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Showing content with the highest reputation since 29/11/19 in Posts

  1. 1 point
    And again Sunday April 19th 2020 --------- http://www.mikehigginbottominterestingtimes.co.uk/?p=6022
  2. 1 point
    Childrens Homes Register, Fir Vale 27 Oct 1894 - 8 Nov 1902 Children's Homes at Sheffield Union Workhouse - the http://www.sheffieldindexers.com/ have started transcribing the admission registers for these homes. You can find them under the school records part of the site. It is easier to put *Fir Vale* in the District box and it will bring up an alphabetical list of those they have transcribed. The registers in their original form are very difficult to read and are kept at Sheffield Archives, so it has been a difficult job for the transcribers who have worked so hard on them. A big thank you to the transcribers. The Hospital Charity shop has a book on sale about the Scattered Homes. The shop is based just inside the Huntsman Entrance at the Northern General Hospital.
  3. 1 point
    The current building seems to have been built in 1880 by the Smith Bros, ivory dealers, and from the outset was called the Albert Works. The Smiths originally had the ground floor and rented the rest out to the Brook Brothers who were silver platers. The Smith Brothers partnership had been dissolved in 1864 (Thomas and Ann, his sister in law, Ivory, Pearl and Tortoise-shell Cutters and Dealers based at the Washington Works). The Smith Brothers ivory dealing business continued at the Washington Works until late 1880 when they moved into their newly built premises on Cambridge Street. Just over a year later it suffered from a fire, The Independent referred to the premises as the Albert Works while mysteriously the Telegraph called them the Helmet Works. So was the inscribed keystone re-used from the building that was on the plot previously - Edward Linley, Sheep Shear Manufacturer? See the 1884 newspaper article below. John Linley, Master Cutler in 1797 was a scissorsmith based at Spring Street, so possibly can be eliminated. An advert for the sale of Linley's premises in 1857. It appears that the Smith Brothers of Washington Works bought the premises, as in April 1859 they advertised that "TO LET and may be entered upon on and after the 26th day of April next, the PREMISES situated on Coalpit-lane now in the occupation of Mr Edward Linley, Sheep Shear Manufacturer - For further Particulars inquire of SMITH BROTHERS, Washington Works" : A letter possibly written by William Topham, who made the sketches of old Coal Pit Lane: Edward Linley died aged 65 at St Mary's Road on 2nd December 1879. The Linley family were at Coalpit Lane in 1841:
  4. 1 point
    Woodside from the 1971 AA Guide to Great Britain. The photo must be from either Park Hill or Hyde Park flats.
  5. 1 point
    I was on Canning Street yesterday, first time for around 2 years or more and I was pleasantly surprised to see the old Victorian buildings that still remain have had a spruce up and they look ok. On returning home I tried to find out just what was the name of this short street before it acquired its present name, it only ran from Division Street to Wellington Street so after looking at a 1832 map by J. Tayler Land & Mineral Surveyor, I can find Canning Street but it doesn't seem to have a name, so was it known by a local name before its present one or did it have a recognised name? The street does have a fine set of large stone cobbles, that's if you call them cobbles because they are large, I'm surprised they've survived. I was looking for the home of Mr Oliver Cromwell Turner (seems his father had respect for the man ) who lived here in 1862, he was a Rope & Twine manufacturer , in 1856 he was at 65 Division Street, this address may have been his works or his home, I cant say which. If anyone has any info on Oliver and the original name of Canning Street it would be a great help.
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