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    Sheffield History

    Sheffield History Team


    • Points

      11

    • Content Count

      6,948


  2. paulhib48

    paulhib48

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      6

    • Content Count

      48


  3. DaveJC

    DaveJC

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      6

    • Content Count

      39


  4. makapaka

    makapaka

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      5

    • Content Count

      72


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 17/01/21 in Posts

  1. The time captured in one small paragraph, my Dad took me into the fish market on Saturday Afternoon for a plate of cockles or mussels, the place was heaving so I had to hold his hand all the time we were in there otherwise I could be swept along with the crowd, it was the only place I’ve ever seen a deer hung up ready to be butchered. All gone, Sheffield is a shadow of what it use to be, the Market is a poor substitute for what we lost. I hate the supermarkets, I would much rather see the small independent shops, grocers, butchers, green grocers, clothes shops, shoe shops, toy shops but their
    2 points
  2. I started work in 1955 at the Wicker Goods Station, Saville Street and can confirm that wagons such as these were still in very common use in the 50's. I also recall Bogies amongst them too - some I think were used by National Benzole petrol & oil company who were based at Lumley Street.
    2 points
  3. Well DaveJC , unfortunately the 48 is the giveaway and I’m 73 this year. Ive also looked at some of the pictures on the 50s thread and can well remember the bombed out buildings in the process of being rebuilt. C&A Modes always sticks in my mind as the tram stop to Firth Park was outside and is a reminder of trips from Totley to visit my grandparents. There were temporary buildings at the bottom of the Moor where it had been flattened. I watched it all being rebuilt but didn’t warm to a single redevelopment, Those blackened substantial buildings that remained and were th
    2 points
  4. This must be after the war, the film Two Men and a Girl in the last photo wasn't released until 1947. Nigel L
    2 points
  5. The answer can be found on this link: https://twitter.com/NancyFielder/status/1350788532835667972
    2 points
  6. Too many really Just part of the journey in the decline of the Sheffield we’d all known and loved
    2 points
  7. The adjacent block was Dyson House, which was owned by the Poly.
    2 points
  8. I know this is from a few months ago but I've only just come across it. I worked at Ralstons for a couple of years in the early 70s. Hard, mucky work but have some good memories
    1 point
  9. A walk down town on a Saturday morning was a snapshot of life in its entirety. People everywhere. And you always bumped into someone you knew! Not like now ! Both my mum and dad worked on Saturday mornings so it was up to me to do a regular trip round the various bills to be paid......the estate agent in Norfolk Row for the rent, Burnett and Hallamshire in Change Alley to pay the coal bill, the YEB in Commercial Street and so on. Dodging the crowds, hearing the hawkers, the whine of the trams....absolute joy! Not so much fun when coal was in short supply, though. The wheelbarrow trip to
    1 point
  10. I've never been in so don't know whether the interior is (or has been) that austere, but the patterning of the glass that the bloke is peering over appears a close match to that at the Rivelin, Under Tofts.
    1 point
  11. Tinsley Park Cemetery. Twin spires at entrance, with stone cross at top of central drive and buildings in distance match Group huddled round grave = red arrow Jimmy by the skip with building in background = blue arrow Does that look right to anyone else?
    1 point
  12. There has been an Assay Office in Sheffield since 1773, when local silversmiths, who resented the inconvenience of having to send their wares to London for hallmarking, joined with Birmingham petitioners to ask Parliament for their own Offices. Despite fierce opposition from the London Goldsmiths' Company, an Act of Parliament was passed, granting Sheffield the right to assay silver. Because the Select Committee which considered the petition had uncovered so many abuses by the existing Assay Offices, Parliament made sure that the new ones were more strictly controlled. The Act appointed t
    1 point
  13. Travel back in time to happier times, for a happy sunny walk from Park Square roundabout to Pond Street bus station!
    1 point
  14. It was a beerhouse (on licensed) at the time of the auction referenced and until it's demise. I can't say definitively what happened to the licence at present (it falls within ongoing research), but can suggest a probable chain of events. The long term licensee left in 1880 and is known to have run other premises after that date. It is likely that he transfered out close to the time the property came up for let in the middle of the year, however, by September, when fixtures and fittings were advertised for sale, he was named as seller. The sale in itself doesn't necesarily indicate closure (i
    1 point
  15. Great views from Smithcroft Wood / Shirecliffe Allotments. Brought back memories of the later 40's when the "White Bridge" was a popular vantage point to see the steam trains slogging up to Penistone, and to get a free long distance view of the Speedway on match nights! A further frame to the right would have revealed another popular spectator venue
    1 point
  16. https://www.picturesheffield.com/search&St_Nathanael_Church St. Nathanael's Church, Roebuck Road, Upperthorpe
    1 point
  17. As a sufferer of Acrophobia I can’t even imagine living in the business end of a high rise building. It’s nothing to do with council accommodation, I would feel just the same in a multi million pound penthouse, remember Richard Gere in Pretty Woman with Julia Roberts all but hanging over his penthouse balcony and him attempting to melt into wall farest from it, well other than for the Julia Roberts deficiency, that was me to a tee. I’ve often wondered if folk with my fears are identified by the council prior to being housed in such buildings, in the private housing market it’s easy, don’t
    1 point
  18. Answer in this thread, which surely must be connected? Huge coincidence if not?
    1 point
  19. Thanks. I guess I am just wondering if the owners are happy for people wandering around its grounds?
    1 point
  20. https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.4069768,-1.4326797,3a,75y,126.11h,84.44t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s-9a238ii3X8nlVpeUpd94A!2e0!7i16384!8i8192!5m1!1e1 I don't know the place, but the above link will take you to Google maps and seems to show that the graveyard is unmolested.
    1 point
  21. I just wonder what the shelf life of these buildings will turn out to be, I was the landlord’s representative in respect of Fargate Court back in the 1970’s. This was built circa 1960 and was in a terrible state less than 20 years into it’s life, basements constantly flooded, cracks had started to appear in it’s fabric, all windows were single glazed in metal frames, I assume that at least these have been upgraded. I have no idea of your age paulhib48, but hazard a guess that you will outlive many of these buildings.
    1 point
  22. Yes that’s where it was. Like it was never there!
    1 point
  23. Thankyou History Team, what BRILLIANT photos, they really capture the feeling of the era. Regards Heartshome
    1 point
  24. FBT was based on Carlisle St. East AND Saville Street (Jncs Windsor St to Princess St) I don't recognise the building, but there WAS a similar building just on Harleston St, (?) where shear bl**es were made (Can't say that can we Neal?) Also look for bessemer house just townside of Harleston St, I'm sure that was FBTs too. I left in 1981.
    1 point
  25. Wow thank you so much for these - they've brought back so many memories The Dog And Partridge!! Forgot all about that!
    1 point
  26. Yes it’s a real shame. The number of pubs alone that have gone is so sad - Even relatively recently there was still half a dozen or more open - but now (pandemic aside) there’s next to nothing. Would love to have gone there when everything was open but before my time really. It’s still a really interesting place to walk round though.
    1 point
  27. Had a walk in attercliffe earlier and took these photos with comparisons
    1 point
  28. This amateur film gives a revealing picture into top flight football in England, the old First Division, in the mid-1960s. The film shows action from Sheffield Wednesday playing at home at Hillsborough Stadium to Arsenal, possibly the match in March 1964: the Scottish centre half Ian Ure looks to be playing for Arsenal. The other two games have quite small crowds, so are probably both reserve team fixtures, possibly against Manchester United and Blackpool. These films were taken by keen Sheffield Wednesday supporter Harry Wilson of Barnsley, who also filmed around the same time the w
    1 point
  29. It's not so much one shop but it's the old rag and tag market going round it with my mum on Saturday afternoon. Loved that place when you were young it was magical.
    1 point
  30. Thanks for a great photo. Great to see it whilst it still looked like the Sheffield I loved, nice and tidy with the markets and proper roads & open spaces & car parks. I can't bear to see it with all the high rise buildings blocking out all the light and nothing but hotels and apartments. Looks more and more like America and very little that's nice, ever came from that place.
    1 point
  31. Extremely hard one to choose. Loved Sheaf and Castle Market. But one place stands to mind is a second hand shop on Infirmary Road which I loved going to.
    1 point
  32. Old Maps did reply! They asked for the postcode! I gave them plenty of details when I first sent the request. It doesn't take to much effort to find Sheffield and then select the 1967 large scale map to soon see the blank sections! And it's the case that's it's not loading in, because you can see the watermarking of "old maps" on the white sections.
    1 point
  33. Going to cheat and have 2. Central Library - went every few weeks on a midweek evening with my parents and was left to wander round by myself. The marble and high ceilings always fascinated me and it had a particular smell and atmosphere about it. Spent many a happy hour looking at the pictures in the railway books. Sheaf Market - Was taken in there from about 5 years of age (probably earlier but can't remember it). The bustle and range of shops made an impression on me. In the centre by the steps were 2 static childrens 'rides' one of which was a lifeboat that if you put a coin in w
    1 point
  34. For absolutely no reason other than I was looking something up in it, I decided to scan the pub pages from the directory and upload them. Co-vid times of boredom maybe??!!??
    1 point
  35. Wow! That's got to be a now missing section of Bard Street, looking down over the top of High Street Lane. They'd be stood on a path in a bit of parkland today (or perhaps have long since slid down into the road depending on recent weather).
    1 point
  36. Must say in my life time it's always looked much the same ,from the exterior that is. Much demolition/dismantling was done in the past with materials being reused for new construction in the area.
    1 point
  37. I recall Manor Lodge, when there was far more of it standing, the council have a curious habit of deciding to preserve something when there’s little left of it. I further recall it having a resident couple who charged folk to show them around the remains, whilst telling fanciful tales of Mary, Queen of Scots.
    1 point
  38. I at first thought of two that have already been mentioned the Norfolk Market Hall and the Fish Market but I finally decided on my fathers and later my favourite pub the Adelphi.
    1 point
  39. I stand corrected, my spelling skills are nothing compared to those of my dancing. 😜
    1 point
  40. Andrew's was, perhaps, the only place in our City where one could buy many of the books used at school. Yes, Lyn, another wonder of our childhood which provided us withe means to do things without the "benefit" of electronics and technology. The Methodist Bookshop was another place where "bookworms" could indulge themselves before going into Cann's.
    1 point
  41. In 1993 I was on holiday in the Isle of Man, and visited Murray’s Motorcycle Museum. One of the exhibits caught my attention – it was a framed AutoCycle Union Certificate of Performance for the Wilkin motorcycle which I noted had been made in Sheffield at Onslow Road, a couple of roads away from where I grew up. I took a poor photograph of the certificate. In 2005 Peter Murray announced that the museum was closing and asked for people to register their interest in buying the exhibits. I asked to buy the ACU certificate, but never heard anything. I presume there was insufficient interest in
    1 point
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