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  1. I don't know whether it's to do with the lockdown & Covid precautions and we are mainly staying at home but much of the site recently, has been taken up with photo's, videos etc of what's happening in the city centre now. Others may feel differently but I personally am not the slightest bit interested in today's modern Sheffield because I feel that the council and planners have ripped the heart out of everything this city meant to me. There was a bit of chat about the old Coles Bros etc but many seem not to care too much about the resulting demise of John Lewis and think it was too expensive anyway. As Debenhams has suffered the same fate, the result is that If you like wandering around department stores, then apart from Atkinson's (long may they survive), there is no point in going to town at all. In my early days of marriage, I was lucky enough to get the tenancy of the house next door to where I was born. It was left full of very good quality but quite old furniture. The first thing I did was chop it all up and buy modern, early 60's furniture throughout (the thought makes me shudder now) and only in later years did I realise my stupid mistake. I don't think Sheffield Council have had that realisation yet but, as in my case, it's now too late to rectify it. I view lots of old videos and photos of old Sheffield and it brings one close to tears when you see all those MASSIVE crowds of people scurrying about like ants in the old city centre, and compare that with the lifeless and soulless scenes of today. You would think we had endured a nuclear holocaust and the end of the world was nigh. I remember crossing the footbridge, (never seen any photos of this) to the old Castle Fish market with my Grandma in the early 40's and enjoying cockles or mussels or, better still, chips, pie & peas from a stall which I still took my family to more than half a century later and basked in the nostalgia of those poor but happy days. The old Rag & tag market was equally as much loved. What will younger generations get nostalgic about in years to come but a dead city centre which will look nice although soulless until it's covered in graphiti, beer cans and litter.
    6 points
  2. Here are a selection of paintings by a Sheffield artist who was active in the very early 1800's, W Botham. There's not much information available but apart from the late birth date I'd say he was William Hallam Botham, born 23rd April 1790 to Eleanor and George Botham. George Botham was a Confectioner and Glass and China merchant in 1792, based at Irish Cross, selling raisins, nuts, lemons, prunes etc. In August 1797 the business was at 14 Market Place. William Botham was a fellow apprentice of Francis Chantrey when they were both at Ramsey's carver and gilder, High Street. Later, Chantrey worked in a room above a confectionery shop in the High Street kept by a man named Botham - possibly George?
    6 points
  3. Hello I just finished writing the code for this Watermills of Sheffield page, it's an interactive map showing all the locations of the watermills listed in the book 'The Water-Mills of Sheffield' by W.T. Miller published in 1947. Tap on a mill for its name, and tap on the name for the description from the book. https://www.g7smy.co.uk/history/watermills/ I've written it for use on a mobile phone, for when you are out and about, and on this the GPS can be used to show your location. It will also work with a desktop PC. Thanks Karl.
    6 points
  4. Further to my June 3rd post about the European Heritage Days awards I'm excited and delighted to be one of the overall 2020 winners! Eleven storytellers from across the continent have won a funded Council of Europe heritage project. Mine is going to be the design of an app and website to help count and trace every single piece of historic pavement furniture in the city and to plot every such location. This will hopefully enable study of what we have, why they are important, and what they tell us. Building on the collective work of this thread I will be able to answer a few of the questions that have been raised! The work will run from September 30th till March 31st 2021 and I will mention this site in any publicity. I have been invited to address the European Parliament in November to introduce the topic and Sheffield heritage in general which I am looking forward to. Just to say many thanks again to contributors to this thread and I'm delighted that looking at Sheffield drain covers takes it's place in the favourite European heritage stories of the year http://www.europeanheritagedays.com/Story/cfbd0/Drainspotting-%40%40%40-A-European-Story%2c-Made-in-Sheffield^^^
    6 points
  5. Another photo, the ford is paved and as said is in good condition, this is taken from the Beeley Wood Lane side, have to try and get to the other bank and look for the track up to the toll house.
    5 points
  6. Hi all, so glad I found this site, so much history in one place. I was born at walkley in 65, moved to Bubwith rd Brightside where my mum was born and grandparents lived. From there we lived in a cottage in Roe Woods, my dad became one of the first 6 park patrollers, on motorbikes, in Sheffield while at Roe Wood. From there we moved to Shiregreen where mum still lives. Dad was born at the bottom end of Bellhouse rd. Have lived in a few places in Sheffield and now 20 years in Chesterfield. Looking forward to reading lots more and to dig up some of my own memories and photos to share with everyone. :-))
    5 points
  7. Bus stop out side Northern General Hospital...Herries Road End
    5 points
  8. This is a transcription of an autobiography, typed by Joseph in 1927 when he was 81. Much of it was included by Jack Branston in his History of Stocksbridge but this is from Joseph's original book and contains other material not included there. The autobiography contains details on Hathersage, Stocksbridge, Deepcar and the Fox works at Stocksbridge, and provides a few personal recollections of individuals as well. Joseph Sheldon: Reminiscences. 1845 - 1927 Early Days 1. The writer of these pages was born at Booths, Hathersage, on September 28th, 1845, being the sixth son in a family of eight boys and one girl. Parents were Mary and Joseph Sheldon. The father and two sons were Millstone Makers, which was an unhealthy trade; its workers as a rule died young. My father, at the age of 55, died, leaving a large family. Our mother died at the same age. Hathersage, 70 years ago, was an interesting and beautiful place, as it is at the present time. Food, except what the local farmers produced, had to be brought from Sheffield and other places, carriers, carts & horse ‘buses were kept busy, also there were many market carts. The coal required by the householders and manufactories had to be brought by horse and cart from Dore, Dronfield and other places. For many years, Hathersage was a very prosperous little village; besides Millstone Makers, there were three industries., Joseph Cocker & Son., Robert Cook & Son, and Tobias Child. The business was that of wire drawing, Hackle pins, Needles and other articles made from drawn wire. Robert Cook & Sons used to take wires to Padley Mill to be ground – the grinding mill stood near the present Midland Station, Grindleford Bridge. It is claimed that this was the first wire drawing mill in England. There were two other wire mills in Hathersage at that time; one in the middle of Hathersage, owned and used by Cocker Brothers, the other at the top of Hathersage. Both these mills were in active work when I was a young boy. I soured wire at both the mills at the bottom of Hathersage. This process consisted of scouring wire from a black to a bright state. The material used was burnt sandstone, crushed to a fine powder and mixed with oil, a portion of which was placed in a pad of rough flannel or old stockings made into a pad, which was gripped firmly in the right hand and rubbed backwards and forwards on a length of about three feet, then wrapped on two pegs in front of the worker. This operation continued until the whole length was scoured. Wages, two or three shillings a week, for a boy of nine or ten. Perhaps School days should have been mentioned before working days. At that time, there were two schools in Hathersage. The “Dame School” was conducted by the Aunt of Mr. Cresswell, who was the Master of the Upper School. The “Dame School” was held over the Hearse House, near the bottom of Hathersage and near to the Upper School. When attending the “Dame School” I remember that I wore a blue pinafore with white spots. Once when crossing the road near the Wesleyan Chapel, I was knocked down by a passing vehicle and was carried to the School Master’s House, near by. It was a very interesting day for the scholars when the Bread Cart came from Bakewell with loaves of bread for distribution amongst the poor people who were having parish relief. Many times these loaves were brought to the home of the writer. It was a great occasion when transferred from the “Dame School” to the Upper School. Not only boys but young men attended the Upper School during the winter months, principally farmer’s sons, who gave much trouble to the master. On one occasion, something very interesting passed through Hathersage which was followed by a number of the scholars, on its way to Castleton. These scholars returned late to school, which meant severe flogging by the Master. During the flogging, a scuffle arose between the teacher and the older scholars; the scholars resenting the punishment results. I well remember seeing the teacher and scholars down on the floor. The junior scholars escaped punishment. Although the master was a tall man, I made up my mind to have my revenge when I was big enough. School days, for the writer, were neither numerous nor pleasant and I often played truant, preferring to wander in the fields rather than lessons and cane in school. Hathersage boys, of which I was one, were much given to fighting in those days, often with one hand fastened behind. In order to see a fight, one of the bigger boys would hold out his arm and say “best cock spit over my arm” meaning that the boy who ventured to spit was considered champion if no one else followed, but usually a second boy followed and a fight was the result. One dreadful practice in some of these fights, was that the fighters were allowed to nip, scratch, lug or bite. In one of these fights, the writer received a severe thrashing from a little Warwickshire boy, who held his opponent’s head down while he gave the thrashing. When the dams at Redmires were bring made a number of the boy walked there from Hathersage on the Sunday afternoon, instead of going to Sunday School. On their return, one of the boys remembered his sins and was afraid to go home so he stopped in a corner of a field and said his prayers. He has often pointed out the place to his friends when visiting Hathersage. In those days, “Winter” was a time dreaded by the outside workers, especially the Millstone workers, when the frost was in the stone. My father and two brothers often were out of work for one, two or three months, except removing snow from the drifted-up roads in payment of the rates, also for the same purpose, the writer and an older brother walked three or four miles in the direction of Ringinglow to break stones at threepence per load. These were indeed “Hard Times” when the principle meal of the day consisted of potato and turnip pie, with oatmeal crust. I well remember one day, my mother saying that the one who was working must have the food and his dinner was several squares of Yorkshire Pudding with sauce, which I took to him at the wire mill. I also remember seeing the furniture marked and removed from the house until the rent could be paid, although the owner of the house was a relation. It was a great treat to have the opportunity of going an errand, or doing some little thing for a neighbour and receive a slice of bread and treacle or jam as payment. There were two “Saturday Pennies” in the family in those days, but a few years later I think I was the happiest boy in Hathersage when my Mother gave me two pence with which to go to Hope Fair, and this she borrowed from a kind neighbour. New suits for the younger boys depended largely on the Bilberry and Blackberry crops. My Mother, with several of the boys, would go to Bamford Bridge, Eyam Moor, Moscar and other places, sometimes more than three miles from home, gathering bilberries all day. When a sufficient quantity was gathered, they were taken to Sheffield,a distance of ten miles, and sold at 8d. per quart. I remember we usually turned off to the left at Hunters Bar going in the direction of Wesley College, and calling at the houses near there. The same was done during the Blackberry season but the Blackberries grew nearer home than the Bilberries. My Mother usually went, with one or two of the boys, to Sheffield to sell the fruit, walking all the way there and back. When sufficient money was got, suits were bought. This went on for many years. My Mother was one of the best and most capable women in Hathersage but under the above conditions it was no wonder that both Mother and Father were called Home at the early age of fifty-five and my great regret has been, that when I got to a position when I could have helped them, they were not there to be helped. Later, I was engaged by Mr. Henry Broomhead, Shopkeeper and Farmer, to do general work on the Farm. Leaving Home. Before I was thirteen years of age, I left home to live with Mr. Walker at Leadmill, where I remained three years as farmer’s boy, doing general work. I have always looked back to the years with Mr. Walker as a very happy time. My only special outfit for this, my first situation was a soft felt hat which had been my father’s and was right, however placed on the head. It was made in Bradwell by a firm of Hatmakers. During my stay with Mr. Walker, I learnt to milk cows, mow and thrash corn but my principle work was with the Horse and Cart., fetching coal from Dronfield and Holmsfield, taking wood from the Highlow Woods to these coal mines to be used as pit props. My father was taken ill the day I left home and in twenty weeks, he passed away. On the occasion of my father’s death, Mrs. Frith (mother of Mrs. Walker) gave me a black silk necktie and a pair of low shoes, which had belonged to her husband. Rather old fashioned for a boy of thirteen but were valued and worn by him. I had one difficulty here, as I had two mistresses and when in favour with one I was in disfavour with the other which made it impossible to please two mistresses. Mr. Walker was as good as a father and a true friend all the time I was with them. I always think of the three years at Leadmill as a foundation of a future healthy life. When at Leadmill I had on three occasions a narrow escape of losing my life. Once I was pulled out of the Derwent when in flood. Another occasion was the time of sheep washing. The sheep were brought from the moors and put in pens by the side of the river. I was one who helped to ring them to the washers, and possibly trying to be clever, I got on the sheep’s back, holding by its horns. Instead of the boy taking the sheep to the Washers it bounded forward in the water but was caught by the men before getting into deeper water and taken safely to land. I was wearing a pair of tight-fitting black cloth trousers and it was with difficulty I walked up the hill to make a change. I formed some very pleasant companionships with the farmers’ sons in the district, some older, some younger. Recently, I revisited the place and found some of my old companions still living, although more than sixty years since I had seen them. One family named Middleton who still live in the same farm and have lived under three Dukes of Devonshire; four brothers, their ages from 74 to 88; three are still working on the farm. We had a real Derbyshire talk when they knew I was “Joe Sheldon”. Other old associates were visited with equal interest and pleasure and we agreed to have a tea party when next I visit Leadmill. When in my sixteenth year and only having £8 a year, I was anxious for a situation with more money, but always made Mr. Walker’s my home when visiting Derbyshire. Coming to Yorkshire. At that time, many farm servants were hired at the hiring fairs which were held at various towns, Rotherham, Penistone, Bradfield, Hope., etc. It was very interesting to see the young men and women waiting to be hired. On May 13th, 1861, I formed one of that company and was hired at Hope Fair by Tommy Crawshaw of Park Farm, Deepcar, for £9 a year. In a few days after the engagement, I presented myself at Park Farm. The first Monday after my arrival there was Whit Monday which has always been a holiday. When I was told by Mr. Crawshaw to go and work in the garden and hearing the Band playing in Fox Bottom (Stocksbridge) I broke down and wept and could not eat any breakfast. Mr. Crawshaw’s Mother followed me into the garden with some oatcake and cheese and told me if I could not eat I could not work. I gave Mr. Crawshaw a month’s notice but he said I should have to stay a year as he had given me the “fastening penny” which was sometimes a shilling and sometimes more. On the morning when the month’s notice had expired I told Mr. Crawshaw I wanted my month’s wages and he told me I should not get it. I told him I should take him to the Court in Sheffield; he said the case would have to be tried in Barnsley. I went several times to ask for the money but have not got it yet. There lived at that time at Low Laith, two men both old enough to be my father, G.H. and E.D. These men got me to gamble with them at the game of “Odd Lad” a game in which it is very easy to cheat, so they got all my money and left me, a stranger in a strange land, without a penny. During the month’s notice, I went to see Mr. Joseph Crossland who lived at Morehall. He had three farms, Broomhead, Wood Farm and Morehall. He was brother-in-law to Mr. Walker, my late master, they having married two sisters. Mr. Crossland often visited at Leadmill so I knew him well. He took to me kindly and started me as one of his servants. I went to Morehall the morning I left Mr. Crawshaw. Mr. Crossland gave me a flask of home-brewed beer a large teacake and bacon, and directed me to a field behind Broomhead Hall, close to the moors to help in clearing away the twitch. I was very happy during the six months I was at Morehall and learnt to do more advanced farm work, also part of the time, I delivered mile daily in Sheffield, mostly at the Union Workhouse, Corporation Street. At the age of sixteen Mr. Crossland asked me if I could manage three horses on one machine in a fallow field. I told him I thought I could, and I did it on the Morehall farm. Sometimes, I worked on the Wood Farm, and, in the haychamber – there I wrote my first letter, which was to my Mother, who lived in Hathersage.there lived in the house at Morehall, the Horseman, the Cowman, and the writer, who was expected to take many parts. We three sat at a long table against the wall, near the door; three pots of home-brewed beer were placed on the table for us, varying in size according to our ages, also bread and a brown dish containing dripping. We were expected to help ourselves, which we did but got tired of the never-failing bread and dripping. We tried to bring about a change by eating up all the dripping, but to our disappointment there was a fresh supply next day. When living with Mr. Crossland, I exchanged my clothes box, which was a new one, for a double-barrelled pistol with Johnny Grant, the Horseman. There were a number of plum trees at Morehall and one Sunday afternoon some boys came from Deepcar to help themselves. They were caught and brought into the house, and Mr. Crossland said he would let them go if they would kneel down and ask his pardon, but I retired before the kneeling-down process began. Leaves Morehall for Townend. Having heard that Mr. Fox of Townend House wanted a boy about my age to live in the house I made application for the situation and had an interview with Mrs. Fox. Mr. Crossland gave me a character written on a scrap of paper which was not even in an envelope which said – “Joe was a good lad” – if it were possible now to choose between that scrap of paper and a £5 note, I would choose the scrap of paper. I came to Townend on December 2nd, 1861, and walked all the way from Hathersage. This walking seemed to make a good impression as young Mr. Fox came out of the room to see me and to congratulateme on having walked such a long way. My wages were £22 a year and one new suit of clothes and one long silk hat and a pair of white gloves, which I wore when riding by the side of the coachman when he was driving with the carriage and pair to Ebenezer Chapel on Sundays. Sometimes, I took the two maids in the Dog Cart to the same Chapel on Sunday nights. For several weeks I did not like the new situation and did not think I should stay. Mr. Fox was a very severe master and very hard to please. The coachman, George Ellis, had allowed one of the horses to run away with the Dog Cart. When the bill for damages came in he sent for the Coachman and discharged him at a minute’s notice, at the same time taking a kick at me and saying “Thou will be next”. My first work in the morning was to fetch the letter bag from the Post Office at Deepcar, kept by Thomas Turton. This was before 7 o’clock. Often when going up the field near to the house, Mr. Fox would be standing at the Kitchen door waiting for the bag. I had to deal with the letter bag later in the day. Letters from the Post Office and this letter bag, at that time, were taken to Sheffield by a man called Tom who had only one arm. I was often kept waiting at the works for the bag till it was time for me to be at Deepcar and had to run after the man sometimes into the Bitholmes before getting up to him. Another duty was to take dinner from Townend to the works for Mr. & Mrs. Fox. Sometimes, I went on the back of young Mr. Fox’s pony. At that time, what it now the Council Offices, was a stable in which I put the pony. On one occasion, I placed the basket containing the dinner, on top of the a wall inside the Council yard. An old man, called Chapell, who owned a donkey, lived near, and the donkey, evidently attracted by the dinner, came along and upset the basket and contents whilst I was putting the pony in the stable. The Horses from Townend were taken to be shod to the Blacksmith’s shop at Wharncliffe side, kept by Mr. Thomas Nichols; returning from there one dark November night on the back of the pony, and passing the rocks at the far end of the Bitholmes, suddenly the pony jumped on one side to allow a vehicle to pass which I had not seen, as at that time, it was not compulsory to have lights on vehicles. Mrs. Fox was very strict but very kind and took an interest in me. Apart from any actual work, she gaveme lessons in writing and for one lesson I wrote out the shortest psalm. She also provided me with books to read. One which I remember was “Old Humphrey’s Country Stories”. On wet Sunday nights, she would come to the Kitchen and give the maids and the boy a Scripture lesson. I remember one lesson about Noah. Before this time, Mrs. Fox had been a teacher in Ebenezer Sunday School. I look back to this time and to the interest, Mrs. Fox took in me, as the beginning of my desire for self-fulfilment. I joined Mr. Robertshaw’s Bible Class and in March 1864 (The Sunday before the Sheffield Flood) became a Sunday School Teacher and taught in the infant school with Mr. Hepworth. Jonathan and George Jubb were two of our scholars. I passed the London examination for Sunday School Teachers in 1875. The Mutual Improvement Society was a great institution and was a branch of what was known as the Yorkshire Mechanics Institute. I entered the Institute as a dull boy and became its secretary. It usually had two examinations, Higher and Lower. After several attempts I passed the Lower Exam. And two years later passed the Higher. When going to breakfast one morning and passing Mr. Robertshaw’s house, he came to the door with a document in his hand and said to me “They have made a D.D. of you”. The document contained the exam. results. Advanced classes in French etc., were taught by Miss Figg, afterwards Mrs. Brierley. Many boys, young me, and men no longer young, were attracted to the classes provided for self-improvement. The results were very great and far reaching, giving many young people a start in life which they would otherwise not have had. Mr. Robertshaw was the life and soul of the work; he had the task of bringing young men under his influence. His work was a very great asset to Stocksbridge and the result of his work is still with us. At the end of two years at Townend, which, on the whole had been a happy time, I told Mrs. Fox I would like to go the works and learn a trade. Mrs. Fox said they had been thinking about putting me in uniform and I was to become a footman to young Mr. Fox but she agreed for me to go to the works. My first job at the works was in the hot sheet mill, doing the work of a (Catcher) which was to stand behind the rolls with a pair of tongs and catch the out-coming piece of sheet steel and carry it down the mill. I did not remain at this work very long but went to work with Matthew Booth, a Mill Wright and after that to Thomas Herbert who had charge of the Steam Engines and heavy machinery. Here I was bound as an apprentice to engineering to serve till I was 22 years of age. At that time, there were only two others serving in that capacity. Nathaniel Crossland and John Whittaker. Before my apprenticeship had expired, I became a married man, my wages being twelve shillings a week and overtime. Meeting Mr. Fox one day in the yard, I ventured to ask him if he could advance my wages. His question was “How much hast thou”? I replied “Twelve shillings a week”. He said “I only had nine when I was an apprentice”. He told me to go and tell the cashier that I was to be paid fourteen shillings a week. Apprentices after this received 14 shillings a week in their last year. A few years after I was out of my time, Michael Cardens’ health failed and I was expected to carry on when he was absent from the works. The Engineering Department like other parts of the works, had increased very considerably. After several years of ill health, Michael Cardens passed away and I was appointed his successor. I had full charge of what was known as the Light Engineering Department. This gave opportunity for improvements and the introduction of new machinery. One day when Mr. Fox had been going the round of the works he sent for me into his office and told me to go into the Rail mill and see if I could not devise some method whereby there would be a reduction in the number of me employed in handling the hot rails and billets as they left the rolls, three of four me would pull the hot rail or billet to the hot saw to be cut into lengths. I at once devised a method which released two or three men. After being in charge of the Light Engineering Department, Thomas Herbert passed away. Then I was given full charge of all the engineering at the works. When my,position became more important I again ventured to ask Mr. Fox for an advance in wages – he held up his hand and said – “Leave that to me” – so the wages question after that was left to him and his successors. At the end of 45 years diligent service I expressed a wish to retire and left the works in 1907 with feelings of regret, both on my part and on the part of the man with whom I had been so long associated. I always had a desire to see foreign countries but had not the opportunity before retiring from business. So in March, 1907, I went to Palestine and Egypt, then the year later a trip round the world. Several times since then to Canada, also to France and Belgium, and then had my 81st Birthday on board the Montroyal on my way to Canada. Since my retirement, much of my time has been spent in public service and at the present time, 1927, I am still a Sunday School Teacher; a member of the West Riding County Council and the Stocksbridge U.D.C., Wortley Board of Guardians. An original member of the Old Age Pension Committee, Stocksbridge Education Sub-Committee, Bolsterstone, and Bradfield Education trusts and Sheffield Royal Institute for the Blind. In giving this record it has been a great surprise with what clearness and freshness the facts have come to my mind. My object in telling my little story is that possibly it may help and encourage others. J.S. May, 1927.
    4 points
  9. Just found this picture of the Albert Hall amongst my mother-in-laws old photos - it says it was taken just after the fire
    4 points
  10. Following Jean Cass's excellent history of the Rivelin Tunnel, published here in August 2010, hildweller posted a comment and a photo of the tunnel exit. His last two sentences referred to the tunnel’s entrance, somewhere in the wood behind the Ladybower Fisheries Office.He wrote “Has anyone ever seen this portal I wonder. I’m afraid exploring up there is beyond me nowadays.” Please see the attached photo, taken from the woods behind the Fisheries. I was surprised to find that the Rivelin junction is open to the elements, outside the Valve House. The flow from right to left is the gravity fed flow from Derwent to Bamford filters. The flow towards the bottom right of the photo is Sheffield’s supply, about to enter the Rivelin Tunnel.
    4 points
  11. I could never understand, in fact I still don’t, as to why the council allowed the destruction of all the old Victorian shops on Pinstone Street including the Cambridge Arcade, then add insult to injury allow the horrible buildings that were put up in their place. Thanks to picture Sheffield.
    4 points
  12. Hello All, I'm delighted to say that I have been shortlisted for European Heritage Storyteller of the Year for 'Drainspotting'. The link here is the just published submission which formed the final part of the process. There are now just 20 stories left in the contest (of which I am one) and the final 10 are announced later this month. Hopefully there will more updates to follow but thank you very much to all the people who contributed to this long running thread which was part of my story and supporting evidence https://www.europeanheritagedays.com/Story/cfbd0/Drainspotting-%40%40%40-A-European-Story%2c-Made-in-Sheffield^^^
    4 points
  13. Amazing picture in High Street 1966 of a Victorian sewer. This was found during work to construct the new Castle Square roundabout.
    4 points
  14. I have recently helped write and install a second information board on the opposite side of the bridge in conjunction with Decathlon, who have been very supportive and interested.
    4 points
  15. Picture 1 is the approach to the station taken in 1937. 2 is the top end from 1948 and picture 3. Picture 4 shows the turntable also 1948 By the way the white lines are crop marks for photo editing purposes.
    4 points
  16. The Porter Brook emerging briefly in the former Staples car park off Eyre Street. 1949 and 2019.
    4 points
  17. Weston bank. That's Wards Universtity bookshop ahead.
    4 points
  18. Here is one of my Grandfather's glass slides of High Street that looks to be taken from about the same place
    4 points
  19. Last year's thread and I rediscovered this 35mm slide which seems to fit appropriately into this one.Taken in June 1963 when rear loaders were favourite and steam locos much in evidence at Midland Station.
    4 points
  20. If you look at Victorian etchings or photos of the Cathedral you can see that the headstones seem to have been always laid flat, but the Victorians laid paths among them and nobody walked on the stones BUT I think it's a case of showing a total lack of respect for the people who's names are on the headstones, to use them as paving slabs is shameful. The finest churchyard I've ever been in is Greyfriars in Edinburgh.
    4 points
  21. A post-war vision of Sheffield, published by Sheffield City Council. Most likely still copyrighted, so reproduced for research and discussion purposes only. Interesting comparisons between what was proposed and what actually happened. Not reproduced in full, but some of those parts shown have previously been the subject of much discussion on this site.
    4 points
  22. Johnson Class 1P-D, then a Grimesthorpe based engine, poses for the camera, whilst on station pilot duties, at Midland Station in 1931. Built at Derby in May 1886, as Midland Railway No.1825, and withdrawn from service at Grimesthorpe, on 26/12/1931. Renumbered as No.1333, in 1907, as portrayed here. A tantalising glimpse of Granville Street, (highlighted), beyond the station perimeter as well. Was it still Granville Street in 1931? POSTSCRIPT: There is a story associated with this photograph that what is recorded here, is this locomotive's last scheduled day of working on 24/12/1931, but that story has never been verified.
    4 points
  23. Absolutely fascinated by these images and the differences and similarities. Here's an animation: https://i.imgur.com/O6hYAdp.gifv
    4 points
  24. Crookes, the tracks to the right go up Pickmere Road to the tram sheds. Also School Road to the right which was shown on destination blinds, a terminus for short runners.
    4 points
  25. I'm afraid that I disagree with that Dave, as my family and fore bears, like all those around us, shopped in the Rag & Tag, Castle Market, and Norfolk Market Hall, all their lives without dying of food poisoning or anything similar. We didn't battle for expensive parking places as we walked from Heeley to town, did our shopping and walked home again. In the old days there were no suburban supermarkets so we did much of our shopping at our local shops but always went to town on Saturdays and at holiday times besides works lunch times. I, personally always enjoyed shopping in town and, for that reason, I also never let my fingers do the walking as this is responsible for the demise of shops and the death of the city centres. The minute we have a power outage, everyone will suddenly find that they can't buy anything which doesn't sound good if we suffer a cyber attack. I prefer to buy things in shops, who pay their taxes and help to pay the cost of keeping everything running. Our present lifestyle is unsustainable and will change whether we like it or not. Yes, we have changed along with the town centres but we are going to have to change back again. It's laughable that we now have wider pavements than we ever had but hardly any pedestrians. Compare that with the throngs of pedestrians we saw in the old days. We are going to finish up with a city centre of fancy paving but no shops except cafes and coffee bars and good luck with the visible police presence. I hope to NOT live long enough to see the finished article
    3 points
  26. Here's a great video by a real train driver filmed by him, with explanations of the route taken this year. With unedited passage through tunnels and yes Totley Tunnel. The only time he stops the video is waiting time at stations. Things to watch for include the speed signs, especially into Sheffield. Plus how quickly the train accelerators. When he stops the train in a station, the driver has to know when to apply the brakes. There's nothing telling him now stop for the next station.
    3 points
  27. There has been an Assay Office in Sheffield since 1773, when local silversmiths, who resented the inconvenience of having to send their wares to London for hallmarking, joined with Birmingham petitioners to ask Parliament for their own Offices. Despite fierce opposition from the London Goldsmiths' Company, an Act of Parliament was passed, granting Sheffield the right to assay silver. Because the Select Committee which considered the petition had uncovered so many abuses by the existing Assay Offices, Parliament made sure that the new ones were more strictly controlled. The Act appointed thirty local men, including Thomas, the 3rd Earl of Effingham as 'Guardians of the Standard of Wrought Plate within the Town of Sheffield' to supervise the work of the Office. By restricting the number of Guardians who were silversmiths to fewer than ten, Parliament made sure that the Office was run for the benefit of the consumer rather than the manufacturer. The day to day running of the Office was entrusted to an Assay Master who had to take his oath before the Master of the Royal Mint and enter into a Bond for £500. The Office was to be non-profit making, and its running costs were to be met by the hallmarking charges paid by the manufacturers. More than two hundred years later, the Office is still funded in exactly the same way. Originally, Sheffield had the right to mark all silver goods produced within a twenty mile radius of Sheffield. After the second Sheffield Act of 1784, the office also had the right to keep a Register of all makers' marks on plated silver wares made within one hundred miles radius - which of course included Birmingham. From 1836 this Register unfortunately fell into disuse, but before then Sheffield and Birmingham frequently quarrelled over Sheffield's monopoly, and Sheffield occasionally threatened to prosecute Birmingham makers for using unregistered marks. Possibly this explains why more Birmingham platers than Sheffield registered their marks. The 1773 Act empowered Sheffield to use a Crown for its town mark. The story goes that this was because the Birmingham and Sheffield petitioners for the Act met at the 'Crown and Anchor', an inn situated off The Strand in London, and that each town adopted one of these signs as its mark. Certainly the inn existed - but whether there is any truth in the story is unknown. After 1903, when Sheffield was finally allowed to assay and mark gold as well as silver (the result of a clause in the Sheffield Corporation Act), Sheffield was unique in having two town marks - the Crown for silver and the Yorkshire rose for gold. For the first eleven years the Office struggled to survive, borrowing heavily from local silversmiths. By using mass-production methods for stamping out thin silver, Sheffield made very light wares which competed strongly with heavier London-made goods. Assaying, however, was charged for by weight. Over 100 knife handles could be marked for only 5p - a price which did not reflect the time and effort involved. The only way to make ends meet was to increase charges. The Act of 1784 charged for small articles by count instead of weight. As a result, the Office's fortunes revived. The first Assay Office was a rented house on Norfolk Street and the first Assay Master a Londoner, Daniel Bradbury. The Office only opened on Mondays and Thursdays, though Mr. Bradbury was allowed to open on a third day for private assays. In 1774 the Office moved to a court off Norfolk Street "lately occupied by Thomas Boulsover" - the inventor of Old Sheffield Plate. By 1795 the Office had moved again, this time to a brand new building on Fargate. In the nineteenth century, Sheffield became a major manufacturing centre with an international reputation for its silver and cutlery. Production continued to grow rapidly and it became obvious that the Office could no longer cope unless its opening hours increased. When, in 1880, the Fargate premises were needed for road-widening, the Guardians acquired a new site in Leopold Street and remained there until 1958. By this time, however, the demand for silver goods had fallen dramatically and the building was much too large. Before the War 1,250,000 ounces of silver passed through the Office each year. By 1958 this had fallen to 300,000 ounces. Many large local firms closed and it seemed as though the only people still making silverwares were skilled craft-workers. The Office moved again, this time to a much smaller building in Portobello Street. After the Hallmarking Act was passed in 1973, the nature of the work submitted to the Assay Office changed. No longer were the main customers the traditional Sheffield silversmiths producing large pieces of hollow-ware. Goods from all over the United Kingdom and abroad came in to be assayed, and foreign gold (especially 9ct gold chains) became very important. The extra workload involved by this increase in smaller articles necessitated re-development - initially within the existing building, to streamline the laboratories and make more marking space. In 1973, Jack Cheetham made some cufflinks in which the hallmark was a necessary and important part of the decoration; Jack Spencer adapted this idea and used the largest size of hallmark as decoration on a range of gold and silver jewellery. A cheaper alternative then appeared, in which the mark was placed vertically down a rectangular block to make 'dog-tag' pendants, and these, especially when they incorporated the Special Mark to celebrate the Queen's Silver Jubilee, became phenomenally successful. The income from this extra work was used in alterations to make the Goldsmiths' Wing to create more marking space, and the foundation stone was laid by Ian Threlfall, Prime Warden of the Goldsmiths' Company, in October 1978. More space for marking was created by renting office space elsewhere in the town and converting the existing offices into marking rooms. Meanwhile, the Office bought the former 'Willow Tree' public house next door and fitted it out for offices and marking. By now the British Hallmarking Council was pressing for an expansion of hallmarking facilities in Britain, so the Office bought the Charleston Works on Orange Street adjacent to the 'Willow Tree' to give better access to customers and more off-street parking, and to allow room for more building. In March 1983 Sir Frederick Dainton, then Prime Warden of the Goldsmiths' Company, laid the foundation stone of the Guardians' Hall. The new building was completed in 1985 and officially opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in December 1986. It provided extra space for offices, laboratories, staff facilities, Board Room and Library. The Hallmarking Act of 1973 removed many restrictions on marking and consolidated many earlier Acts. It was based on the Trade Descriptions Act and made it an offence to sell almost anything as gold, silver or platinum unless first assayed and marked. For the first time, all the Offices adopted the same date-letter and alphabet. After 200 years, Sheffield lost its Crown mark for silver and used the Yorkshire Rose on both gold and silver. Platinum was not assayed in Sheffield until June 1975, mainly because of the cost of the equipment needed, but testing and marking were finally introduced to meet local customers' demands. The Office has continued to adapt to customers' needs. Recent internal alterations have created more laboratory space and streamlined the hallmarking process. In 1997 laser marking was introduced for hollow articles such as necklaces, watch-cases and bangles, which would have been damaged by traditional methods. Over a quarter of a million of such items were marked in 1999. Other services, such as nickel-free testing for jewellery and mercury-screening for occupational exposure, complement traditional assaying and hallmarking. January 1999 saw the introduction of additional (lower) standards for gold, silver and platinum to enable free competition within the European Community. For the first time the date-letter became voluntary rather than compulsory, and the sterling lion mark and crown gold mark also became optional. Now all goods are marked with their standard of fineness in parts per thousand, and it is no longer possible to distinguish between British and foreign-made articles. The effect on British manufacturing remains to be seen. However, an additional special mark for the millennium was also introduced, to be used on any item made between January 1999 and December 2000, at the manufacturer's request. This captured the imagination of the public, and increased the sale of precious metal wares. In the 21st century the workload has continued to grow. 2001 was the busiest year ever in the Office's long history. Over 12.9 million articles were assayed and marked in Sheffield. More staff were taken on, and the building extended yet again, this time to create a new top floor for Guardians' Hall, providing comfortable staff accommodation, whilst the old staff room was converted to make more room for marking. The extension was opened on April 11th 2002 by HRH the Duke of Kent, KG, the third Royal visitor to the Office in 30 years. Another special mark, to commemorate H.M Queen Elizabeth II's Golden Jubilee, was used for one year only in 2002. Initially, any profits made by the Office had to be used solely for prosecuting those who broke the law on hallmarking. However, by the beginning of the twentieth century when the local silver industry was at its height, the Office was making a large profit. As a result, a new Act was granted in 1906, permitting some of the surplus to be spent on providing a collection of books or objects relating to the silver and gold industry, to promoting technical education in Sheffield especially for the silver and gold industry and to charitable donations. Since then, the Office has built up a large specialised library and a collection of silver, mainly made in Sheffield. In addition, the Office has sponsored various competitions to encourage local craftsmen, and, most recently, financed a fully equipped workshop unit at Persistence Works for metalwork and jewellery graduates starting out in business. In addition, the Office is a corporate member of the Millennium Galleries, where the splendid Millennium Punch Bowl is on display. This ongoing commission was the result of collaboration between four local designers; Alex Brogden, Chris Knight, Brett Payne and Keith Tyssen. A new cup is to be added each year, commissioned by the Assay Office from a modern designer.
    3 points
  28. The answer can be found on this link: https://twitter.com/NancyFielder/status/1350788532835667972
    3 points
  29. Hi all. I have written a biographical piece on my great-great grandfather, PC Thomas Clifford of Derbyshire Constabulary, who was posted to the area of Sheffield's border with Derbyshire in the early 1880s. This has now been published online, as a freely downloadable pdf document, by Derbyshire Family History Society (DFHS). The piece is 82 pages with as many period images, and takes about two hours to read. Many members of the community which PC Clifford patrolled were culters, and others wandered down from the city to drink in the pubs over the border. I therefore devote a significant amount of space to them. In case anyone has any use for links to the pdf, such as adding to a web page or sharing in other ways: The page where DFHS have placed the link to open the pdf - https://www.dfhs.org.uk/member_downloads.php?catid=6 Direct link for the pdf itself - https://www.dfhs.org.uk/filestore/PC_Thomas_Clifford_1880-85_110.pdf To navigate from the DFHS homepage, select 'Data & Downloads', then 'Downloads Area', and the link 'PC Clifford' appears under 'File categories (Public)'; this opens the page on which the link to the pdf appears I lived in Brimington on the north edge of Chesterfield in the mid-1990s when I worked in Sheffield, just off Ecclesall Road. Best wishes, John Clifford
    3 points
  30. The view over the wall is that of the GPO building on Flat Street so the street where the cars are parked must be Milk Street (If I've remembered the name correctly). It was at the back of the plot of land where the Odeon was built running from Norfolk Street. Strangely enough, I can't remember the business premises with the name Horsefield.
    3 points
  31. Some interesting reading here and I wasn’t aware that the two Cinecenta screens were now part of the Odeon Luxe multi-screens on Arundel Gate, but I suppose they are actually in the basement!?! 😆 http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/27483
    3 points
  32. I found this image a few days ago. It's not very clear as it's just from an old thumbnail, but it shows the war memorial at Wadsley Bridge with Sharpe's shop immediately behind it . Would this be the opening ceremony maybe? It looks very well attended!
    3 points
  33. I would bet that everyone on here would agree with you, to me it;s as bad as chucking a brick through a window, it's a crime and should be dealt with as such.
    3 points
  34. The map also shows several other pubs: Norfolk Arms - bottom of Norfolk Street Black Swan - corner of Flat Street and Little Pond Street Tankard Inn - Little Pond Street Barrell - Little Pond Street Prince of Wales - corner of Sycamore Street and Flat Street.
    3 points
  35. Skippers delicious Sardines.
    3 points
  36. The St Vincent's area is where the crofts were sited, what i find sad about any old photos like this one is the thought that even though they look happy their lives were a day to day battle and worse of all they are all dead. The photo shows Queen Street leading to Scotland Street.
    3 points
  37. Covers more than just Penistone. Includes: Stocksbridge, Langsett, Thurgoland, Midhope, etc. Includes a photo gallery. https://penistonearchive.co.uk/
    3 points
  38. Some recent finds A lone 16 ton mineral wagon left on bay line!
    3 points
  39. I've got several locations with pictures, but never seen an exposure as big as this one. 4 lines into 2? Any other geeks might want to keep an eye out down there, as they are redeveloping it, so more might be uncovered. Exchange Place into Blonk Street
    3 points
  40. Well, that was a ride out! Four hours driving to Lowestoft to see 513 in the flesh. I saw her at Beamish over 20 years ago and after our recent trips to Crich, thought we could have a ride to Lowestoft today to see the other surviving Roberts Car. Didnt look that far on the map! Carlton Colville museum is a lovely place, compact, but with a number of things to see, just enough for an afternoon out....if you’re in the area, that is, I’m not sure I’d do the drive down there again just for the day! Compared to the almost pristine condition of 510, 513 seems to have had a much harder life, is now looking a little tired and looks to need a bit of tlc. Apparently still owned by Beamish, given that they are building a 1950’s area at their site in the North East at the moment, I wonder if 513 will be heading north some time soon? Have attached some pictures of 513 and one of 510 for comparison.
    3 points
  41. Made in Great Britain, BBC2, Series exploring how the craft and manufacturing skills have shaped Great Britain Friday 26th October, 2100 hrs. run time, 59 minutes . Episode 1 https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bpz4ks The makers experience Sheffield's transformation into an industrial powerhouse known as 'Steel City', famous throughout the world for making high quality steel and cutlery. In this episode, four craft-makers experience Sheffield's rapid transformation from a rural market town to an industrial powerhouse that built modern Britain known as 'Steel City'. Sheffield became famous throughout the world for making high quality steel blades and cutlery. Steph McGovern takes them through the ages and they are guided by local Sheffield cutler Corin Mellor. Starting in the 18th century, they are tasked with hand forging a scythe at Abbeydale Works. This farming tool found recent fame when used by a shirtless Poldark, but the makers discover it was one of Sheffield's biggest exports that launched Britain's steel industry. The process proves to be a hugely physical challenge. Next, they step into the heart of a Victorian production line to make cutlery stamped with the fashionable King's Pattern. Steph learns that the extravagant Victorian middle class had a different piece of cutlery for every type of food. They prepare the knives, forks and spoons ready for electroplating - 'blinging' up the cutlery by covering it in silver. The biggest innovations are yet to come. Travelling forward to the start of the 20th century, the makers learn that stainless steel was discovered in Sheffield, bringing affordable cutlery to the masses. They experience Sheffield's transformation into a war machine to defend Britain - making WWII Commando Knives using a heavy duty drop stamp. Now in the 21st century, Corin Mellor takes the makers to his state-of-the-art factory, David Mellor Design. Here, they make high-end stainless steel forks from one of factory's bestselling ranges. With the city's focus on quality rather than quantity, the craft-makers discover that Sheffield's historic cutlery industry is still thriving.
    3 points
  42. For your information the letters on the bridge BB & JH refer to Benjamin Blonk and John Huntsman. Blonk Street was so called because when it was made the "tilt" shown on the map on the river side of Blonk St.was "The Wicker ***" belonging to the Blonk Family. On the other side of Blonk St. was "The Wicker Wheel" also belonging to the Blonk Family. You will also see a third grinding shop belonging to the Blonks at the end of the dam to the right of "Blonk Island". Later on John Huntsman had a Huntsman Melting Furnace at the end of the Wicker Tilt building. If you look through the large window nearest to Blonk Bridge you will see the chimney of the Huntsman furnace preserved as a monument. Remember the old Sheffield saying "Down T'Wicker were t'water goes o'er t'weir" the weir on the upstream side of Ladys Bridge diverted water to the Wicker Tilt and Wicker Wheel. I learnt all about this by carrying out research for descendants of this branch of the Blonk family who live in Australia. My Blonk family come from a later branch of the Blonk family
    3 points
  43. https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/ziongraveyardattercliffe?utm_id=107&utm_term=GNBDrjwRP I think it is criminal that Mary Ann Rawson's grave could end up under a carpark. It is pretty bad that so much of the history of Attercliffe is crumbling and often unknown, but Mary Ann Rawson as a woman abolitionist is of international importance. 2018 is also the centenary of women getting the vote in the UK and Heritage Open Days are concentrating on the remarkable women in Sheffield. Would be great if we had ownership of the graveyard by then and could go on to promote this remarkable woman and of course the history of Attercliffe.
    3 points
  44. It is not really surprising that steam propelled road vehicles remained in use for certain applications for as long as they did. Steam propelled locomotives remained in use on our industrial railway network until well into the 1970's, and arguably for a decade after their withdrawal from service by British Railways in 1968. For certain specific applications, steam propulsion remained well suited to the those tasks for which it had originally been acquired, and for as long as operating costs remained below those of any replacement costs, then 'if it's not broken, why fix it?' Their withdrawal probably came about when those financial considerations could longer be balanced. Brown Baileys' fleet of Sentinel Steam Lorries were probably ideally suited for the carriage of heavy castings and whilst not 'fleet of foot', they probably remained ideal for internal transport applications within a large steel works, spread over many acres, and also for short haul distribution, in and around the Brightside Area. As for the Sentinel Steam Lorry portrayed here. I think that it is most likely a 'Standard' Type, six-ton flat bodied unit, with two-cylinder, double-acting engine and vertical boiler. A total of 3,746 were built, between 1905 and 1923, when the 'Super Sentinel' type was introduced. They were generally supplied with a very basic, windowless cab. The first units were built at Glasgow, until production was switched to Shrewsbury in 1915. Post-script: Got some images of Sid Harrison's Scammell Fleet somewhere. Will try to did them out. If I remember rightly, he also had a couple of industrial steam locomotives stored in his yard once upon a time. I remember passing these red liveried lorries regularly when they were labouring up the long hill on the M1 south-bound, just before you came to Tibshelf Services.
    3 points
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