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    Sheffield History

    Sheffield History Team


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      6,943


  2. paulhib48

    paulhib48

    Sheffield History Member


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      9

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      47


  3. DaveJC

    DaveJC

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      9

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      33


  4. Edmund

    Edmund

    Sheffield History Member


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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 20/12/20 in Posts

  1. Well DaveJC , unfortunately the 48 is the giveaway and I’m 73 this year. Ive also looked at some of the pictures on the 50s thread and can well remember the bombed out buildings in the process of being rebuilt. C&A Modes always sticks in my mind as the tram stop to Firth Park was outside and is a reminder of trips from Totley to visit my grandparents. There were temporary buildings at the bottom of the Moor where it had been flattened. I watched it all being rebuilt but didn’t warm to a single redevelopment, Those blackened substantial buildings that remained and were th
    2 points
  2. This must be after the war, the film Two Men and a Girl in the last photo wasn't released until 1947. Nigel L
    2 points
  3. The answer can be found on this link: https://twitter.com/NancyFielder/status/1350788532835667972
    2 points
  4. Too many really Just part of the journey in the decline of the Sheffield we’d all known and loved
    2 points
  5. The adjacent block was Dyson House, which was owned by the Poly.
    2 points
  6. Wow! That's got to be a now missing section of Bard Street, looking down over the top of High Street Lane. They'd be stood on a path in a bit of parkland today (or perhaps have long since slid down into the road depending on recent weather).
    2 points
  7. Seen them at work today bringing it down. Another one bites the dust.
    2 points
  8. The church with the question mark is St. Andrew's, on St. Andrew's Road, now demolished, used to go to Cubs there in the '60's. Nigel L
    2 points
  9. The European cup, once lost, wss subsequently handed in at West Bar Police Station http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/8709846.stm It was the most prized piece of silverware in European club football - but one night in a pub in the West Midlands, it went missing. Twenty-eight years later the story of how two teams of police officers played to win the European Cup can finally be told. Very few people knew about the disappearance and subsequent recovery of this famous piece of football silverware in Sheffield. A secret kept for the last 28 years. In May, 1982, Aston Vi
    2 points
  10. https://www.picturesheffield.com/search&St_Nathanael_Church St. Nathanael's Church, Roebuck Road, Upperthorpe
    1 point
  11. Yes, Looking across High Street towards Change Alley !
    1 point
  12. Answer in this thread, which surely must be connected? Huge coincidence if not?
    1 point
  13. Beat me to it! Poundland now and A Library iirc
    1 point
  14. It definitely was. Did my YTS there in 1987 and remember the bell in the lobby area...
    1 point
  15. They appeared to have a very succesful fire engine breeding programme running on that patch of ground a few years ago.
    1 point
  16. I only have a very vague recollection of those buildings being up. The building next door (on the left in pic) is now flats and a very good curry house underneath, Seven Spices balti.
    1 point
  17. Yes, It is the same street but The door to Donna Hartley's fitness club was Just round the corner (opposite Dixons shop) between the top view and The Moor. It had no back door other than a fire escape because it wasn't at ground level. Donna Hartley took over the Gym which was previously known as The Gateway to Health and I used to train there in the 60's
    1 point
  18. I would say the shots were almost certainly taken from above the Ski Village site (around the Parkwood Springs viewing platform, Mountain Bike track area).
    1 point
  19. Change Alley does not appear on the 1736 Gosling map. Leonard Webster (Town Trustee 1744-73 and landlord of Kings Head) cut up the bowling green of the Kings Head for building plots, and made the throroughfare called Change Alley. That name is used to describe a way into the yard of a large inn. Although Jewish travellers and journeymen visited Sheffield from the 1650s to buy silverware and cutlery, it was not until 1786 that there is evidence that Jews lived in the town. Isaac and Philip Bright from Biarritz (1786). Jacob Gehrwin (1787) and Abraham Gershon (1797) were the first to live
    1 point
  20. I’d sort of worked out it must be between very late 60s and late 70s and Edmunds photos verify that. I notice on the last pic that the building was Seashells cafe at the time
    1 point
  21. I guess back in in 80s/90s I had a very interesting conversation with the old fella who ran what I think would be called a ‘Little Mesters’ workshop directly behind Morton’s (though I think unconnected ) where the flats complex now is. He was showing me some ‘serious’ and very expensive (non-Rambo!) hunting/survival knives which he was making and selling to selected customers only. He was situated on a narrow lane, first right down the lane in the photo, now blocked with a lamp standard and a grit bin. He said that a car load of ordinary looking guys dressed in jeans etc, had some months b
    1 point
  22. Yes. Remember the Slammer in the 70s . I had friends who worked at the Town Hall and it was considered a cool, trendy place to dine Attercliffe style. Very basic menu and limited choice served in large white bowls, I think. It was very unlike the Vesta Beef Curry I’d been buying as a curry connoisseur a few weeks previously.
    1 point
  23. I managed to sneak onto the station in the late 1970 via the cattle dock bay and used the white steps to get onto the platform. We had to sneak pass the signal box when the guy wasn't looking. It was bit more intact at that point too. It always fascinated me even to this day. I suppose it was due to the fact that it was very different to Midland Station. Being raised above ground and having the electric overhead wires running through it. The style of the buildings was different to the Midland and for someone interested in train spotting there was the possibility of seeing locos that didn't go
    1 point
  24. Well north west, but definitely towards Manchester.
    1 point
  25. ROLL OF HONOUR CIVILIAN WAR DEAD SHEFFIELD 1939-1945 The list below details the Surname-First Name- Age - Date of Death or Injury -Place of Death or Injury Abbey Ada 77 yrs 12 Dec 1940 422 Springvale Road Abbott Thomas 40 yrs 12 Dec 1940 103 Bloar Street Addy Gertrude 56 yrs 13 Dec 1940 9 Windsor Road Addy Joseph 57 yrs 13 Dec 1940 9 Windsor Road Alcock Frederick 50 yrs 13 Dec 1940 34 St Marys Road Allen Mary 32 yrs 12 Dec 1940 High Street Antcliffe Arthur 10 yrs 15 Dec 1940 96 B
    1 point
  26. Well there are circa 70 in operation throughout the U.K. so there has to be a good reason why a city the size of Sheffield is unable to keep one open. Our son used to love his weekly trip to Sheffield Ski Village in the 1980’s, I recall it being both very well run and attended, answers on a postcard please.
    1 point
  27. My guess would be Balaclava Road. It's blocked off at the bottom end. The white line runs from the bottom of the ski slope, past the circle that was the gas holder and continues through the Infirmary Road Aldi. Balaclava Road is close by and the Council website shows planning permission granted for new buildings at Antiquity Ltd on this road.
    1 point
  28. No it was about a mile away, my mistake, High House Brewery would be a better guess. Henry James Dearden brewer High House Brewery 1854 directory
    1 point
  29. Hi. Some of this (if not all) was filmed in the workshops of Sanderson Kaysers on Newhall Road, Attercliffe. My dad worked there for 40+ years and was still there when filming took place.
    1 point
  30. Compleat is an archaic spelling of the word complete. Died out around the end of the 18th Century.
    1 point
  31. Lived at No.7, which is the house to the left of the gennel at the side of the van. That is in fact my dads old van. Spent many a Sunday off to Brid and Skeggy in that. Dare say the kids playing on the pavement are me and my brothers, I must have been about 5 when that was taken. Behind the camerashot, in the the right hand corner, was a scrap yard. Halfway down the road,on the right hand side was the rag and bone mans house. To the bottom of the road, fronting Broughton Lane, was the corner shop.
    1 point
  32. I remember West Bar Cop Shop. A few of us from the Helen Wilson Settlement Youth Club, at the bottom-end of Rutland Road, went for a look round the place. One of the officers brought in a police-dog called Caesar, and when I reached out to stroke it the officer pulled on it's lead to stop it getting any closer, and advised me an everybody else never to get your hand that close to a police dog's teeth. A couple of years later in 1969, me and a mate of mine went to a Judo class in an area somewhere close to the top floor. Our idea was to learn how to handle ourselves properly in the
    1 point
  33. If you go inside the hotel you can see they have preserved an inscription on a wall which if memory serves correctly details the opening of the building.
    1 point
  34. The big hitters usually entered for free, whilst mere mortals had to pay an admission charge that was quite expensive. It wasn’t that difficult to con them by walking in with the favoured few. However my mate borrowed his dad’s Rambler Rebel and parked it bang opposite to the entrance, we never had any further pay requests . I saw Cocker appear there, it was perfect for him, he was superb, the trouble was that the bar takings were very poor, who wanted to drink when they could enjoy Joe strutting his stuff? His heavy smoking habit finally saw him off six years ago, strangely enough I alwa
    1 point
  35. This is the best view from the other side that I've found in Picture Sheffield: https://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s44742&pos=1&action=zoom&id=129192 All the features in the picture at the top of this thread can be seen from the other side there.
    1 point
  36. The major problem with the old Great Central was that its London extension served lots of "cabbage patches" and, having been built at great cost, scarcely ever made a satisfactory financial return. Its line into the capital had not a single level crossing and was built to the Continental loading gauge. Its best locomotives were second to none...as was its best rolling stock, signalling and safety measures Sheffield Victoria was doomed as soon as the system became part of the Midland Region....who had no time for another line into London... especially as freight and passengers returns we
    1 point
  37. This map was posted on Twitter by the 'Picture Sheffield' website. I hadn't seen it before and thought others might be interested in browsing it. Apologies if it has been posted before. https://www.picturesheffield.com/maps.php?file=008
    1 point
  38. Some of the crosses mentioned in this thread appear in this 1736 map of Sheffield city centre.. https://www.picturesheffield.com/maps.php?file=008
    1 point
  39. Memory Dance: Local History History - Parks And Leisure Trailer (Ep 1) Parks and Leisure, showcases two home movies shot in the Peak and the Park (courtesy of the Andy Horsfield 60's archive), alongside a beautiful trip to a sweltering 1970s Sheffield Summer in the documentary, Free For All. Full broadcast begins 7PM, Wed 25 Nov 2020! Watch on Sheffield Live! TV (Freeview 7, Virgin 159, www.sheffieldlive.org/tv ) Stay updated by attending our online event > HERE < Another fantastic Sheffield Video! Watch video here 👉 Anyone remember the sweltering
    1 point
  40. An ancient street completely lost in the name of progress.
    1 point
  41. Am almost certain my Mum said this was where she met my Dad for the first time :-)
    1 point
  42. I see two women, in the middle of the road, dodging the low-flying reindeer. More numerous than seagulls on Bridlington sea-front they were. In those days, you used to get whole flocks of them, (women shoppers and reindeer), around Sheffield City Centre at that time of year. You don't tend to see so many of either these days. Jute coal-sacks - blooming awful things to carry when soaking wet, even more so when you had a lot of slack in the coal.
    1 point
  43. Has anyone noticed in the old photos of Sheffield shops, that quite a few had prices of goods painted on the outside wall, does this mean that prices were pretty stable? If it was today the painter wouldn't be at the bottom of his ladder before he had to up again to alter the price.
    1 point
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