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    Sheffield History

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 20/01/21 in all areas

  1. The time captured in one small paragraph, my Dad took me into the fish market on Saturday Afternoon for a plate of cockles or mussels, the place was heaving so I had to hold his hand all the time we were in there otherwise I could be swept along with the crowd, it was the only place I’ve ever seen a deer hung up ready to be butchered. All gone, Sheffield is a shadow of what it use to be, the Market is a poor substitute for what we lost. I hate the supermarkets, I would much rather see the small independent shops, grocers, butchers, green grocers, clothes shops, shoe shops, toy shops but their
    2 points
  2. I started work in 1955 at the Wicker Goods Station, Saville Street and can confirm that wagons such as these were still in very common use in the 50's. I also recall Bogies amongst them too - some I think were used by National Benzole petrol & oil company who were based at Lumley Street.
    2 points
  3. Generally speaking, they’re the only photographs you’ll ever see of that or with a particular exception,* any other ACTIVE court house/rooms in E&W as, I think, since the 1920s it’s against the law to use cameras inside them. That’s why you sometimes see the work of ‘court artists’ in high profile cases - producing artistic images of personalities involved in those cases though, personally, even that’s always seemed a dubious activity to me. Arguably, on the face of it, its a right and proper restriction if you think about it, as the results of casual or even some formal photography in wo
    1 point
  4. I remember Hemnings grocery shop on Holme Lane. There were boxes of biscuits along the front of the counter. Across the road on Middlewood Road was Styans a bread and cake shop.
    1 point
  5. I know this is from a few months ago but I've only just come across it. I worked at Ralstons for a couple of years in the early 70s. Hard, mucky work but have some good memories
    1 point
  6. A walk down town on a Saturday morning was a snapshot of life in its entirety. People everywhere. And you always bumped into someone you knew! Not like now ! Both my mum and dad worked on Saturday mornings so it was up to me to do a regular trip round the various bills to be paid......the estate agent in Norfolk Row for the rent, Burnett and Hallamshire in Change Alley to pay the coal bill, the YEB in Commercial Street and so on. Dodging the crowds, hearing the hawkers, the whine of the trams....absolute joy! Not so much fun when coal was in short supply, though. The wheelbarrow trip to
    1 point
  7. I've never been in so don't know whether the interior is (or has been) that austere, but the patterning of the glass that the bloke is peering over appears a close match to that at the Rivelin, Under Tofts.
    1 point
  8. I worked there for a coupleof years. The white boots were awful to wear. By the end of the night your feet were soaking wet because the boots were plastic. When I got home I took mine off and left them outside the back door because of the smell. Anybody remember one of the dancers....Linda Go Go
    1 point
  9. Full film up here on my vimeo alongside all other Sheffield Film Co-op titles https://vimeopro.com/alexglenwilson/sheffield-film-co-op digitised from original material with blessing of SF
    1 point
  10. I well recall, periodically, spending Saturday afternoons in BGs sumptuous tailors shop, shown here. I was only a kid, 10 or so but even at that tender age couldn’t but be impressed at premises ...the spaciousness of the place - big soft leather couches, piles of expensive ‘coffee table magazines’ which probably cost a chunk out of an average working persons wage, though mainly directed at men in those days, so no ‘Hellos’ or ‘Beanos’ for long - suffering wives and kids waiting for husband or dad to be measured up, fitted, or whatever. Tea, Coffee provide in a civilised way - NO confounded, v
    1 point
  11. Before it was built an appeal went out for funds. One offered the chance to "sponsor" a building block. My Church "sponsored" a couple. For the life of me I can't remember how much we paid but it was for a good cause!!!
    1 point
  12. Tinsley Park Cemetery. Twin spires at entrance, with stone cross at top of central drive and buildings in distance match Group huddled round grave = red arrow Jimmy by the skip with building in background = blue arrow Does that look right to anyone else?
    1 point
  13. There has been an Assay Office in Sheffield since 1773, when local silversmiths, who resented the inconvenience of having to send their wares to London for hallmarking, joined with Birmingham petitioners to ask Parliament for their own Offices. Despite fierce opposition from the London Goldsmiths' Company, an Act of Parliament was passed, granting Sheffield the right to assay silver. Because the Select Committee which considered the petition had uncovered so many abuses by the existing Assay Offices, Parliament made sure that the new ones were more strictly controlled. The Act appointed t
    1 point
  14. Hard to believe we had at least two hospitals dedicated to chest diseases and a full time mass X Ray centre in Ellin St at the bottom of The Moor. (Winter St hospital; King Edwards, Rivelin and I seem to recall there was a dedicated chest unit somewhere around Queens Road/ Olive Grove area but also Nether Edge Hospital, Fir Vale and Lodge Moor all had chest units. My own father died of lung cancer in Lodge Moor.)
    1 point
  15. The only happier times I can remember are before Park Square Roundabout was built 😉 !!
    1 point
  16. Travel back in time to happier times, for a happy sunny walk from Park Square roundabout to Pond Street bus station!
    1 point
  17. It was a beerhouse (on licensed) at the time of the auction referenced and until it's demise. I can't say definitively what happened to the licence at present (it falls within ongoing research), but can suggest a probable chain of events. The long term licensee left in 1880 and is known to have run other premises after that date. It is likely that he transfered out close to the time the property came up for let in the middle of the year, however, by September, when fixtures and fittings were advertised for sale, he was named as seller. The sale in itself doesn't necesarily indicate closure (i
    1 point
  18. Not sure about "Her parents were called Robert and Edith (nee Bowen)." and born 1887? Edith was born 15th of either Jan, Feb, Mar, Apr 1889. The 1939 Register is badly written and transcribed. Edith's birth was registered in quarter 2 1889 her mothers maiden name was Lee, she was baptised at Carbrook on 15th May 1889, daughter of Robert and Sarah Ann Laver. Edith's marriage certificate age agrees - she was 26 in 1915. Her father Robert Laver married her mother Sarah Ann Lee at Wath-upon-Dearne on 14th October 1872 - he was a widowed coalmine engine tender, son of Thomas Laver, als
    1 point
  19. Great views from Smithcroft Wood / Shirecliffe Allotments. Brought back memories of the later 40's when the "White Bridge" was a popular vantage point to see the steam trains slogging up to Penistone, and to get a free long distance view of the Speedway on match nights! A further frame to the right would have revealed another popular spectator venue
    1 point
  20. I was a barman at the railway for a time. Was a great traditional pub with plenty of characters.
    1 point
  21. As a sufferer of Acrophobia I can’t even imagine living in the business end of a high rise building. It’s nothing to do with council accommodation, I would feel just the same in a multi million pound penthouse, remember Richard Gere in Pretty Woman with Julia Roberts all but hanging over his penthouse balcony and him attempting to melt into wall farest from it, well other than for the Julia Roberts deficiency, that was me to a tee. I’ve often wondered if folk with my fears are identified by the council prior to being housed in such buildings, in the private housing market it’s easy, don’t
    1 point
  22. My grandparents and other relatives are buried in St Thomas' and I've visited several times. There has never been any problem except the amount of brambles and ivy covering parts of the graveyard. I'd suggest wearing long sleeved gardening gear, heavy boots, heavy duty gloves and taking secateurs and long handled cutters. You can park on the site near the building, or plenty by the side of the road. One relative was the twelfth burial in the graveyard, one grave away from the church wall and despite having a copy of the plan (pasted inside the front cover of the register), I've still not fo
    1 point
  23. Right on the corner where Subway stands now (at the time of writing)
    1 point
  24. The Sunshine Shop on Orchard Street / Orchard Place
    1 point
  25. There are some new photo's added to Picture Sheffield showing the construction of the road bridge over the Midland railway line. The first shows the scene before work, the next the bridge supports installed, the third built, with cars - the support clearly visible from the previous photo and the last shows putting in the girders to take the road.
    1 point
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