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  1. tozzin

    tozzin

    Sheffield History Member


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      1,352


  2. Calvin72

    Calvin72

    Sheffield History Member


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      5

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      649


  3. Jim2000

    Jim2000

    Sheffield History Member


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      3

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      48


  4. Sheffield History

    Sheffield History

    Sheffield History Team


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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 30/05/20 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    I could never understand, in fact I still don’t, as to why the council allowed the destruction of all the old Victorian shops on Pinstone Street including the Cambridge Arcade, then add insult to injury allow the horrible buildings that were put up in their place. Thanks to picture Sheffield.
  2. 3 points
    Hello All, I'm delighted to say that I have been shortlisted for European Heritage Storyteller of the Year for 'Drainspotting'. The link here is the just published submission which formed the final part of the process. There are now just 20 stories left in the contest (of which I am one) and the final 10 are announced later this month. Hopefully there will more updates to follow but thank you very much to all the people who contributed to this long running thread which was part of my story and supporting evidence https://www.europeanheritagedays.com/Story/cfbd0/Drainspotting-%40%40%40-A-European-Story%2c-Made-in-Sheffield^^^
  3. 3 points
    Came across this little gem today. Little Matlock, Loxley.
  4. 2 points
    The Fitzalan Square toilets were upgraded in 1901 but it was realised they were inadequate and for the next six years the council hummed and harr'd about where to build more town centre toilets. In July 1908 the invitation to tender was issued for "UNDERGROUND LAVATORIES and an UNDERGROUND TRAMWAY OFFICE, and the FORMATION OF A BALUSTRADED TERRACE IN FITZALAN SQUARE"
  5. 2 points
    The building attached to the Citadel and going around the corner into Pinstone Street and containing some shops and offices, was also part of the Salvation Army construction. (wonder if the Sally Army still own this block) Construction of the Citadel started around 1892! This dates the Picture Sheffield photograph to "c.1891"
  6. 2 points
    Just back from one of my regular walks in the General Cemetery where I unexpectedly found the grave of Charles Ross. I'm interested in him as his name appears all over Sheffield's pavements. The firm made coal hole covers, tramway features, and more. Strangely I've found only one drain cover of his (just off Thompson Road at the bottom of the Botanical Gardens) which is in the c.1900-10 style.
  7. 1 point
    In Leeds there are streets and streets of buildings like this in everyday use
  8. 1 point
    Next door down the road at No. 21 was a Sheffield United Tours office and garage. Quite a tight fit getting coaches in and out, I would imagine, looking at the entrance and the shape of the yard behind.
  9. 1 point
    Everything left of the long cottage (Blue) has gone. Cottage at rear (Green) is now Williams builders, but with chimney stacks reduced. Cottages scrubbed out in red are where new Cross Scythes entrance, frontage and car park are now..... I’ve had my crayons out 😁👍
  10. 1 point
    A great list of acts but a few misssed . We also were fortunate to be entertained by: * Hernans Hermits * The Hollies * Charles Aznavour * The Batchelors * Freddie & The Dreamers * The Four Seasons ( twice) * Dave Allen * Kenny Rodgers & The First Edition * Roy Orbison * Lovelace Watkins
  11. 1 point
    original photo with answer in the caption: https://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s18424&pos=49&action=zoom&id=21002 looking from the opposite direction: https://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s18414&pos=48&action=zoom&id=20993 Cross Scythes now in shot on the left: https://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s14868&pos=47&action=zoom&id=17666 Cross Scythes now centre of shot, with original view up the lane, behind the gas lamp: https://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s14867&pos=46&action=zoom&id=17665
  12. 1 point
    Forgot to add, while Agnes Henderson (nee Hengler) was lodging on Sidney Street in 1861, her equestrian brother John Michael Hengler is lodging at 99 Duke Street, alongside John Henry Cooke (1836-1917), who would be billed as ‘the Champion Equestrian of the Universe’, born in New York.
  13. 1 point
    In 1848 Britain’s first black circus-owner and horse-riding performer Mr Pablo Fanque (formerly of Astley’s Circus) and his ‘Talented Troup of Equestrians’ delighted crowds at the Adelphi Theatre, Blonk Street, dressed in 'Sumptuous Attire'. Great acts brought novelty to the town - including, it seems, one of its first interracial marriages... Having been some days in preparation, a splendid time was guaranteed for all at High Bradfield Church in June 1848, where the same Mr Pablo had changed into his wedding suit, tying the knot with Elizabeth Corker, daughter of publicans George and Martha Corker of the Wicker’s Bull and Oak. Plenty of refreshments for the guests, no doubt, being for the benefit of Mr Kite and other circus companions, and the Hendersons would ‘all be there’: Agnes Henderson (née Hengler) and John Henderson, who, according to Pablo’s Circus Royal posters, would let nothing stand in his way: Over Men & Horses, through Hoops, over Garters and lastly through a Hogshead of REAL FIRE! By the next year Pablo Fanque and his company brought an ‘Extraordinary and Classical’ Royal Amphitheatre spectacular to Blonk Street: Royal Ampitheatre, Cattle-market.- This establishment, which has of late been known as the Adelphi Theatre, has been undergoing extensive alterations, under the superintendence of Mr Pablo Fanque....the performances, whether equestrian, gymnastic, or Samsonian, gave the greatest satisfaction... (The Era, 2 December 1849). In the winter-attired audience, missing no opportunity for publicity, were the Levys (tailors and outfitters of High Street); Whose Coats and whose Vests, are as varied and rare, As the talent which Pablo and Company do share. And as for an Overcoat, we are sure you’ll find none Which surpasses, for beauty, those of Levy and Son. (A Visit to Pablo’s, Sheffield Independent 1849) The English ‘General Tom Thumb’ (who lived at the Burgoyne Arms in the 1860s; see posts on this site) was reportedly a guest act at Pablo’s later performances. Pablo Fanque (real name William Darby) died in 1871 and is buried at Leeds.
  14. 1 point
    Agnes Henderson (Sidney Street 1861) - her maiden name was Agnes Hengler, from the family of the popular Hengler’s Circus, who made frequent visits to Sheffield. Hengler’s suffered a tragedy here in Agnes’ lifetime - in 1872 when a gallery (for spectators) fell. See fascinating extract from https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=p5wMYvBVGgIC&printsec=frontcover&dq=The+circus+and+Victorian+society&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwinqsLE6ufpAhVdSBUIHSA7DvIQ6AEIJTAA#v=onepage&q=The circus and Victorian society&f=false
  15. 1 point
    From a similar view point in August 2019. Not a lot can be seen thanks to the trees, which is a shame as there has been much change (to put it mildly)
  16. 1 point
    These plans have been approved - A bar/restaurant with open terrace
  17. 1 point
    I contacted Amey in 2014 about the state of the boundary marker on Convent Walk, it was in an appalling condition and needed restoring, the photo shows the result. Not much care shown using green paint on the lettering but its better than the rust that covered it before.
  18. 1 point
    It was so designed to represent an army "citadel" ( OED...a fortress protecting or overlooking a city)
  19. 1 point
    The “Wedding Cake” I thought was a horrible building, this is the Registrar Office that was demolished in the name of progress, I know which one I prefer.
  20. 1 point
    The view from Jenkin Road in 1962.
  21. 1 point
    The buildings also shown on the plan were also built by the Salvation Army . The building on the extreme left is the Yorkshireman public house.
  22. 1 point
    Great aerial shots! The architect certainly went to town with the design of the roof on the Pinstone Street building, dormers, turrets and chimneys, a bit of a challenge for the plumber installing the lead work to weather seal the different roofing shapes.
  23. 1 point
    The building was completed in 1894 and alterations made in 1950. The building is grade 2 listed.
  24. 1 point
    Just noticed this in The Halifax Guardian, May 24th, 1902.
  25. 1 point
    The toilet in the photo was the ladies, the men`s was on the opposite side facing Marple's, they both had separate exits and entrances, the photo shows the men`s entrance and exit on the right and left of the foreground.
  26. 1 point
    There used to be public conveniences under Fitzalan Square, so it could be the remains of those.
  27. 1 point
    Actor Roy Haywood explains that the police incident in this scene wasn't supposed to be in the film! The hole in the road scene was funny in respect that, Ken Loach told us to make a nuisance of ourselves. The policeman wasn't part of the script I remember saying to him we were making a film. He looked over at the camera and said to me "Oh sh*t, I'm sorry" then walked off. Ken Loach loved it and kept it in the film.
  28. 1 point
    It certainly is. The three windows on the left were sometimes decorated to illustrate a film. I heard that at the time of "Where Eagles Dare" there were models of cable cars there. Further down you can see two lights over the exits. The first was used as the Minors' entrance on a Saturday morning, and the exit from Screen 2. You can just make out the two illuminated poster boxes on the left. Across the road there is a bus waiting, sorry but I can't give any more details about the bus or its driver.
  29. 1 point
    Booth was an erstwhile Methodist...a denomination not noted for the decoration of it's churches . Early Puritans were responsible for whitewashing the interiors of Parish Churches... to remove wall paintings as well as removing all statues etc...especially after the Civil War when Puritanism ruled! The Methodists and other non-conformist denominations continued worshiping in very plain buildings. Booth's uniformed pseudo military organisation wears very plain dress, without ornamentation or embellishment...apart from epaulettes so I hardly see how an ornamental balcony ( out of keeping with Booth) would interest the majority of non worshiping Sheffielders when the Citadel was built.
  30. 1 point
    My Grandad was in their darts team in the sixties.I used to go in with him. or for him, to pay his tote in the late 70s and early 80s, but rarely stayed for more than a swift half. It never seemed a very friendly place. We used to go in the Mote Hall instead.
  31. 1 point
    I am working on that too. Some of the things I have put together are on Pinterest Sheffield Victoria Model and design I was also able to get some plans of the building. But I can't post them as they were drafted by someone on a Model Railway forum and when I bought them from him there was a condition not to post them online. Some people find blender easy to use. However I find the software very hard, especially if you are use to Desk Top Publishing or 2d drawing software. Blender does things just the opposite to these software packages.
  32. 1 point
    I lived just six doors away from the Steel Inn, the first landlord was Stan Redfern, if my my memory serves me right, he stayed a good few years then he moved to Cleethorpes to take a pub there. I moved from off the Manor when I was around twenty one or so, my brother was never out of the place but I can’t recall ever having a drink in the place, it was originally built without the concert room which was added at a later date. The building at the right of the pub was my doctor’s surgery.
  33. 1 point
    It’s recently gone but the palm tree at Walkley always suggests a cocktail bar Leopold square when it was a proper old school local. miss it massively.
  34. 1 point
    Great thread this one!
  35. 1 point
    Hi Folks, This post is now available as a podcast, if that is your kind of thing! Link to listen here - http://smarturl.it/MyLifeInTheMosh Here are Ray and The Push in Mr. Kite's Wine Bar, photo by Pete Hill. Thanks Dodger
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