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  1. 5 points
    Hi all, so glad I found this site, so much history in one place. I was born at walkley in 65, moved to Bubwith rd Brightside where my mum was born and grandparents lived. From there we lived in a cottage in Roe Woods, my dad became one of the first 6 park patrollers, on motorbikes, in Sheffield while at Roe Wood. From there we moved to Shiregreen where mum still lives. Dad was born at the bottom end of Bellhouse rd. Have lived in a few places in Sheffield and now 20 years in Chesterfield. Looking forward to reading lots more and to dig up some of my own memories and photos to share with everyone. :-))
  2. 4 points
    Last year's thread and I rediscovered this 35mm slide which seems to fit appropriately into this one.Taken in June 1963 when rear loaders were favourite and steam locos much in evidence at Midland Station.
  3. 3 points
    Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12
  4. 3 points
    For your information the letters on the bridge BB & JH refer to Benjamin Blonk and John Huntsman. Blonk Street was so called because when it was made the "tilt" shown on the map on the river side of Blonk St.was "The Wicker ***" belonging to the Blonk Family. On the other side of Blonk St. was "The Wicker Wheel" also belonging to the Blonk Family. You will also see a third grinding shop belonging to the Blonks at the end of the dam to the right of "Blonk Island". Later on John Huntsman had a Huntsman Melting Furnace at the end of the Wicker Tilt building. If you look through the large window nearest to Blonk Bridge you will see the chimney of the Huntsman furnace preserved as a monument. Remember the old Sheffield saying "Down T'Wicker were t'water goes o'er t'weir" the weir on the upstream side of Ladys Bridge diverted water to the Wicker Tilt and Wicker Wheel. I learnt all about this by carrying out research for descendants of this branch of the Blonk family who live in Australia. My Blonk family come from a later branch of the Blonk family
  5. 3 points
    I've read somewhere that the flats that face Lady's bridge and Nursery Street were originally called Castle House, the windows just above the river was where the dogs were kept when it was a Dogs Home when it re-located there from the Pond Street area in c1900 I think , it wasn't used for long as it was always damp because of the river often flooding the place. The ornamental front door was the entrance and you can still make out the name. At the end of the walk on Blonk Street bridge you can see the initials of one of the men who ran the stables there plus possibly the vets initials too, the chap that owned and ran the stables also had stabling and shoeing available at 30-36 Burton Road now known as the Yellow Arch Recording Studios but the Horseshoe above the arch tells just what it was .
  6. 2 points
    Hi Syrup Thank you for the news article clipping. It's very tantalising close apart from one minor detail the name in the article states G Lyon not J Lyon. However, the date and stables are spot on which leads me to believe Joseph Lyon worked at Sheffield Tramway Company. Joseph (27) married Emma(22) in 1869, the two witnesses are George (53) & Ann Lyon (55). His father is named Thomas so judging by the age gap George is probably Joseph's uncle. They come from a farming background in Lincolnshire so working together with horses makes sense. In 1883 George would have been aged 67 hence the article (oldest servant) makes it more probable that it was presented to George rather than Joseph, who was only 41 at that time. Joseph died (unknown) not long after aged just 44 and was buried at Heeley Christ Church on 2nd Jan 1887. So another connection to the article (he is now going to Heeley). I can only assume that the inscriber perhaps made an unlikely error with the initial on the trophy? I can't find a record of George & Ann having children hence the trophy must have been passed down to one of Joseph's two sons. I did find a very interesting post on this site on the STC and will make contact to see if any employee records still survive and hopefully will provide the proof that George & Joseph did work together. https://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/topic/154-sheffield-trams/ Again thanks for the clipping. John O.
  7. 2 points
    If my memory serves me well, it doesn't usually, I seem to remember that it was used as a stand for milk churns awaiting collection. I may possibly remember a fellow miscreant trying to get one of the lids off to quench a thirst but if pressed I would plead the UK version of the fifth amendment
  8. 2 points
    It really frustrates me that not enough is known about Sheffield Castle. We don't really seem to have any information at all on this place considering what an important Sheffield structure it was. Sheffield Castle is still an enigma. Why is that?
  9. 2 points
    modern 'journalism' at its finest. Hide behind youtube and stir some s***. It brought the city together, made us very proud to be sheffielders and remembered the lads who paid the ultimate sacrifice. who plants the bedding plants and sweeps up from time to time is of little or no consequence. I dont see what youre trying to achieve by posting it to be honest.
  10. 2 points
    Anyone living in any of these houses may be interested in this postcard on Ebay. ------------------- https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/173604248815?ul_noapp=true Google Street View -------https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.3837307,-1.4973794,3a,75y,81.23h,90.51t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s24w0G3NbxJMMlYOd7eyZgw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656?hl=en
  11. 2 points
    Probably of no interest to anyone else, but one of the photos here shows the location of my Dad’s bench, sited and dedicated to his memory for almost twenty years now...
  12. 2 points
  13. 2 points
    Was down at Crich last week. 510 was being moved late in the afternoon and is looking very smart.
  14. 2 points
    This is a recommendation for a book available from Amazon (£8 well spent) - an edited and updated version (with corrections and new information and pictures) of James Hayton Stainton's "Past Chapters in Sheffield History". It was originally published in 1918 for the benefit of prisoners of war. It's very good on old street layouts and especially the background to the High Street widening. There is a "Look Inside" feature on the Amazon site that allows skinflints to read some of its pages: Past Chapters in Sheffield History - Amazon Link
  15. 2 points
    There was a pub called the Rising Sun on Hunshelf Road at Stocksbridge directly across the road from the billet mill. In the billet mill large ingots were rolled at yellow heat down into blooms of say up to 4" plus square, and then cut up on a hot saw into lengths to suit the customers. In an early application of technology the blooms were measured for length and a very early computer made by Elliot Automation determined the best cuts to make out of a given length to suit the various customers. The computer use first generation germanium transistors and had a 1K magnetic core store for it's memory. The pub was obviously very (too) convenient for the parched workforce and I was told the Fox's had bought out the licence and closed and demolished the pub in 1967. My connection with this came in the early nineteen seventies when I parked my A35 van (Wallace & Gromit Mobile) on the cleared ground of the pub in order to carry out the " Redex Treatment". This consisted of running around until the engine was hot, parking up, removing the air filter; and pouring a can full of Redex engine detergent/cleaner into the top of the carb. This was supposed to clear the valve stems and piston rings and restore performance. It also produced huge quantities of black smoke. When I started this procedure I had failed to notice the large billet mill high voltage substation downwind just a few yards away. I'd also forgotten that large substations often used photo-electric ray fire detection in case of fire in the oil-filled switchgear. I'd just got about half the can of Redex in the engine and couldn't see a hand in front of my face when there was a loud bang from the substation and the loud whine from the billet mill opposite wound down to a worrying silence. The penny dropped ! I flung the air filter inside the car, shut down the bonnet and was speeding back down the hill in the opposite direction to where I knew the high voltage gang would be approaching within about ten seconds. My stealthy departure was not helped by a smoke trail that the Red Arrows would have been proud of. I think I got away with it 'so don't tell anyone. hilldweller.
  16. 2 points
  17. 2 points
    The demolition of Sheffield in the 1960's, 1970's & 1980's a blaze was the sky with fires from the demolition sites there were only a few known Sheffield Companies at the time A.D.H Demolition Limited (contracted to Sheffield Council) A. Whites Demoliiton Ltd Childs Demolition Ltd Demex Ltd J. Whites Ltd and later T.D.E (Rotherham) (ancestors of A. Whites demolition) i remember as an only child going with my parents to the demolition sites, i remember the black sooty days crooks moor was ablaze with fires and being situated on a hill you could look across Sheffield and see other contractors lighting the sky. The forgotten demolition men and woman contractors that made Adolf Hitler assault on sheffield oblivious. The Sheffield Council pillaged property with compulsory purchase took peoples homes and business for pittance of monies, i remember sometimes wed pull houses down leaving the odd one still standing whilst the owners or tenants were fighting for their legal rights to stay or be given a better deal. Sheffield Council insisted on the demolition of what we would see today as historical buildings but to the council they was drab, nuisance and needed to be pulled down our sheffield architecture of centuries past were stone masons are not of what is today ended up a pile of rubble and down the tip it went. Odd pieces will have survived and relocated without knowing and the next generation losing site. I know the red set that lay on the floor in kelham island were taken from the Sheffield Abattoir and re laid in the museum yet a piece of history is lost again and no mention of where they arrived from they just part of the decor of the museum yet in truth is part of a bigger history. i attach a stone fireplace my parents built in a property still in the sheffield area, the new owners of that property will never know the history of that house or where that huge fireplace with its ornate archway came from. The archway formed the door way to the GAS HOUSE on commercial Street its were you paid your account (its historic significance to Sheffield is when sheffield turned from Candle Light to Gas. i attach another photo of a font that was part of the St josephs convent, common side htpp://www.yorkshirefilmarchive.com/film/environmental-health-part-park-hill-slums-1-5 I'm hoping a log can be made on this site for anyone to upload demolition photographs and maybe if theres any demolition men left that worked on these site can contribute before history is lost. I was a fortunate person i know much of sheffield i lived the era and a breathed it with my family. Im trying to see if we can make a single page where all the data of the lost (demolished) can be found, before it is too late. I want to see what the public holds before i update this site again with All the 1000 pictures and documents i hold of Sheffield
  18. 2 points
    171 on corner of Alfred Street and Dane Street https://www.old-maps.co.uk/#/Map/437500/389500/13/101329
  19. 2 points
    I remember as a child in the '70s being so proud of that fountain because my Dad had told me that it had been made (partially at least) at Bramahs, which he worked at as a fabricator for some years Cant honestly remember if Dad had actually had anything to do with its construction, but in my head 'My Dad made that!', and I told anyone that would listen !
  20. 2 points
    Picture Sheffield gives date as 22 July 1961 ( spot on boginspro!) which was a Saturday. The AEC Regent III - VWJ 541 was one of nine Roe bodied vehicles out of 85 AEC's delivered in 1956/57 for tram replacement services, seen here on Route 24 to Tinsley. Used to love the smell of Ground coffee which drifted out of Davy's.
  21. 2 points
    A stunning bit of film. Anyone seen this before?http://www.yorkshirefilmarchive.com/film/environmental-health-part-park-hill-slums-1-5
  22. 2 points
    Not sure if we already have a drinking fountain thread, but this image posted by Aiden Stones on his Twitter account is fantastic. It shows the drinking fountain that was at the junction of Gibraltar St, Allen St and Bowling Green Street, and todays view from Moorfileds facing towards Penistone Rd.. https://twitter.com/OldSheffield
  23. 2 points
    One of my husband's hobbies is collecting transport tickets, and occasionally in the bits of paper he buys something interesting turns up, such as this one. It is a ticket for the City Clopper, a horse bus which operated in the city in the early 1980s: I remember reading about the horse bus but I wasn't living in Sheffield at the time and I don't think I ever saw it operating. A short film about the service:
  24. 2 points
  25. 2 points
    If you follow the supertram which is blurred above to the road, is where the church would have been. Possibly where the big tree is now. Also I note that Midland Station has now lost it's first foot bridge.
  26. 2 points
    I think there was just a crossover for the trams to change tracks for the return journey, but then that's all a tram needs. I worked buses to Vulcan Road in later days but we went round the loop. I think there was a row of basic tin topped shelters on the return track side. Quite a number of trams and later buses were needed there when shifts changed in the steel works, some of them being workers special routes. I have recently seen a picture of a crowd round one of the last trams on Vulcan Road but can't remember where I saw it. EDIT Not the picture I was thinking of but here is one of trams on Vulcan Road, possibly the last day,
  27. 2 points
    Hi Folks, I wrote a new blog about seeing I'm So Hollow at Romeo's & Juliet's in February 1981. Link - http://www.mylifeinthemoshofghosts.com/2017/08/26/im-so-hollow-atmosphere-at-romeos-juliets-bank-street-sheffield-wednesday-11th-february-1981/ Enjoy. Dodger
  28. 1 point
    Here are the old houses that were behind that trough, Unfortunately it is not a very wide view, I think this photo' was taken in the late 60's or early 70's. The houses and the well that fed that trough are shown on 1850's maps standing all on their own, no other houses on the road.
  29. 1 point
    Hello no spoons for me again today. Not all bad though. What do you think? The blades on these scissors are about 3 inches long. We see the "I.XL" mark clearly. On the the other side of the blade pivot area is a less clear mark that I believe says that the scissors are chromium plated.I supose dating the scissors is difficult, but they may well be from the same period as "SteveHB's" Kelly directories ad. Kalfred
  30. 1 point
    Fascinating reading. I had read other articles about the Charfield crash but not these. My grandfather was apparently a ladies' man and I suspect that his failing to give his proper name was for such reasons. I like the fact that in the above article, he is referred to as a young man when he was 46 at the time.
  31. 1 point
    The Green Man was a Public House (Bar) and ‘held the licence’ means he was the publican or landlord. 1890 map of the area with The Green Man ⭕️
  32. 1 point
    From 1893 to 1895 Jarvis Milner held the licence of the Green Man at No 23 Broad Street.
  33. 1 point
    Lets try and get it sorted out. The main pictures are of Woodbourne Hotel who played in the Attercliffe Alliance League. There are 2 sets of medals on display - being runners up in the Attercliffe Alliance Charity Cup and the runners up of Division "B" of the Attercliffe Alliance League in season 1920/21. The picture obviously was taken outside the pub as can be seen by the sign on the right-hand side of the pub. There was a Woodbourne Road WR (Wesleyan Reform) team that played in the Bible Class League. To play in the Bible Class League, the team had to be connected to a Church or Church youth club. Pub teams, like Woodbourne Hotel, were not allowed in the Bible Class League. The Attercliffe Alliance league started in 1917/18 season as the Fowler League (Named after the person that started it) For season 1918/19 it changed its name to the Attercliffe Alliance League, before dissolving at the end of the 1922/23 season. The Attercliffe Charity Cup started in season 1917/18. At the end of the War, it was a prime time for the setting up of Charity Cup Competitions with the Darnell Medical Aid and Tinsley Charity Cup being two other local competitions that started that same season. The Alliance Charity Cup ran until 1940/41. Like so many other Football competition, the loss of players to the war effort saw the end of the Competition. It would be nice to know if the cups played for in the Attercliffe competitions are still around somewhere.
  34. 1 point
    Reading some background info on Birley East Colliery, I suddenly made the connection with this thread! Funny how threads and stories criss-cross on this site? Still a grest read is this book and a 3 hour flight passed by quickly
  35. 1 point
    Sure, my pal is round for dinner next week, so I’ll ask him for the contact details for the site editor and send them to you.
  36. 1 point
    Quick update for you folks. I've continued to chip away at the corner (lower-left on this new image). Still no sign of a gap, nor "hole" - but I'll keep going! (a few inches down / in now). Also.. as another tactic, I've started clearing away more of the grass / earth (see top left section of this picture). This is (now) roughly where the concrete seems to end. The picture still does show the "mound" nature of this (though it is fairly subtle) - with that rectangular section higher up than the rest, which is the "mount" bit (the rectangular area being flat). I'll keep chipping away and update accordingly! Next part (weekend coming) will be to find the outer edge of the concrete are all the way around (continuing from top-left corner). John.
  37. 1 point
    Doesn’t look like there was anything on them??? Newly built and unadorned! http://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s05175&action=zoom&pos=53&id=8603&continueUrl=
  38. 1 point
    Attercliffe Pavilion Cinema, Attercliffe Common, 16/09/1972, and an opportunity to get your dentures repaired whilst watching the latest film release. Happy New Year Everyone.
  39. 1 point
    Attended St Mary's school on South Road, just next to the church, around 1964. Went to services from time to time as the church and school were affiliated. Lived on Duncombe Street before moving to Hillsborough.
  40. 1 point
    Love this photo, so beautiful, thanks for sharing. My favourite gem in town has to be the beautiful town hall building, I have never fully had a tour round here though, has anyone else? I have seen the odd room when I have had meetings but not a full tour. I also like the old town hall building, this looks interesting. Has anyone been in here? Both buildings have wonderful architecture, its a shame the council doesnt look after the Old town hall as much as the new.
  41. 1 point
    i know people have tried to locate the Howard Hotel that was on walkley it was near birkendale view,
  42. 1 point
    Great photo of Barkers Pool here showing the Gaumont Cinema, Sheffield City Hall and even more interestingly it's when you could actually drive up and down it!
  43. 1 point
    That was created as a result of the willingness to spend( nationally) on health...and , arguably, the provision of potable water and efficient sanitation were the building blocks for the NHS.
  44. 1 point
    The same sign appears in the Attercliffe video..
  45. 1 point
    Definitely Harringtons in Castle Market
  46. 1 point
    But we weren't just discussing a railway breakdown were we? I suggest that all forms of transport have required legislation and have only become safer with more knowledge and better technology...and that railways are no different....hence the details of shipping casualties. You seemed to suggest that early railways were lacking in safety because of a the profit motive, and this may well have been true in the very early days ( although stats show otherwise) but at the time of this crash that was far from the truth...as my own Grandfather, who drove for the GCR ,would have attested. He always maintained railways were the safest mode of travel and drivers regularly had physical examinations to ensure their fitness to drive as well as tests...all of which was overseen by HM Inspector of Railways. Not all technical problems with commercial aviation result in crashes either or, as in the amazing case of an Air Transat flight , running out of fuel because of human error, midway across the Atlantic, did! Back to the Woodhouse crash I think the loco was one of Parker's class 2 ,of which 24 were constructed, and the immigrant train was an especially interesting part of social history .Eastern Europeans( many being Jews escaping pogroms) emigrating to the USA, having crossed western Europe, caught railway steamers to the Humber ports and thence trains to take them across to Liverpool and onward to America.
  47. 1 point
    The Church hall was much smaller than this, it's entrance was on Baseldene Rd, looks more like the Vicarage
  48. 1 point
    £20 a pop is peanuts in relative terms, prior to the new contract my boss racked up £1,200 in a week in Greece, £60-70K a year contract gets the phone companies attention much more so than a one person contract.
  49. 1 point
  50. 1 point
    Pre-Norman invasion Iron Age: Brigantes constructed forts at Wincobank and Carl Wark, and the Roman Rig dyke. c55: A Roman fort was constructed at Templeborough. Early 9th century: The Sheffield Cross, an Anglo-Saxon cross was made. It is thought that this was erected on the (future) site of Sheffield Cathedral. 829: According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, King Egbert of Wessex received the submission of King Eanred of Northumbria to at the hamlet of Dore (now a suburb of Sheffield). 942: Edmund I of England re-conquered the Midlands, as far as Dore. 1000–1099 1046: A chapel was built on Carter Knowle at Ecclesall. 1069/70: Any settlements in the Sheffield area were likely destroyed in the harrying of the North. 1076: Waltheof, 1st Earl of Northampton and Lord of the manor of Hallam, was executed. 1100–1199 c1100: William de Lovetot founded a church on the (future) site of Sheffield Cathedral. c1150: William de Lovetot built a castle in Sheffield. He also had the first Lady's Bridge built, established a corn mill and hospital in the town, and founded St Mary's church at nearby Handsworth (now a suburb of the city). 1176 (or 1183): Beauchief Abbey was established 4 miles southwest of the town of Sheffield in Beauchief. 1200–1299 c1200: Metalworking began at Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet. 1266: A party of barons, led by John de Eyvill, marching from north Lincolnshire to Derbyshire passed through Sheffield and destroyed the town, burning the church and castle. c1250: Church House at Handsworth (now the Cross Keys public house) was built. c1270: A large stone castle was built to replace the wooden castle destroyed in 1266. c1280: A new church was consecrated by William II Wickwane the Archbishop of York. 1296: Sheffield was granted a royal charter to hold a weekly market and an annual fair. The first reference to Sheffield's Town Mill appears. 1297: "Robert the Cutler" is recorded in a tax return, the earliest surviving reference to the manufacture of cutlery in Sheffield. 1300–1399 c1387: Geoffrey Chaucer in The Reeve’s Tale from his book The Canterbury Tales gave an early reference to Sheffield and the metal industry for which the town would become famous. 1400–1499 1430: The 1280 parish church was pulled down and replaced with a new building, the core of the present cathedral. c1434: "Barker's Pool", Sheffield's first reservoir, was constructed. Once a month the reservoir gates were opened allowing water to wash the filth from the towns streets (with open sewers along their centres) into the River Don. c1480: The "The hawle at the Poandes" (now the Old Queen's Head public house) was built. 1485: Lady's Bridge was replaced with a new stone-built bridge, still in existence. 1500–1599 c1500: Bishops' House was built. c1510: The fourth Earl of Shrewsbury, George Talbot built the Manor Lodge outside the town. 1520: The Shrewsbury Chapel was added to Sheffield Parish Church. 1530: Cardinal Wolsey, following his arrest, was detained at the Manor Lodge for 18 days. 1537: Beauchief Abbey was dissolved, the estate becoming the property of Sir Nicholas Strelley. 1570: Mary Queen of Scots began her 14-year imprisonment at Sheffield Castle and the Manor Lodge, under the guard of George Talbot, 6th Earl of Shrewsbury 1584: Shepherd Wheel was passed to the sons of William Beighton in his will. 1600–1699 1621: Carbrook Hall was built. 1624: The Company of Cutlers in Hallamshire was formed to oversee the cutlery trade in the town. 1630: Attercliffe Chapel was built. 1638: The Company of Cutlers in Hallamshire erect the first Cutlers' Hall. 1642–1651: The English Civil Wars: 1642: The people of Sheffield seized Sheffield Castle for the Parliamentarians 1643: The castle was taken by Royalist forces. 1648: After a long siege the castle was once again taken by Parliamentarian forces, and an Act of Parliament passed for its demolition. 1700–1799 1700: Upper Chapel, the first non-conformist chapel in the city, was built. 1721: St Paul's Church is built as a chapel-of-ease to the parish church. 1736: The first buildings in Paradise Square are constructed. 1740s: Benjamin Huntsman, a clock maker in Handsworth invented a form of the crucible steel process for making a better quality of steel than had previously been available. 1743: Thomas Boulsover, working in Sheffield, invented "Sheffield plate". 1751: River Don Navigation extended to Tinsley. 1756: An Act of Parliament undertakes to turnpike the road south from Sheffield, to Chesterfield and London. c1769: Britannia metal was invented in Sheffield, originally being known as "Vickers white metal". 1771: Paradise Square is completed. 1773: Sheffield was given a silver assay office. c1775: The Duke of Norfolk commissioned plans for a new quarter, to be constructed on Alsop Fields. 1779: John Wesley preached in Paradise Square on 15 July. 1797: Sheffield Royal Infirmary opened. 1800–1899 1805: A new nave was added to the parish church. 1808: The small town hall that had stood near the parish church was replaced with a new building at the corner of Waingate and Castle Street. 1819: Sheffield Canal opened. 1832: A cholera epidemic claimed 402 lives in the town, later commemorated by the Cholera Monument. 1832: Sheffield gained representation in the House of Commons as a Parliamentary Borough 1836: Sheffield Botanical Gardens and Sheffield General Cemetery opened. 1838: A new Cutlers' Hall was built, forming the core of the current building. 1838: The first railway station in Sheffield, Sheffield Wicker station, opened on 31 October as the southern terminus of the Sheffield and Rotherham Railway. 1843: Sheffield was incorporated as a municipal borough. 1848: The Roman Catholic Church of St Marie (later a cathedral) was completed. 1848: The Wicker Arches were constructed. 1848: The parish of Sheffield was subdivided into smaller parishes. 1851: Sheffield Victoria Station opened on 15 September. 1855: Bramall Lane opened as a cricket ground. 1857: Sheffield F.C., the oldest football club in the world among those that have played, or do play, Association football (soccer), was founded. 1858: Sheffield Trades and Labour Council founded as the "Sheffield Association of Organised Trades". 1860: Hallam F.C. was founded. 1864: The Great Sheffield flood devastated large parts of the town, killing 270 people. 1864: By-laws were passed prohibiting the construction of back-to-back housing in the town. 1866: The United Kingdom Alliance of Organised Trades, a forerunner of the Trades Union Congress (TUC), was founded in Sheffield . 1867: The Sheffield Football Association founded 1867: Sheffield Wednesday F.C. was founded. 1870: Midland Main Line extension from Chesterfield to Sheffield opened, with the new terminus at Sheffield Midland station. 1873: The first trams ran in Sheffield. 1878: The first ever floodlit football match was played at Bramall Lane on 14 October. 1885: The Mappin Art Gallery opened. 1889: Sheffield United F.C. was founded. 1893: A Royal Charter granted the municipal borough of Sheffield the style and title of "city". 1897: The University of Sheffield was established. 1897: A new town hall was opened on Pinstone Street, the old building subsequently being used as the county court. 1897: The Lyceum Theatre opened. 1899: Hillsborough Stadium opened. 1900–1999 1913: Stainless steel was invented by Harry Brearley whilst working at the Brown Firth Laboratories in Sheffield. 1914: Sheffield became a diocese of the Church of England, and the parish church became a cathedral. 1919: Sheffield City Council began building council houses, mostly to the north and east of the city centre. 1926: The Labour Party first took control of the city council. 1934: Sheffield City Hall completed. 1934/35: Districts formerly in Derbyshire including Beauchief, Dore, Totley, Norton, and Woodseats were annexed by Sheffield. 1938: St Paul's Church was demolished to make way for an extension to the Town Hall. The extension was never built, and the site subsequently became the Peace Gardens. 1940: The "Sheffield Blitz"—heavy bombing over the nights of 12 December and 15 December led to the loss of over 660 lives, and the destruction of numerous buildings. 1955–1961: Park Hill flats were built. 1955–1962: The Gleadless Valley estate was built. 1965 The University of Sheffield Arts Tower was completed. 1971: The Crucible Theatre opened. 1974: The Local Government Act of 1972 led to the formation of the Metropolitan borough of Sheffield. 1974: Sheffield Parkway was opened. 1977: The "eggbox" extension to the Town Hall was built. 1979: The Royal Hallamshire Hospital opened. 1980: The Roman Catholic Diocese of Hallam was created with the Church of St Marie as its Cathedral. 1988: The Sheffield Development Corporation was established. 1989: The Hillsborough disaster—96 Liverpool F.C. fans were crushed to death at Hillsborough Stadium. 1990: The Meadowhall shopping centre opened. 1990: The Don Valley Stadium opened. 1991: Sheffield Arena and Ponds Forge opened. 1991: Sheffield hosted the World Student Games. 1994: The first section of the Sheffield Supertram network was opened. 1997: The Gatecrasher nightclub moved to Sheffield. 1997: The film The Full Monty (set in Sheffield) was released. 2000–present 2001: The Millennium Galleries opened. 2003: The Winter Gardens opened on the site of the 1977 Town Hall extension.
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