Jump to content

Leaderboard

  1. Sheffield History

    Sheffield History

    Sheffield History Team


    • Points

      9

    • Content Count

      5,919


  2. SteveHB

    SteveHB

    Sheffield History Admin


    • Points

      7

    • Content Count

      10,408


  3. neddy

    neddy

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      5

    • Content Count

      1,148


  4. tozzin

    tozzin

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      4

    • Content Count

      1,341



Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 25/05/20 in Posts

  1. 2 points
    What do we know about the history of the Salvation Army Citadel building? It seems to have been neglected for years although there's talk of it finally being redeveloped and utilised again!
  2. 2 points
    Just back from one of my regular walks in the General Cemetery where I unexpectedly found the grave of Charles Ross. I'm interested in him as his name appears all over Sheffield's pavements. The firm made coal hole covers, tramway features, and more. Strangely I've found only one drain cover of his (just off Thompson Road at the bottom of the Botanical Gardens) which is in the c.1900-10 style.
  3. 2 points
    Do you mean the castle like structure, that was built by the owner of a fruit and veg shop next door, I think in the 70's.
  4. 2 points
    Albert Jeffery, shopkeeper, 102 Walkley Road (Kelly's 1925). The building is still there https://goo.gl/maps/G3DA4Tzt93DC93DRA
  5. 2 points
    My mother use to take me and my sisters for our Whitsun tide clothes [once a year rig-out.] Most families used Banners cheques, just another way of paying weekly. Blanchards did a similar thing This is a painting of old Banners done by my brother.
  6. 1 point
    Came across this little gem today. Little Matlock, Loxley.
  7. 1 point
    The Fitzalan Square toilets were upgraded in 1901 but it was realised they were inadequate and for the next six years the council hummed and harr'd about where to build more town centre toilets. In July 1908 the invitation to tender was issued for "UNDERGROUND LAVATORIES and an UNDERGROUND TRAMWAY OFFICE, and the FORMATION OF A BALUSTRADED TERRACE IN FITZALAN SQUARE"
  8. 1 point
    The building attached to the Citadel and going around the corner into Pinstone Street and containing some shops and offices, was also part of the Salvation Army construction. (wonder if the Sally Army still own this block) Construction of the Citadel started around 1892! This dates the Picture Sheffield photograph to "c.1891"
  9. 1 point
    Just noticed this in The Halifax Guardian, May 24th, 1902.
  10. 1 point
    The toilet in the photo was the ladies, the men`s was on the opposite side facing Marple's, they both had separate exits and entrances, the photo shows the men`s entrance and exit on the right and left of the foreground.
  11. 1 point
    There used to be public conveniences under Fitzalan Square, so it could be the remains of those.
  12. 1 point
    Actor Roy Haywood explains that the police incident in this scene wasn't supposed to be in the film! The hole in the road scene was funny in respect that, Ken Loach told us to make a nuisance of ourselves. The policeman wasn't part of the script I remember saying to him we were making a film. He looked over at the camera and said to me "Oh sh*t, I'm sorry" then walked off. Ken Loach loved it and kept it in the film.
  13. 1 point
    It certainly is. The three windows on the left were sometimes decorated to illustrate a film. I heard that at the time of "Where Eagles Dare" there were models of cable cars there. Further down you can see two lights over the exits. The first was used as the Minors' entrance on a Saturday morning, and the exit from Screen 2. You can just make out the two illuminated poster boxes on the left. Across the road there is a bus waiting, sorry but I can't give any more details about the bus or its driver.
  14. 1 point
    Booth was an erstwhile Methodist...a denomination not noted for the decoration of it's churches . Early Puritans were responsible for whitewashing the interiors of Parish Churches... to remove wall paintings as well as removing all statues etc...especially after the Civil War when Puritanism ruled! The Methodists and other non-conformist denominations continued worshiping in very plain buildings. Booth's uniformed pseudo military organisation wears very plain dress, without ornamentation or embellishment...apart from epaulettes so I hardly see how an ornamental balcony ( out of keeping with Booth) would interest the majority of non worshiping Sheffielders when the Citadel was built.
  15. 1 point
    My Grandad was in their darts team in the sixties.I used to go in with him. or for him, to pay his tote in the late 70s and early 80s, but rarely stayed for more than a swift half. It never seemed a very friendly place. We used to go in the Mote Hall instead.
  16. 1 point
    I am working on that too. Some of the things I have put together are on Pinterest Sheffield Victoria Model and design I was also able to get some plans of the building. But I can't post them as they were drafted by someone on a Model Railway forum and when I bought them from him there was a condition not to post them online. Some people find blender easy to use. However I find the software very hard, especially if you are use to Desk Top Publishing or 2d drawing software. Blender does things just the opposite to these software packages.
  17. 1 point
    Frog and Parrot was named by previous landlord Roger Nowill, he actually kept a parrot in the bar. He was a bit of a character and was once seen on TV with the parrot.The pub was one of the first that brewed beer onsite including the famous Roger and Out, which has been well documented. This would have been early '80s. As far as I know, some of the brewing apparatus is still onsite, but unusable due to safety reasons (I think asbestos insulation)
  18. 1 point
    I lived just six doors away from the Steel Inn, the first landlord was Stan Redfern, if my my memory serves me right, he stayed a good few years then he moved to Cleethorpes to take a pub there. I moved from off the Manor when I was around twenty one or so, my brother was never out of the place but I can’t recall ever having a drink in the place, it was originally built without the concert room which was added at a later date. The building at the right of the pub was my doctor’s surgery.
  19. 1 point
    William Hutchinson certainly owned a lot of property: the 1864 Sheffield Flood damaged nineteen of his houses in Green Lane and Acorn Street! He was granted over £16 in compensation - quite generous compared to the paltry amounts some received. See https://www2.shu.ac.uk/sfca/claimDetails.cfm?claim=4-3865
  20. 1 point
    Smith's cleaners on the right
  21. 1 point
    I thought our readers might be interested in these wonderful Sheffield mugs from artist Alan Pennington Here's what Alan says about the mugs on his shop website Due to popular demand, I am pleased to offer a selection of Sheffield themed mugs which bear my artwork of iconic places in Sheffield. These modern and attractive mugs look great in any kitchen, either on their own or in sets of mixed or matching colours. Give your home some extra character and stand out from your friends & neighbours with these original, eye-catching mugs! PERFECT FOR: Housewarming Gift / Wedding Gift / Reminder of Home / Birthdays / Anniversary, Buy Now & Give Later. ★ High Quality Glazed Ceramic ★ Microwave & Dishwasher Safe ★ "I ♥ Sheffield" sign-off on front If you would like to own one of these brilliant iconic Sheffield mugs here is the link to the online shop - https://www.etsy.com/uk/listing/178707658/iconic-sheffield-mugs-alan-pennington
  22. 1 point
    A walk down Attercliffe to take a look at Banners building, The Adelphi Theatre, The Travellers Inn Pub and loads more to see how the place has changed..
  23. 1 point
    I think he got some from the demolition of some properties on Cuthbert Bank if you look at the building there is very little facing stone just the rubble from inner walls on stone faced buildings, he did a good job of it eventually.
  24. 1 point
    I was brought up in a post-war council house. The kitchen had a cast iron oven range that was heated by the fire in the living room, so there was no fire in the kitchen itself. Heat was controlled by a number of levers and dampers. Does anyone know what these were called or, even better, have a picture of one? (I don't mean the Yorkshire range with the fire in the kitchen).
  25. 1 point
    I remember the fella building this and some of the stone was delivered by us he was a shop owner from next door to the pub built as a potato store as I remember. Here's a bit of history for Robert Hales I took some years ago, Robert Hales - 7 feet 6 inches (228.6 cm) Robert Hales was born to William and Anne Hales on 2 May 1820, in the village of West Somerton near Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England. He was one of 9 children. Both his mother and his father were over 6 feet tall. His 5 sisters averaged about 6 feet 3 inches and his brothers averaged 6 feet 5 inches. However, one of his sisters (Mary Hales, later to become Mary Laskey) measured 7 feet 2 inches and another sister (Anne Hales, later to become Anne Laskey) measured only a few inches shorter than her sister Mary. Robert Hales grew to a height of 7 feet 8 inches tall. His weight was said to be over 32 stone and his chest measurment was 64 inches. Robert's father William was a farmer but Robert himself became a sailor. At the age of 13 he joined the navy, but when he was 17 years old he became to big. Robert Hales started to exhibit himself at the Tombland Fair in Norwich and the Brittannia Fair in Great Yarmouth. Later he joined his sister Mary and her manager/husband Joe Laskey. After Mary Laskey died at the age of 30, Joe Laskey married the sister Anne Laskey who was about 6 feet 8 inches tall. Robert did not agree to Joe marrying his other sister and the group parted. Robert Hales went to America where he met P.T. Barnum. Barnum signed him for his American Museum and Robert was exhibited in New York and was known as the Norfolk Giant. While with Barnum, he met and 'married' the giantess Eliza Simpson. He toured with Barnum for 2 years before he went back to England, tired of touring. He became the landlord of the Craven Head Tavern in Drury Lane in London. Robert Hales died in 1863 in Great Yarmouth and was burried in West Somerton.
  26. 1 point
    The 1855 Ordnance Survey map shows several wells in the area. https://maps.nls.uk/view/102345217?fbclid=IwAR3z8gxnQgm4tNDpfVEwxYqIOn0TofTuLSKgG1rvoAuc3GLeu4Vx3AmWj_c#zoom=6&lat=7681&lon=10406&layers=BT
  27. 1 point
    I liked the “Cuckoo” too, there’s a small area left which had a bench in it exactly where the pub stood, the old customers called it the Garden of Remembrance, the little area is till there but the bench has long been vandalised and removed. one customers complained about the crap beer one day, the landlords reply was “ tha’s only got a pint, I’ve got a cellar full”.
  28. 1 point
  29. 1 point
    A post here on that one ---
  30. 1 point
    I've had the pleasure of bumping into Patrick in town a couple of times and pleased to say that he stopped and chatted for considerable time on each occasion. Top man.
  31. 1 point
  32. 1 point
    JOIN OUR FiREWORKS CLUB
  33. 1 point
    There was previously a better pub a bit further down Pond Hill, the Lyceum, pictured on this thread by RLongden
  34. 1 point
    Not looking a lot different (in terms of land use) in 1890ish From old-maps.co.uk
  35. 1 point
  36. 1 point
    Tomlinson Joseph, jun. horse dealer, 66 Malinda Street. Kelly's 1881.
  37. 1 point
    White's 1879 66 Malinda Street - Tomlinson Jph. jun. cab proprietor White's 1901 66 Malinda Street - Batty Samuel, cowkeeper. By 1905 Mr Batty was listed as a carting contractor at the same address.
  38. 1 point
  39. 1 point
    Robert had a son called General age 12 in 1861 at the Burgoyne Arms.
  40. 1 point
    Quote: "Tracing the beginnings of the ‘fever’ leads us back a month earlier, when a Bicycle Club was hastily founded at Sharrow (near Wilson's Snuff factory), launched at a crowded Pomona Hotel, with hundreds gathered outside to see a velocipede contest, when the bicycle made by local firm Beck and Candlish of Brown Street was generally agreed superior to one imported from Pickering's of New York." Sharrow Cycling Club Football Team https://www.picturesheffield.com/s00129
  41. 1 point
  42. 1 point
    This is just a silly name made up by some marketing idiot, I always call it by it’s proper name the Prince of Wales, all old pubs had names that meant an event or a person etc. It’s on Devonshire Street by the way not West Street.
  43. 1 point
    Photo looking down the Wicker through the Wicker Arches railway bridge Great photo - not seen this one before
  44. 1 point
    I recognise the brick work and Boys Girls immediately, but can't remember where this was. I remember the 'Manual', which was for 3rd and 4th years to re-enter the building when a break was complete. (whistle blew) Mr Wilson was certainly still alive about 18months to 2 years ago, because I met someone who knew him Miss Carter was there at same time but never taught me, and can't remember what she looked like. Miss Holmes, I think had long black hair, but never taught me. The last 3 all taught me at some time.
  45. 1 point
    As promised here is a picture of the front of the Station Hotel on the Silver Jubilee day 1977 enjoy and can you see yourself
×
×
  • Create New...