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  1. 5 points
    Hi all, so glad I found this site, so much history in one place. I was born at walkley in 65, moved to Bubwith rd Brightside where my mum was born and grandparents lived. From there we lived in a cottage in Roe Woods, my dad became one of the first 6 park patrollers, on motorbikes, in Sheffield while at Roe Wood. From there we moved to Shiregreen where mum still lives. Dad was born at the bottom end of Bellhouse rd. Have lived in a few places in Sheffield and now 20 years in Chesterfield. Looking forward to reading lots more and to dig up some of my own memories and photos to share with everyone. :-))
  2. 4 points
    Here is one of my Grandfather's glass slides of High Street that looks to be taken from about the same place
  3. 4 points
    Last year's thread and I rediscovered this 35mm slide which seems to fit appropriately into this one.Taken in June 1963 when rear loaders were favourite and steam locos much in evidence at Midland Station.
  4. 3 points
    I've got several locations with pictures, but never seen an exposure as big as this one. 4 lines into 2? Any other geeks might want to keep an eye out down there, as they are redeveloping it, so more might be uncovered. Exchange Place into Blonk Street
  5. 3 points
    Fitzalan Square exposed Jun 2019
  6. 3 points
    Many thanks for the comments on the maps we have been uploading to Picture Sheffield recently. The City Archives and Local Studies Library has a wonderful collection comprising thousands of maps dating from the 16th century onwards. We are trying to give the collection a higher profile and make it available to as many people as possible. The maps are scanned at exactly the same resolution as the photographs. The difference however comes from the need to compress very large maps down to a size where they fit on a computer screen. In the light of recent comments however we have reviewed how we process the map images. The zoomed image is now larger and presented in a higher quality format. Hopefully this allows you to see more detail without slowing down the performance of Picture Sheffield. We are currently working our way through all of the map images on Picture Sheffield to improve them. The series prefixed ‘arc’ is complete. The other main set of maps (prefixed ‘y’) should be complete within a few weeks. As well as viewing the maps on Picture Sheffield the originals remain available at the City Archives and at the Local Studies Library in the Central Library should you wish to consult them. We welcome everyone who wishes to use the service in person or online. If you have any further comments or suggestions feel free to contact me via archives@sheffield.gov.uk Peter Evans, Archives and Heritage Manager
  7. 3 points
    We believe we have the only pre-war Guy Vixen still in existence, please tell me if you know of another, this is a 1938 and will be seen at all the local rally's
  8. 3 points
    My grandfather was a keen amateur photographer who died before I was born. My father had a box of his 3" glass slides that I inherited and have now digitised. Unfortunately only 2 are of Sheffield street scenes. Many of them are in the Yorkshire dales. There is even one that he took in Bruges and took one from the same bridge in Bruges to prove it. I have uploaded Fitzalan square previously. "Blade forging" was written on the other picture and may be my Grandmother's family.
  9. 3 points
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  10. 3 points
    Hello , I`m Kate , thanks for letting me join . Although I have lived in Cornwall for many years , I was born in Sheffield ( Derbyshire Lane ) and spent my youth in and around the city . I have particularly fond memories of the area around Meersbrook and Albert Road where my beloved grandparents lived , I spent a lot of time with them at number 178 , long demolished for some flats . I have old photos of their garden overlooking the Meersbrook and on up to the park , but sadly no one in the family has any photos of the front of the terrace on Albert Road . I would dearly love to visit Sheffield again but my husbands health is not good so I content myself with memories !
  11. 3 points
    From various Church magazines. St Cuthberts mid 1940s, St Hildas late 1960s, early 70s.
  12. 3 points
    Here is an extract from the 1950 OS survey Meersbrook Park in June 1963.
  13. 3 points
    Finally! I found an image showing the building that was shown on the far left of the original photograph. The white gable end with the double chimney appears to be connected with the Abbeydale Mill. At least I think that’s what the signage above the door reads? So, I believe this is the building that was shown with the purple circle in my earlier photo. http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;u03677&action=zoom&pos=6&id=38830&continueUrl= Some more images of the area, in both directions, in different decades.... http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12848&action=zoom&pos=41&id=15752&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12951&action=zoom&pos=43&id=15850&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s16449&action=zoom&pos=48&id=19166&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12850&action=zoom&pos=57&id=15754&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;w00051&pos=7&action=zoom&id=45420
  14. 3 points
    Made in Great Britain, BBC2, Series exploring how the craft and manufacturing skills have shaped Great Britain Friday 26th October, 2100 hrs. run time, 59 minutes . Episode 1 https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bpz4ks The makers experience Sheffield's transformation into an industrial powerhouse known as 'Steel City', famous throughout the world for making high quality steel and cutlery. In this episode, four craft-makers experience Sheffield's rapid transformation from a rural market town to an industrial powerhouse that built modern Britain known as 'Steel City'. Sheffield became famous throughout the world for making high quality steel blades and cutlery. Steph McGovern takes them through the ages and they are guided by local Sheffield cutler Corin Mellor. Starting in the 18th century, they are tasked with hand forging a scythe at Abbeydale Works. This farming tool found recent fame when used by a shirtless Poldark, but the makers discover it was one of Sheffield's biggest exports that launched Britain's steel industry. The process proves to be a hugely physical challenge. Next, they step into the heart of a Victorian production line to make cutlery stamped with the fashionable King's Pattern. Steph learns that the extravagant Victorian middle class had a different piece of cutlery for every type of food. They prepare the knives, forks and spoons ready for electroplating - 'blinging' up the cutlery by covering it in silver. The biggest innovations are yet to come. Travelling forward to the start of the 20th century, the makers learn that stainless steel was discovered in Sheffield, bringing affordable cutlery to the masses. They experience Sheffield's transformation into a war machine to defend Britain - making WWII Commando Knives using a heavy duty drop stamp. Now in the 21st century, Corin Mellor takes the makers to his state-of-the-art factory, David Mellor Design. Here, they make high-end stainless steel forks from one of factory's bestselling ranges. With the city's focus on quality rather than quantity, the craft-makers discover that Sheffield's historic cutlery industry is still thriving.
  15. 3 points
    I think this answers the question - Woodbourn Hotel FC - lots of press cuttings to piece the story together.
  16. 3 points
    I may be my age but to me "then" usually looks better than "now".
  17. 2 points
    I'm not sure what the item is, but I'm pretty sure it doesn't relate to the trams. The trolley pole of a tram is insulated all the way to the end, with only the small wheel on the tip being live. The 550V DC was then carried down a heavy cable inside the hollow metal pole, first to a circuit breaker, then to the lighting circuit and controllers and then on to the motors. The pole was turned either by the conductor pulling on a rope from ground level, which was permanently attached to the trolley head, or by using a seperate bamboo pole when no rope was fitted. What it may be (although I've never seen one anything like this) is a device for recovering a "grounded" tram. Grounding occurs when the wheels become electically isolated from the track, which forms the negative return for the electrical circuit. Besides stopping the tram, grounding can be quite dangerous as the high voltage DV tries to find the shortest route it can from the overhead wire to the tracks. If it can't pass through the motors etc and out through the wheels there is a very good chance it will pass into the body of the tramcar. If this happens, anyone standing on or near the tracks (particularly on a damp day) who touches the tram will likely complete the circuit and experience a 550V DC shock. If they were to grap a handrail the shock would likely make theior muscles contract, meaning they are unable to let go, so prolonging the peroid of shock. The official way the Tramway Museum at Crich deal with a grounding is for everyone aboard the tram to be kept aboard. One of the platform staff (usually the conductor) then JUMPS off, making sure their body entirely leaves the tram before any part of them touches the ground. Next, using either the iulated rope attached to the trolley or a bamboo pole which can be found at staategic points along the route, the trolley is hooked down off the wire to cut off the electrical supply to the vehicle. The tram is then pushed or pulled ontpo a cleaner bit of track, where hopefully it's no longer grounded when the power is restored. This can be checled easily by turning the saloon lights on. There are other simpler 'dirty' methods for dealing with a grounding. One involves jumping from the tram and then throwing a bucket of water under the wheels. The water is a pretty good conductor at these voltages and will also swill away some of the dirt from the rails. This trick usually works and was common in the days when fire buckets full of water were common place. The other method, and also the most risky, is to jump from the tram with the point iron in your hand. The point iron is a thing a bit like a crowbar that all trams carry for changing the points. Just infront of the tram you have to wedge the end of the point iron into the groove of the track, making sure it is in contact with good metal. Then, with a swift and positive motion, ram the other end of the point iron down across the fender of the tram, scraping off as much paint as you can as you do so. The theory is because you made the connection with the track first, when the point iron touches the tram the current travels down the metal bar to the track without harming the person holding it. However if you get it the wrong way around and touch it on the tram first, then you'll likely get a 550V DC whack! I knew a chap who made this mistake while on a special tram tour in Sheffield in the late 50s or early 60s, which ran over some disused and hence dirty tracks. He didn't remember much about the shock, but woke up on the opposite side of the Moor to where he started! Luckily he lived to tell the tale! The thing on the pole could be something for wedging in the track and then attaching to the tram. Or it may be something for holding down the trolley if no rope is fitted and it can't be tied to the rear fender, which is the normal practice.
  18. 2 points
    In preparedness' for the South Yorkshire Transport Trust Open Day on Sunday I have been updating my lists of surviving buses with a local connection. Having now found away to convert and save these in a compatible format for this forum I can now make these available. The first can be found below and lists the survivors that were once in the fleets of Sheffield Transport Department / Joint Omnibus Committee,
  19. 2 points
    An updated list of Surviving vehicles acquired new / second hand or loaned to SYPTE. Surviving South Yorkshire PTE motorbuses Single-deckers 80 KCR 108P Leyland National 10351/2R / Leyland (ex Portsmouth) 79 KSO 74P Leyland National 10351/2R / Leyland (ex Grampian) 11 AAK 111T Leyland National 10351B/1R / Leyland 1075 FWA 475V Leyland National NL106L11/1R / Leyland 22 KWA 22W Leyland National NL116L11/1R / Leyland 76 B976 DWG Dennis Dorchester / Plaxton (B674 GWJ) 41 C41 HDT Dennis Domino / Optare 53 C53 HDT Dennis Domino / Optare Single-deckers hired during 1981 crisis 1972 GAT 180D Leyland Panther PSUR1/1 / Roe (hired from Kingston upon Hull CT 3-4/81) Single-deckers hired for trials and evaluation 1004 GNC 276N Seddon-Lucas / Pennine (hired from GMPTE) Bendi-buses 2006 CRM 927T Leyland-DAB / Leyland 2009 FHE 292V Leyland-DAB / Leyland 2010 FWA 450V Leyland-DAB / Leyland 2013 C113 HDT Leyland-DAB /Leyland-DAB Double-deckers 377 LWB 377P Ailsa B55-10 / Van-Hool McArdle 388 LWB 388P Ailsa B55-10 / Van-Hool McArdle 1647 XWG 647T Leyland Atlantean AN68A/1R / Roe 1655 XWG 655T Leyland Atlantean AN68A/1R / Roe 1696 CWG 696V Leyland Atlantean AN68A/1R / Alexander 1707 CWG 707V Leyland Atlantean AN68A/1R / Alexander 1756 CWG 756V Leyland Atlantean AN68A/1R / Roe 1861 JHE 161W Metrobus DR104 / MCW 1781 JKW 281W Leyland Atlantean AN68B/1R / Alexander 1790 JKW 290W Leyland Atlantean AN68B/1R / Alexander 1831 JKW 331W Leyland Atlantean AN68B/1R / Marshall 2120 KKU 120W Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2214 NKU 214X Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2260 SDT 260Y Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2298 A298 XAK Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2317 A317 XAK Dennis Dominator / Northern Counties 1918 A118 XWE Metrobus DR104 / MCW 2414 A414 YAK Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2361 B361 CDT Dennis Domiator / East Lancs 2450 C45 HDT Dennis Dominator / Alexander –hybrid trolleybus 2457 C877 JWE Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2462 C882 JWE Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2479 D479 OWE Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2489 D489 OWE Dennis Dominator / Alexander Double-deckers hired during 1981 crisis 1964 PBC 98G Leyland Atlantean PDR1A/1 / ECW (hired from Leicester CT 3-6/81) 1938 WHN 411G Bristol VRTSL6G / ECW (hired from Lincolnshire RCC 4/81) Double-deckers hired for trials and evaluation 500 TOJ 592S Metrobus DR101/2 / MCW (hired from MCW – famous five) 530 NHG 732P Leyland Titan B15 / Park Royal (hired from Leyland – famous five) Surviving SYPTE Support vehicles M51 DSA 987 AEC Matador Recovery (previously Salford City Transport)
  20. 2 points
    With the South Yorkshire Transport Trust 2019 Open Day a few days away I been updating my lists of Surviving SYPTE and Constituents buses. Below is my listing of SJOC/STD vehicles along with those of the absorbed independents that ran into Sheffield. Surviving Sheffield (SJOC/STD) motorbuses Single-deckers 216 JWB 416 Leyland PS1 / Weymann 54 DWB 54H AEC Swift / Park Royal Double-deckers 116 OWE 116 AEC Regent III / Roe 687 RWB 87 Leyland PD2/12 / Weymann 525 1925 WA AEC Bridgemaster / Park Royal 1156 3156 WE Leyland PD2/30 / Roe (3156) 904 3904 WE Leyland PD3/1 / Roe (used as DIV) (D14) 1330 6330 WJ AEC Regent V / Roe 874 7874 WJ AEC Regent V / Alexander 1357 657 BWB Leyland Atlantean PDR1/1 / Park Royal (used as DIV) (227 – M120) 1148 DWB 148H Leyland Atlantean PDR2/1 / Park Royal converted to roadshow bus (748) 257 NWA 257K Daimler Fleetline /Alexander 271 OWE 271K Bristol VRT / East Lancs 287 SWB 287L Leyland Atlantean / Alexander 293 UWA 293L Leyland Atlantean / Alexander 296 UWA 296L Leyland Atlantean / Alexander 312 UWA 312L Leyland Atlantean / East Lancs 754 WWJ 754M Daimler Fleetline / Park Royal Ordered by STD delivered to SYPTE 836 GNA 836N Daimler Fleetline / ECW 1515 OKW 515R Daimler Fleetline / MCW (DMS style) – were to have been Alexander 1534 PWE 534R Daimler Fleetline / Alexander Double-deckers cut down 3108 CWJ 410 AEC Regent / Weymann converted to tower wagon (TW58) 4624 GWJ 724 AEC Regent / Sheffield converted to gritting/towing wagon (G54) 255 KWE 255 AEC Regent III / Roe converted to gritting/towing wagon (G55) 913 3913 WE Leyland PD3/1 / Roe converted to gritting/towing wagon (M10) (OWJ 357A) 475 4475 WE Leyland PD3/1 / Roe converted to gritting/towing wagon (M52) (OWJ 388A) Double-deckers re-bodied after disposal 287 CWB 987 Leyland TD4C / Cravens ( re-bodied c1952 by Crossville with ex Salford Metro-Cammell body) Surviving Sheffield (SJOC/STD) support vehicles T47 KWJ 681 Fordson TN Tractor L42 RWE 101 Leyland Comet Lorry Surviving Booth & Fisher Motor Services motorbuses Single-deckers ---- TUH 14 Albion Nimbus NS3N / Harrington (ex Western Welsh) ---- WRA 12 AEC Monocoach / Park Royal 1086 334 NKT AEC Reliance 2MU3RV / Weymann (ex Maidstone & District) 1088 340 NKT AEC Reliance 2MU3RV / Weymann (ex Maidstone & District) Surviving Dearneways motorbuses Single-deckers 1092 AWJ 292T Leyland Leopard PSU3E/4R / Plaxton C51F (368 SHX)
  21. 2 points
    Fitzalan Square this morning. Nice section exposed.
  22. 2 points
    Its 25 years ago today (21st March 1994) that the Supertram opened for passengers. The first tram from Meadowhall carried the local dignitaries, press etc, and the second one carried those daft enough to get up early to get to Meadowhall for just after 6am, I was one of those! There was such a long queue of people going through the long winded procedure of buying a ticket at one machine and validating it at another, that the tram left late but with a full load. First journeys were Meadowhall to Commercial Street and when we arrived I got cornered by a Star photographer and ended up with my photo in that nights paper. Nigel L
  23. 2 points
    I've been uploading my old Sheffield footage again, with slightly better editing this time. I drove around Kelham Island earlier, and linked this to my new postings in here I'm glad I found this old recording from 2005. Although it's not exactly ancient history, I was originally just recording sections of the old ring road, but on way home, had decided to drive around Kelham Island - and glad I did now! It really shows the difference. I remember that the Alfred Beckett building being one of the first to be 'done up'. It reminds me that when I drove around there that it seemed like a risk to buy there, but could pay off (as I seen Manc/Birm old areas revamped), and if the area was done up well it would work. - I was disappointed recently though, that the building on Green Lane (before the old school building - on the right - in the film) didn't at least retain the front. (it's currently in building process - this one)
  24. 2 points
    So many interesting things in this postcard on Ebay. The well known buildings of the period including the Foster's buildings, Central Hotel and Cafe, Walsh's and in the distance the Fitzalan Market Hall and, I think, old Town Hall. What really appeals to me though are the different vehicles, the trams, a Growler, what looks like a Landau and two donkey carts carrying advertisements for The Empire. ------------------ https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/382787090206?ul_noapp=true
  25. 2 points
    Hello The other day I was cycling round Brightside and went up Colliery Road and wondered why it was there, its too narrow for two way traffic and the bridges are too low. After some time researching I have written this short essay, I think I have gleaned as much as I can for this without having to make a visit to Sheffield Archives. https://www.g7smy.co.uk/2019/04/history-colliery-road/ Karl
  26. 2 points
    I grew up on Ridgehill Ave leaving in 1966 when I was 14. Hollinsend Rec was our local park, an all year round venue. I remember the Whit Sunday parade and also have a vague memory of a fun day, with a clown and other entertainment. The park keeper (parky) in those days was Jack Metcalfe, a pleasent chap who knew most of our names. Every evening at dusk the parky would blow his whistle, clearing the park before locking the gates to the main park and play ground. The park buildings were all painted Sheffield green, a paint source which found it's way to various houses around the city! The large wooden hut in the play ground was open at the front, so once we knew the parky had gone home we would climb over the fence and use it as our den. I have a broken front tooth which is a result of an accident in the play ground. I was climbing on the front of the cast iron rocking horse when my pal Timmy Brammer jumped on at the back causing the head to fly up and clout me in the mouth! I attended Gleadless County School and the headteacher at that time was Mr Jack Spur. Our teacher in the top juniors was Mr Dyson and I also remember Barbara Metcalfe who was the other top junior teacher. She used to take us swimming to Park Baths on City Road. I remember Mr Spur passing away when we were in the early years at Hurlfield but I can't remeber the circumstances of his death. In those days the school was only on one side of Hollisend Road, the new buildings on the other side of the road were added later. My brother John passed away in 2004 and so we scattered his ashes in the long grass by the little stream. I was surprised to see that the stream had almost dried up, when we were kids it was quite fast flowing and was full of frogs and tiny fresh water shrimps. Wonderful childhood memories of a much loved park! Wazzie Worrall
  27. 2 points
    Sorry I misunderstood. What I do is use the "unread content button" which should appear as on one of the pictures below , and when on the "unread content" page there should be a link top left or on the left of the same line to "activity". The activity page appears in order of date with latest activity first. You can also "mark the site read" so that old content that doesn't interest you will not appear in the unread content. "Mark the site read" in the top instance is in the menu extreme top right or in the second just to the right of unread content.
  28. 2 points
    modern 'journalism' at its finest. Hide behind youtube and stir some s***. It brought the city together, made us very proud to be sheffielders and remembered the lads who paid the ultimate sacrifice. who plants the bedding plants and sweeps up from time to time is of little or no consequence. I dont see what youre trying to achieve by posting it to be honest.
  29. 2 points
    Update to the landlords of the Bird in Hand (originally next door to the Cutlers Hall, demolished in 1832 for the west end of the new hall) from R E Leader's History of the Cutlers Company: 1736 - 1738 Matthias Hobson 1741 - 1755 William Dixon 1757-1759 John Thompson after 1761 Richard Brittlebank, then John Colquhoun 1772 - 1808 John Rose to 1817 Thomas Rose 1809 John Richards
  30. 2 points
    He was 'sentenced' to the training ship by the Board of Guardians in 1901, after being caught stealing pence at school. He was born 1890 and raised in the Workhouse/Children's Homes up to that point. In Dec 1905, after 4 years of being on the training ship, during an inspection on the Southampton, he is found to be too small and it was recommended he should be sent out to a farming situation, and that the training ship should only be for strong boys. This info was found in the Guardian Minute Books held at the Sheffield Archives. Someone was kind enough to get that much info a few years back for me. So by this time, he would be nearing 16 years of age if taken off the training ship after that report. It is another 9 years before start of WWI, which he enlists, and it is those 9 years I am trying to find where he was and what he was doing. So for the 1911 census, that is half way between and gives me a glimpse. He is actually 21 by the 1911 census as his birth register shows he was older than he thought. His grave marker is off by 2 years. Most curious as to what he did from 1905 until the 1911 census. I know the answer will likely never be really known, but it sure is nice to slowly see what his life was about before coming to Canada. Hopefully he enjoyed the drayman job and stayed on there until he enlisted, where he continued on with horse, being with the R.H. and R.F.A. as a Driver. Thank you all so much for the photos and extra digging of information that I can't access over here! Much appreciated. Here is a photo showing his sentence...
  31. 2 points
    Here's a great video by a real train driver filmed by him, with explanations of the route taken this year. With unedited passage through tunnels and yes Totley Tunnel. The only time he stops the video is waiting time at stations. Things to watch for include the speed signs, especially into Sheffield. Plus how quickly the train accelerators. When he stops the train in a station, the driver has to know when to apply the brakes. There's nothing telling him now stop for the next station.
  32. 2 points
    Welcome KateR , I think you will find that you have come to the best place for Sheffield history and memories. I have fond memories of the Heeley and Meersbrook area having lived and worked round that area in a few locations from the late 40's to the late 70's . I have not got a picture of the front of that house but if I am right in saying that it was just past Brooklyn Road I think you will be able to pick it out on this 1935 aerial shot.
  33. 2 points
    Hello I was recently (and not unusually) in a charity shop looking at some teaspoons in an open cutlery sized cardboard box. I was “umming and ahing” about buying these 6 Victorian electroplated spoons that lacked any “meaningful” maker’s marks. That was until I turned the box lid over. I paid the money and the box (and the spoons) were mine. The image of the box lid is below, and that box had nothing to do with the contents. I was going to tack my photo on to somebody else’s thread, but I was astounded to not find that neither “Debesco Works” or the “Lewis Rose” concern that was based there, or “Roses” renowned owner are referenced on the forum. I already knew “stuff” about the “Debesco trademark” and “Lewis Rose Company Ltd” from another forum and the below illustrated spoon (that once might well have been covered by a box lid like that in my photo) is one of my own favoured spoons for making a coffee with. It seems from a Sheffield museums reference that the “Lewis Rose Company Ltd” was set up in 1922 by Isadore Lewis starting in the Mappin Buildings in Norfolk Street. Debesco was their trademark and Debesco Works was the name of a possible expanded workplace on Norfolk St. and Norfolk Lane (a P.S. about this later). There is elsewhere a reference also to a Debesco works on Eyre St. More clarification required please. My interest in Lewis Rose was with spoons and forks but below is some bladed interest. It is speculation on my part to suggest that the “Firth’s Stainless” knives in the photo may be pre WW2 while the knives with what appears to be a “Larko” Lewis Rose trademark could be post WW2. By the way who know what "whitening" is? My wife told me 1 option. The Spear & Jackson Company acquired Lewis Rose in 1969 but since the post WW2 period Lewis Rose had been using the “Ashberry” name in its production, as it had acquired Sheffield’s “Peter Ashberry&Sons” prior to WW2. I have given some ideas about Lewis Rose but any observations that can add to the story or contradict things are definitely required. But now why is there no reference on the forum to “Isadore Lewis, described by Sheffield’s Museums as Sheffield’s first Jewish Lord Mayor. Reference http://collections.museums-sheffield.org.uk/view/people/asitem/items@null:415/0?t:state:flow=34948cb9-a938-479b-b915-8bf7884dffb2 That was in 1963 and below is my last photo to show some of what his company was doing in the War years. That’s it fulfilling War Department broad arrow contracts facilitating our Army to march on its stomach. If there are any more “anoraks” like me, the 1942 item was a spoon and the 1944 item was a fork. The L.R.& Co. Ltd. has also been attributed elsewhere to Lewis Rose. Kalfred P.s. A little question here about Norfolk Lane. It does not appear on Google maps, but a Norfolk Row is there. Norfolk Lane addresses are to be found in “Sheffield Indexers” but latest address was 1925. Picturesheffield.com photos “shows rear” Howard Street and Norfolk Lane and Norfolk Lane from Howard St. I hope “Edmund” of cartography fame can help again.
  34. 2 points
    Having taken a long hard look again my opinion is that we are being somewhat confused by the strength of the camera's ability to foreshorten the distances we are seeing. The first road junction nearest to the camera is Charles Street (on both sides of the road) and the new looking boarding on the left surrounded the site shown in the PS s24079 image (Cambridge Arcade etc.). The concrete street lighting columns would have been erected at approximately 100 foot intervals,subject to practical considerations,and if you look at their number on the original picture and how close they appear to be,that demolition site is the whole of that block of shops. That illuminated circular sign and solid white line would be a 'STOP' whilst there are double yellow lines just visible,on both photos,on the opposite side of the road corner. Between us , we seem to be getting more of the pieces of this one sorted out and just to prove that older threads can be very useful the camera location on this one would have been near to the old Barrel Inn!
  35. 2 points
  36. 2 points
    Having not so far been reprimanded for straying over the boundary into Rotherham I will tempt fate by adding an updated list of all known survivors of Rotherham Corporation Transport (RCT) motorbuses, trolleybuses and support vehicles in Great Britain, three in each category. Actually a very small number when compared with other municipal operations of a similar size. Of particular note is FET 218 the Austin K8 Welders Truck dating back to 1949. Although sold into preservation by SYPTE in 1977 it had been presumed the lack of any reports in recent years were an indication that it no longer survived. That however was not the case and in the last couple of months ownership has changed and it has returned to South Yorkshire. Despite being stored in the open for over twenty years it is in reasonable condition with a full restoration expected to get underway shortly No photographs of FET 218 in service have yet emerged so if anyone has any please make contact. It now has a pick-up style of back which during its later days had a frame with canvas cover. Whether this was how it was originally configured is not known for sure as a previous owner recalls that it may have originally had a conventional van body that was cut down by RCT at some point. Thus the appeal for photographs. Although a number of Austin K8's have been restored, pictures of which can be found on the net, none have a similar pick up style back which does suggest that the one on FET 218 may be a product of the Rawmarsh Road body shop.
  37. 2 points
    With respect, I'm not convinced that the photo is on Wostenholm Road? I found another image on PS from the opposite direction, at the junction with Priory Place and Albany Road, but several details in this image contradict the original (Catenary Poles on wrong side, wall and trees on Priory Place side, etc.) http://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s16495&amp;pos=4&amp;action=zoom&amp;id=19211 Looking at the tram routes of the time, the Tinsley <> Carbrook <> City <> Millhouses (and eventually Beauchief) route, I have a theory that this image might be at the end of Abbeydale Road, where it becomes Abbeydale Road South, at the junction of Archer (prev. Station) Road and Springfield Road. The junction looked a lot different then and some of the buildings have now gone, whereas others weren't even built. The tram tracks are single at this point and the catenary poles are on the right side (and the same design). I marked on a map where I think the photograph was taken from and in which direction (the orange arrow) The red circle is now the Abbey Frier (note the pitch of the roof, the upper windows and high lintels) The green circle are buildings that have been demolished when the junction was widened The blue circle shows the building that is now 'Chirofirst' (note the steep pitch of the roof and the top floor, double mullioned window) The purple circle is the building (now demolished) beyond the junction of Archer Road (the building that is now 'La Scala' restaurant is out of shot on the left) The last photo shows tram No.60 travelling in the opposite direction to the Millhouses terminus, with the buildings marked in the same colour coding. I may be mistaken, but the dip and slight bend in the road look right, as do the buildings that are visible in shot. Of course, I may be a million miles away, but maybe others have an opinion?
  38. 2 points
    Thought this would be quite easy to answer until I spotted a glaring omission in the published Rotherham Corporation Transport Fleet Histories I consulted. All these omitted the 1952 batch of Crossley Double Deckers! Perhaps the reason for the question? Anyhow, further delving reveals these to be 209 - 214 HET 209-214. However, the chassis numbers are not in numerical sequence when it comes to road registrations and quoted delivery months. 95903 HET 509 209 5/52 95904 HET 510 210 6/52 95905 HET 511 211 6/52 95906 HET 512 212 7/52 95907 HET 514 214 9/52 95908 HET 513 213 8/52 Thus, although 213 was the last Crossley built for Rotherham it was not the last delivered. . As far as I am aware 213 is still tucked away in a bomb proof hanger at the Science Museum store at Wroughton Airfield near Swindon. Public Access is now very restricted if permitted at all. Can't say too much on a public forum other than to say an approach was made about displaying 213 at the Midland Road Open Day in 2014. Unfortunately the hoops were set too high for it to have been practical. The hope had been to display all two and a half surviving RCT Motor buses together but in the event only 135 made it, With so few RCT motor buses surviving it is to be hoped that 213 can return home at some point in the future. The South Yorkshire Transport Museum being an ideal home especially since 220 has departed for Beamish. Hope this digression into Rotherham is within the permitted boundaries of this forum.
  39. 2 points
    The new series of Doctor Who is to be filmed in Sheffield.
  40. 2 points
    According to the above article the original building was largely pulled down in 1868. However a building on the site was still called Attercliffe Hall. In 1878 "Attercliffe Hall" was a club for working men - with a bar - the steward was Mr Milner, presumably of the Milners who had previously resided there. In February 1879 part of the hall was advertised for rent: four low rooms, four bedrooms, W.C., stable and coach-house. Gamalial Milner occuped Attercliffe House or Hall - on Attercliffe Green Road, changed to Lord Street, now Leeds Road
  41. 2 points
    Anyone living in any of these houses may be interested in this postcard on Ebay. ------------------- https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/173604248815?ul_noapp=true Google Street View -------https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.3837307,-1.4973794,3a,75y,81.23h,90.51t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s24w0G3NbxJMMlYOd7eyZgw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656?hl=en
  42. 2 points
    Photo by Elaine Goddard and what a photo!
  43. 2 points
  44. 2 points
    A great view of Sheffield on this 1915 post card currently offered on Ebay. Taken I think from Norfolk Park, that is certainly The Farm with I think possibly the park entrance and lodge on Norfolk Park Road bottom left. Plenty of famous Sheffield buildings across the middle including, (left to right) St. George's, St. Matthew's, The Albert Hall, St. Paul's, the Town Hall, Walker and Hall's and the Cathedral. ------------------- https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/382568503293?ul_noapp=true
  45. 2 points
    A map (early 1950's) showing where the Dolphin beerhouse was (corner of Summer street and Mushroom Lane)
  46. 2 points
    Yes they were and a load of timber plus other things like pipes. But no demolition will take out everything. Something always gets left behind. Even the people taking it down will leave there waste behind.
  47. 2 points
  48. 2 points
    Yes, if my memory is correct there were six in a row and you still had to queue for one at busy times in the 50's and 60's.
  49. 2 points
  50. 2 points
    Yes, it is a real treat to see the art of a good bricklayer. Features like this often go unobserved, till some good person notices one day, that a skilled hand has created something unique in our midst. Good on you Shumack ! I was told years ago, by a Sheffield Historian, that 'people don't look up enough, and see what beautiful work is on our buildings'. He was absolutely right, it made me start to take notice, of the incredible and intricate artwork and detailed patterned facades around some of our vintage buildings. The modern buildings in comparison are rather boring.
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