times besides works lunch times. I, personally always enjoyed shopping in town and, for that reason, I also never let my fingers do the walking as this is responsible for the demise of shops and the death of the city centres. The minute we have a power outage, everyone will suddenly find that they can't buy anything which doesn't sound good if we suffer a cyber attack. I prefer to buy things in shops, who pay their taxes and help to pay the cost of keeping everything running. Our present lifestyle is unsustainable and will change whether we like it or not. Yes, we have changed along with the town centres but we are going to have to change back again. It's laughable that we now have wider pavements than we ever had but hardly any pedestrians. Compare that with the throngs of pedestrians we saw in the old days. We are going to finish up with a city centre of fancy paving but no shops except cafes and coffee bars and good luck with the visible police presence. I hope to NOT live long enough to see the finished article
    3 points
  9. You really would have to have been born into a certain class of society and in a certain period to really appreciate the benefits of the rag n tag, Norfolk Market Hall and Dixon Lane. It wasn't about prices (which were as low as they could get), nor was it about quality (which was as varied as you chose), it was about COMMUNITY. A community that travelled together on trams and buses, not cars, that walked long distances without thinking it extraordinary, that faced hardships such as coal rationing, very long snowbound winters and basic foodstuffs and which above all related to one another. This last part applied on the streets, in the pubs, in the churches, and in the mucky, disease provoking workshops of an industrial city which was proud of its name. Those contributors here who denigrate the atmosphere of the Saturday markets can not have had a life rooted in such fertile ambience. You could not go "to town" on a Saturday without meeting several acquaintances or relatives. It was a village atmosphere in a city. Now such puritan architecture experts try to re-create such an ambience with false identities like Poundbury. You can't. Meadowhall will never be like the rag n tag. It was there. We loved it. We missed it and will miss it for all our remaining days along with the colourful characters who you see in the historic black and white photos. Cherish the photos. Regret that you didn't experience it. For it was US....US SHEFFIELDERS...us carrying coal from the canal wharf in a barrow, picking up horsemuck for the tiny rosebed in the backyard, clearing the snow off our front, spreading coke on icebound steep footpaths, and visiting family every Saturday on Sunday, unannounced but always welcomed. This WAS life! A postal order from your grandad at Christmas was like a win on the treble chance. An apple and an orange a fruitful bounty. Everything that came after that was, by comparison, shallow and lifeless. You can have your nightclubs and your cocktail bars. You have NOT lived. The writer's grandmother sold flowers in Dixon Lane from an upturned fruitbox. She was killed by an unlicensed teenage driver as she crossed East Bank Road on her way home . RIP Martha Westnidge. RIP the best days of our life.
    3 points
  10. I can understand that, I once fell from off a thirty foot ladder, luckily I was on the bottom rung.
    3 points
  11. Hi Athy, I've not heard 'Like Knitting Sand' or 'Plaiting Fog...' before. When I worked for Derbyhire CC in the early 90's one of my colleagues used to say 'It's Like Knitting Fog!' She was usually referring to the complete nonsense which senior people came out with in meetings. Another expression which came out of those meetings was 'Purposeful Dithering'. I little later on another 'bright spark' came up with 'Bullshit Bingo'. Everytime somebody came out with a nonsense expression in a meeting he would tick a card and then when he had a straight line shout 'House'. Unfortunately none of this stopped the constant flow of 'hot air'!!! Wazzie Worrall.....
    3 points
  12. I was looking through some photos I had saved, and what a surprise, the London Road shop 🙂
    3 points
  13. Len, the pub you mention (Bagshawe Arms) is still there, and the site is relatively untouched/neglected, but its a great site for wildlife. Although the buildings are gone, you can still make out the original layout of the site today. A small section of the original road is still there, from before they made the dual carriageway, that section survives as a curved lay-by where I've marked the arrow. I believe this is where the original main entrance was?...
    3 points
  14. The answer can be found on this link: https://twitter.com/NancyFielder/status/1350788532835667972
    3 points
  15. It was chucking it down!!. Mum and dad took me to see the parade and we stood on the Moor in front of British Home Stores, which as the doors were set back offered a bit of shelter. I remember the lights on the illuminated trams going past and being soaked. Apparently I told dad I wanted to be a tram driver, he told me not to be so daft, but then again I was only three years old. Fast forward thirty odd years and I joined the tramway museum at Crich, and eventually got to be a tram driver, and got to drive the Last Tram I had seen that night.
    3 points
  16. This conversation sounds like an audition for the Teletubbies.
    3 points
  17. I've noticed that in several supermarkets the cashier, after I've paid her, will often end the exchange with a "See you later." My response is sometimes, "Usual place?"
    2 points
  18. End of an era as John Lewis closes in Barkers Pool in Sheffield City Centre Often spoken about as the heart of Sheffield City Centre, John Lewis (previously Cole Brothers) will not be here anymore Did you shop here?
    2 points
  19. The largest congregation of Yellow Bins known. There are six visible in this postcard
    2 points
  20. Built at Gorton, in 1914, to works number 435, Class 04, No.63624, (Shed No. 41A, Darnall), stands near Tinsley South Junction Signal Box. The view is looking towards Tinsley West Junction, with the extensive Hadfield and Co. Ltd., East Hecla Works on the left hand side. Taken September 1960. Copyright Retained. The locomotive would appear to be standing roughly where Meadowhall South Tram Stop stands today, although I am sure that some of our more technically competent readers could nail the spot exactly.
    2 points
  21. Correct, I told our Arry the same following im failing is ier national.
    2 points
  22. This attached photo of the Boston Hotel / Derby, 10 Lansdowne Road, on left of the Lansdowne pub at 2-4 Lansdowne Road. Apart from the Quixall family with Harry & Annie, it makes sense as it is a Stones pub which they got based on the success of the Stones brewery 'beer-off' on Charlotte Street which was pretty much run as a pub. Harry did the cooking and Annie ran the beer.
    2 points
  23. As promised here is the video of my recent visit
    2 points
  24. My dad had done his stint in the War and had no problem with it all. Let’s be honest everything in the 50s was talking about it or harking back to it. There were endless war films and boys comics were full of stories about beating the Jerries . Take that Fritz !! So if we weren’t out in the woods beating the Hun we were emulating our cowboy heroes who were also constantly in films or on tv. Everyday for me it was playing army or cowboys. From about 5 upwards . Throw in a kick about in the park and that was my childhood . No car, so no day trips or very few. You just amused yourself and didn’t expect somebody to entertain you like my own kids eventually did and my grandkids constantly do. Give the kids guns and get them off their XBoxes !!
    2 points
  25. Another card by Wilson's, showing High Street, note the 'Toys' advert seen on the tram 🙂
    2 points
  26. People tracking me on the two leading Sheffield Forums will know I was a bobby in B Div before I became a journalist and broadcaster. Three years of patrolling Burngreave, St Philips, Hanover, Broomhall, and Sharrow was enough to confirm what I had learned as a kid at Sharrow from 1942 onwards.....that these communities had a solid gold centre that could not be replicated in Gleadless Valley, Mosbrough or anywhere else. On the night of the hurricane in 63 I was on night duty in the Ellesmere Road area and stayed on duty until 3 o clock the following afternoon where people were trying to salvage their belongings from rows of collapsed terraced houses. It was a Blitz scenario. Ordinary people became heroes and heroines. If you don't know what I'm talking about you were not there, not old enough, or just in denial. In my later job I walked among Royalty, politicians, celebrities and artists. The people of old Sheffield were way above them all. No pretence. Just honesty about who they were and who they wanted to be. I loved them all. Still do.
    2 points
  27. I mentioned this topic to a retired Councillor friend and she reminded me that during the MASSIVE slum clearances of the 50/60s ,when whole local communities and their infrastructure were being discarded/destroyed to be rehoused in new Council estates and high rise flats, its affects on mental health was such that Sheffield had one of the highest incidences of suicide in the UK. Sheffield was, indeed, a wealthy City...in parts. It was said that outside of London our Rolls Royce dealer (Hoffman's?) sold more "Rollers" than anywhere else. That said, there was poverty...even post War and with full employment. The lot of a steel works labourer, married, with a couple of children and a wife who didn't work ( as most didn't once they had children) and with little "overtime" was one of belt tightening at all times. Similarly, many widows had a hard time of things especially if they had no close living relatives. All of the above is history as much as dates and battles ( beloved of my old history masters).
    2 points
  28. That’s the company that published postcard and whose name runs up the left edge. Also their logo in the top centre JW&SS. Here’s another card published by them, https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Sheffield-Fargate-Edwardian-Half-Penny-Stamp-John-Wilson-Son-Postcard-/402175968921 Assume they were photographers, printers, publishers, but some clues to suggest they might have been toy importers and dealers. Also, not sure where exactly on Fargate? https://www.sheffieldforum.co.uk/topic/150299-willson-and-gumpets/
    2 points
  29. They were probably attracted by the roundabout, giving them easy access to the Parkway 😀
    2 points
  30. The Sharrow Cycling club used to organise "The Sharrow Sports" bicycle track racing on the track that used to be around the cricket pitch at Bramall Lane in the late 1800's Here are a few pictures from the club album.
    2 points
  31. It's a gorgeous building! 😍 - The negative is from knowing it's past association with death, poverty, the misery and stigma of no choice; it's not the building itself? Imagine it's a library or town hall.. (I find 'modern'/60s style blocks to be the scary ones! The new construction in town so unnecessarily ugly and demoralising, squatting over like they're arrogantly intended to say your city's history never mattered) - My relatives share the N'Gen aversion, the spookiness that most raised in 20thC Sheffield feel about the place, though one who worked there years also liked that the grounds are a wildlife oasis; foxes, owls, ect! Real shame the Workhouse Records got destroyed; Council claim 'most' were lost in 1940s air-raids, other sites say most were deliberately destroyed in 1970s, either way gone and a big loss to our history. Researching ancestry - a far more depressing pastime than I'd anticipated as they were all poor; lives of unfair grimness & tragedy that make mine seem an over-privileged picnic - I've found many connections to Sheff. Workhouses. As well as the valuable book and the site mentioned above (where I found a photo' of a 'Scattered' foster home with a distant relative on; very precious)- I found this link, not sure it's much use, but might be to someone - many records are currently free to access online via FindMyPast, due to Sheff Library being CoronaV-closed; have to email Archives dept for a password. http://www.calmview.eu/SheffieldArchives/CalmView/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&id=CA41
    2 points
  32. Well DaveJC , unfortunately the 48 is the giveaway and I’m 73 this year. Ive also looked at some of the pictures on the 50s thread and can well remember the bombed out buildings in the process of being rebuilt. C&A Modes always sticks in my mind as the tram stop to Firth Park was outside and is a reminder of trips from Totley to visit my grandparents. There were temporary buildings at the bottom of the Moor where it had been flattened. I watched it all being rebuilt but didn’t warm to a single redevelopment, Those blackened substantial buildings that remained and were the essence of the town centre were removed and replaced with concrete and glass . It constantly annoys me when I’m told by historians ,that are half my age, what a grim, grey and miserable time it was in post war Britain. I never felt that , nor does anyone that I personally know who lives to tell the tale. They were times of hope. The streets of Sheffield were filled with warmth and good humour and were filled with people who were proud to be Sheffielders. It was a safe place and people looked after each other. The brutalist buildings that replaced the old and familiar seem to reflect the gradual decline in those attitudes. There’s so much I could add but I’m sure somewhere along the line I’d end up being too controversial
    2 points
  33. This must be after the war, the film Two Men and a Girl in the last photo wasn't released until 1947. Nigel L
    2 points
  34. Too many really Just part of the journey in the decline of the Sheffield we’d all known and loved
    2 points
  35. The European cup, once lost, wss subsequently handed in at West Bar Police Station http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/8709846.stm It was the most prized piece of silverware in European club football - but one night in a pub in the West Midlands, it went missing. Twenty-eight years later the story of how two teams of police officers played to win the European Cup can finally be told. Very few people knew about the disappearance and subsequent recovery of this famous piece of football silverware in Sheffield. A secret kept for the last 28 years. In May, 1982, Aston Villa were the kings of Europe, having just won the most prestigious club prize - the European Cup. The then 22-year-old Villa left back, Colin Gibson, along with midfielder Gordon Cowans, brought the gleaming trophy home after a one-nil victory against Bayern Munich in Rotterdam. Gibson recalls how, in celebratory mood, the pair took the gigantic silver cup, which weighs up to 15kg, out of the boot of the car and took it into a pub. "We used to go out and take the European Cup where we could to show it to the fans… and let them have their pictures taken with it," says Gibson. They were celebrating with supporters at the the Fox Inn in Hopwas, near Tamworth, in the club's native West Midlands. "Gordon and I had had a few drinks, and we were playing a competitive darts match, when someone turned round and said 'the cup's gone, it's been stolen'. Folklaw "At the time you didn't really realise what was happening. All I can remember is dread and trying to block it out as if it didn't really happen." To this day none of the players knew where the cup had disappeared to. But a collection of policemen on night shift 100 miles away in Sheffield knew exactly where it had gone. Mick Greenough, was the officer on duty that night at West Bar Police station in Sheffield city centre. Sheffield policemen on how European Cup went missing "I remember the lad on the desk walked through to the control room and said we've got a man at the front desk who says he's got the European Cup in the car. So off he trotted and next thing the swing doors go and there he is at the front desk with the European Cup, with claret and blue ribbons on." Graham Wragg, then a 24-year-old constable, says they rang West Midlands Police to try to find out where the cup had come from, but they put the phone down saying they had a major incident on. Puzzle "So we rang back, and said we think we know what your major incident is… We said 'we think we've got the European Cup here, would that be connected to it?' There was a bit of a silence and they said 'we're coming to fetch it!'" These football-mad young men had already formed their own team from the members of their shift. The chance was too good to miss and they decided to stage their own European Cup final - the prize being the feted piece of silverware itself. Former Aston Villa left back Colin Gibson recalls what happened They picked two teams in the middle of the night, in full uniform in the garage at the back of the station, and had their photographs taken holding the cup. In 1982 the only cameras readily available were those used by scene of crime officers, who it is believed took the pictures. For 28 years this story has been kept a secret between those involved. It has only come to light now because the photographs were discovered at the station, which is being cleared out and closed down. All these years the story has been met with disbelieved and treated as folklore at the Fox Inn near Tamworth, from where the cup vanished that night. The pub's current manager, Robbie James Pimberley, confirms it was "a popular place for the Villa players back then". "As you take over new pubs you get the histories… that was one of the first things I was told. I never knew what to believe. Now I know it's true. It's great to hear the Sheffield policemen played each other for the European Cup. It's what dreams are made of for young lads." But one final bit of the puzzle remains. Who actually stole the cup? The pictures show a man standing next to the police officers, but his face has been rubbed out and no-one can remember who he was. Nobody has been able to track him down, but there is a police station in Sheffield who would very much like to hear from him.
    2 points
  36. This map was posted on Twitter by the 'Picture Sheffield' website. I hadn't seen it before and thought others might be interested in browsing it. Apologies if it has been posted before. https://www.picturesheffield.com/maps.php?file=008
    2 points
  37. UK Grid Reference Finder https://gridreferencefinder.com/ "High Bradfield SK273 937" https://gridreferencefinder.com?gr=SK2730093700|SK273_s_937|1&t=SK273 937&v=r
    2 points
  38. A cement train jumped the points at Midland Station at the North end on the 11 November. Seventeen Wagons came off the rails and one turned over ripping the wheels out of the mounting! Somebody filmed it the same day
    2 points
  39. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9F_9ck-uOgc https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9F_9ck-uOgc
    2 points
  40. OK not strictly buses/trams, here are a couple of photos from a large transport archive showing inspection of a taxi at East Bank Garage following a collision in 1965. They are Sheffield Transport originals so a record of the incident. Also text from rear. Hope they may be of interest.
    2 points
  41. All six uploaded to your site.
    2 points
  42. I agree entirely, I don't think many people, certainly of my age, would normally walk across a grave or gravestone, but this forces them to do so.
    2 points
  43. I think we have but it is excellent - I was looking at a couple of those houses on Abbeyfield and on Scott Road and thought there was something unusual about them. I was also wondering how they windened the Workhouse gates and seeing the photo on here I realised there were double gate posts and they have removed the inner set!
    2 points
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