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  1. Organgrinder

    Organgrinder

    Sheffield History Member


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  2. Unitedite Returns

    Unitedite Returns

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  3. tozzin

    tozzin

    Sheffield History Member


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  4. lysandernovo

    lysandernovo

    Sheffield History Member


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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 19/03/21 in Posts

  1. I don't know whether it's to do with the lockdown & Covid precautions and we are mainly staying at home but much of the site recently, has been taken up with photo's, videos etc of what's happening in the city centre now. Others may feel differently but I personally am not the slightest bit interested in today's modern Sheffield because I feel that the council and planners have ripped the heart out of everything this city meant to me. There was a bit of chat about the old Coles Bros etc but many seem not to care too much about the resulting demise of John Lewis and think it was t
    5 points
  2. I'm afraid that I disagree with that Dave, as my family and fore bears, like all those around us, shopped in the Rag & Tag, Castle Market, and Norfolk Market Hall, all their lives without dying of food poisoning or anything similar. We didn't battle for expensive parking places as we walked from Heeley to town, did our shopping and walked home again. In the old days there were no suburban supermarkets so we did much of our shopping at our local shops but always went to town on Saturdays and at holiday times besides works lunch times. I, personally always enjoyed shopping in town
    3 points
  3. Only odd because we've somewhat lost the original sense. Round about 1200 the phrase "Ȝif þou þis nelt don þou salt don worse" (If thou this not done, thou shalt do worse = If you don't do this, you'll do worse). This is the earliest example in the OED of "to do" being used in the sense of "to fare" or "to get on". A little later there is "‘We sal’, he said, ‘do nu ful wele’" (We shall, he said, do now full well) and later still "Your horsyn do well" (horses). In 1697 the phrase "There, how d'ye do now?" was recorded and by 1738 "How do you do, Tom?". You might be thought a bit od
    2 points
  4. You really would have to have been born into a certain class of society and in a certain period to really appreciate the benefits of the rag n tag, Norfolk Market Hall and Dixon Lane. It wasn't about prices (which were as low as they could get), nor was it about quality (which was as varied as you chose), it was about COMMUNITY. A community that travelled together on trams and buses, not cars, that walked long distances without thinking it extraordinary, that faced hardships such as coal rationing, very long snowbound winters and basic foodstuffs and which above all related to one another. Th
    2 points
  5. An enlargement of the platform building as depicted in the above image. Unfortunately, some of the fine details that the photographer captured for posterity have been lost in this compressed download. Copyright to this image is retained. However:- The classic MS&LR, cast-iron, platform signage, above the three visible doorways, from left to right, read GENERAL WAITING ROOM, LADIES WAITING ROOM and GENTLEMEN. Unfortunately, the full details on all of the five exhibited posters cannot be discerned, even at a very high scanning resolution, but the following text can be noted:-
    2 points
  6. The Sharrow Cycling club used to organise "The Sharrow Sports" bicycle track racing on the track that used to be around the cricket pitch at Bramall Lane in the late 1800's Here are a few pictures from the club album.
    2 points
  7. You raise an interesting point. Though most of our neighbours in Gleadless Avenue had been there for years (the houses were, I think, built in the 1920s), my parents were Chesterfield people and moved there only shortly before I was born, at the end of the 1940s. Certainly the Ledgers were long-established in the area: they had taken their house over from a man named Eddie Jarvis, who was a family member Yet I never felt any sense of "us and them". People just helped each other, perhaps not consciously, but because that was what you naturally did. A few days ago I was sifting through s
    1 point
  8. Well Fairthornroader, long time no see, hope you're still enjoying retirement. Sorry I'm not Gwenda. Last time we met was when you were visiting from Canada aged about 14. You must have attended for a brief time the boys part of my Grammar School and broke strict ranks from the boys dinner queue, daring to come to speak to an extremely shy teenager. Looked for you again but saw you only the once, you charmer! Mr Clarke, our teacher spotted me in a crowded department store in the 70's, with a smile and speaking with a much softer tone. He'd replaced Mr. Garner and then Mr. Smillie (who used to
    1 point
  9. Thank you very much for posting your video. I really enjoyed watching the same. It’s a very long time indeed since I last visited the L. D &. E. C. R., and I am both, amazed and saddened by how much this long defunct line has changed so much in the past 40+ years. I have taken the opportunity of sharing with you, some images taken by myself in “happier times”. I hope that you can relate them back to the remains and locations shown in your video. LDE001-Upperthorpe and Killamarsh Station Site, Looking North Towards Beighton-16/06/1977 LDE003-Upperthorpe and Killamar
    1 point
  10. I understand what you are saying, but at the same time capturing photos of the redevelopment will become part of history research in the future. I'm sure we would all love to see photos of Barkers Pool (the actual pool) being constructed, or the construction of the Queens Head pub off Pond Street, or of course Sheffield Castle. At the time of that construction, it would have probably appeared quite boring, only becoming interesting in years to come. As my old history teacher used to tell us - 'What happens today, becomes history tomorrow'.
    1 point
  11. They were probably attracted by the roundabout, giving them easy access to the Parkway 😀
    1 point
  12. Built by the Vulcan Foundry to works number 5084, in 1944, Austerity Class WD/8, No.90647, of Frodingham Shed (No.36C), approaches Beighton Station Signal Box and Level Crossing from the direction of Holbrook Colliery Sidings Signal Box, in 1964. The opposite direction from the image posted above. Holbrook Colliery Sidings Signal Box just visible behind the train.
    1 point
  13. Built at Swindon Works in 1959, Class 9F, No.92206, of York North Shed (50A), approaches Beighton Station Signal Box and Level Crossing from the direction of Woodhouse Junction in 1964. This locomotive was withdrawn in May 1967, after only eight years of service.
    1 point
  14. I don’t remember the last time I could have lemon on my kebab, nowhere I go to these days does it ! Great pic - a future historical gem
    1 point
  15. I can believe that, they were just putting their name on these projects, for future c.v.s, the present clowns in the big top they call the Town Hall, cannot stop littering, vandalism and worse of all graffiti but they can quite happily brag about the improvements to the city, I.e. closing streets to traffic in favour of cycles.
    1 point
  16. Well, what ever it is, it appears to be contagious 😁
    1 point
  17. Looked long and hard at the original image and I must say that it is intriguing. I can't help with any actual definitive information, that would confirm it's purpose, or location, but I would make the following observations:- Looks like a railway embankment in the background, and looks like it might be electrified (are those vertical lines, power traction gantries?) which would limit potential locations. Railway boundary looks to be of dry stone construction and therefore likely to be either North Sheffield, or Barnsley, or Rotherham. Probably somewhere on the Pennines. Installa
    1 point
  18. Back in the early postwar years my father worked for a company by the name of Sheffield Steel Products (SSP) Can anyone tell me if this company is still in existence today, or what became of it?
    1 point
  19. Yes, sad indeed. I went here after nights at Roxy’s in the ‘80s as a teenager. Then moved away from Sheffield in 1988. When I moved back here in 2018, and went wandering round the now much changed town centre, it brought a smile to my face, the fact that it was still there after all this time.
    1 point
  20. Probably was, certainly the first I heard of, and it was quite high profile indicating it was unusual. I preferred the Wapentake over the road. More my scene, table football, sticky floor, local bands and beer. Used to do basic food at dinnertime too!
    1 point
  21. Booker, Thos. (, town's husband & collector of rents & debts). Address: 14 Change Alley, in 1833. Recorded in: Whites History & Directory of Sheffield - 1833. Booker, Thos. (, accountant, appraiser and collector). Address: 4 Change alley, in 1837. Recorded in: Whites Directory of Sheffield & Rotherham - 1837.
    1 point
  22. Church of St Mary, Ecclesfield or Ecclesfield Church as I call it
    1 point
  23. The other pub near the Royal Hotel was the sportsman
    1 point
  24. That looks like the area near Arroyo de Miel , but could'nt quite pick out a part I recognised. Been there several times and it's a nice part of the world.
    1 point
  25. Check out the new King Mojo web site at http://www.kingmojostory.com
    1 point
  26. That sounds a likely reason for the name of the field; great that it's used and the name lives on! This picture of an OS map from 1937 shows a sports ground and pavilion on this site. It also marks three stones - picking up from the earlier post and the 1892-1914 map. Think these photos show two of them and what's left of one of them (along with bonus lambs). The markers in the same field have 'SH' inscribed in them.
    1 point
  27. My introduction to Classical Music was through a School Concert given by the Halle Orchestra and conducted by Sir John Barbitolli at the City Hall. I recall that two of the pieces were the Russlan & Ludmilla Overture and the Karelia Suite. My first pop concert was also there- Adam Faith supported by Emile Ford.
    1 point
  28. Have you looked in here for Kikis? I remember it - met my wife there - but no pics alas https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dirty-Stop-Outs-Guide-Sheffield/dp/1908431253
    1 point
  29. These look great - as a former DJ at the Palais, will you be re-creating that iconic looking club? Thanks green
    1 point
  30. I went there from 1956. My Uncle had intruduced me to classiucal music through records he had (bought from classics Club which you joined & they sent a record every month) . He bought us both a Saturday season ticket at City Hall & I loved it. Grdeatr memories of JB & the Halle live with me & I have a large collection of recofrdings of JB & Halle. In the 1960's I worked at ESC with 2 men in Sheffioeld Philharmonic Choir & I went with them in coaches for annual Messiah in Belle Vue. .I also recall a family visit (mum ,dad, grandma, Grandad & Uncle to the Free Trade
    1 point
  31. I much prefer Benalmadena Pueblo, situated below Mijas Pueblo, it’s far les of a tourist attraction, and parking is plentiful. The square is lovely, we actually spent a week in thr La Fonda Hotel which is close to the square.
    1 point
  32. Oops missed a '0' out jn my reply, should have been £300,000.
    1 point
  33. The cheap seats were also a bonus for those of us who enjoyed popular music. I well remember sitting behind Joan Baez....who turned her back on the auditorium and sang a song especially for we "poor" folk! My earliest recollection of the Halle Orchestra was going ,with school, to an afternoon concert especially for schoolchildren....that would be mid 1950s.
    1 point
  34. "Kabin".... a trade name for its shops?
    1 point
  35. Thorntons were a Sheffield brand ....a pleasant childhood memory in the days of sweet rationing.... They were a welcome diversification from the City's staples of steel and engineering. Sadly, they moved out of the City into Derbyshire some years ago. It would seem a combination of the fairly recent take over by a multi-national ( whose products , in my humble opinion, are not in the same league as are Thorntons )and the disastrous commercial affects of Covid 19 seem to have put the seal on those little shops, with staff wearing a distinctive uniform, selling the best chocolates ( with or wi
    1 point
  36. I firmly believe that the Sheffield council doesn’t care one iota about the old buildings of Sheffield and their history it’s always been the same attitude “ knock ‘em down “ I also have an idea that someone is making a lot of money with the demolition of our historical heritage.
    1 point
  37. I much preferred it with people going about their business, such as visiting the GPO, having a pint at the Elephant/Bell/Marples, visiting the News Theatre (Classic), waiting for a bus, hiring a cab or just passing the time of day with each other. The current square would be better named Nothingness Square IMHO, but everyone to their own.
    1 point
  38. Just found this picture of the Albert Hall amongst my mother-in-laws old photos - it says it was taken just after the fire
    1 point
  39. New video by Keith Skues
    1 point
  40. Seeing the cement factory brought a smile to my face! I was installing a heating system at a farm on the hillside over looking Castleton some time in the late 60s. The farmer was having a running battle with Peak Planning about the sighting of his caravan, Peak Planning wanted it storing out of sight so it couldn't be seen from the Villiage. The farmer replied using a few choice words!! when you take down that chimney I'll shift my caravan.
    1 point
  41. I have just found this thread, more than a year later. I went to Gleadless County and remember being in Mrs Bell’s class in the infants and, I think, Miss Anderson’s. In the juniors I had Mr Slater, J1, Miss Parkin, J2, and Mr Iosson for J3 and 4, in the huts. He liked to grow coleus plants in the greenhouse. I think we did a bit plant nurturing too. Michael Elliott was the post master’s son, in my class. I remember swinging on climbing bars just in front of the outside toilets at the back of the yard. In the front yard, we played rounders against other school teams, alway
    1 point
  42. Agreed. Always good to see photos of my part of town, being born & raised near Townend. Not that I remember what Gleadless Road used to look like around the Heeley & Sheffield, but some of the other shots are familiar to me. The postmaster in the 1960s was Artie Elliott. The library at Manor Top was Manor Library. Gleadless Library is on White Lane. It used to look like this, but that building has been replaced. Glad to see it is still open, though. It was at Gleadless Library that my love of books and reading was born. Visits to my grandfather who lived in C
    1 point
  43. My brother is buried there, but haven't been down in ages. I don't want to, really, looking at these awful scenes.
    1 point
  44. When these stones have all been bought and paid for surely someone should be paid compensation for their vandalism ? Do they not inform the relatives before they begin their destruction? And surely before the destruction of the stones they should be offered to the family as it belongs to them not the graveyards keepers.
    1 point
  45. I think its been like that for a good few years now darren. As a child my dad would often pick me up at "home time" from Hillfoot School, we would then follow the waterside to the power station. At the time the last cooling tower was still under construction and the overhead buckets were still in use. Further on we would cut through Wardsend, have a look at the old chapel then go up and over the concrete railway bridge, there we would stop and wait for the express trains steaming to and from Sheffield Victoria then make our way home for tea. [ I still miss my dad.] Happy days. W/E.
    1 point
  46. I am finally surfacing after a horrible few months, beset by illness death and work commitments. A few things have got to be said about Wardsend. Firstly, it is still in the possession of the Church of England. I have pursued this religiously (forgive the pun) for over 2 years now, to unanswered emails and non returned phonecalls The Friends of Wardsend were originally part of The Hillsborough Trust. The same names appear on documents. The National Federaton of Cemetery Friends have had no contact since 2005 from the Wardsend group. The Hillsborough Trust went in 2008 havin
    1 point
  47. There are only about three of them, all pensioners. What they need is more volunteers [how about you?] and an injection of cash.
    1 point
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