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  1. Edmund

    Edmund

    Sheffield History Member


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      1,743


  2. Stu_1981

    Stu_1981

    Sheffield History Member


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      6

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      57


  3. Leipzig

    Leipzig

    Sheffield History Member


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      4

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      8


  4. SteveHB

    SteveHB

    Sheffield History Admin


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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 15/07/20 in Posts

  1. 3 points
    A few bits from 1926 newspapers for those interested:
  2. 2 points
    I've been having a chortle at a couple of advertisments on the television at the moment. One of them is for the "New Electric Mini". This puts me in mind of an old "Electric Mini" that I rode about in back in about 1967. This was a prototype made by AEI (Associated Electrical Industries) and was taken on a tour around AEI factories in the UK including the one I worked at. It comprises of a BMC Mini Van which had the petrol engine replaced by a AEI V66 milk float motor. The flat platform in the back of the van was loaded with large lead-acid batteries supplying 72 volts. The motor speed controller was a very low tech arrangement called a "Chopper Controller" which switched the power supply on and off rapidly. It used Thyristors which were the only high power semiconductors available at the time. This controller made a very loud high pitched whine in operation. I believe that the EU want electric vehicles to be fitted with artificial engine noise devices for safety reasons. This prototype could have been heard from a mile away. The other advert that causes me amusement is for an insurance company that specialised in agricultural cover and has now branched out into household cover. It makes a big thing about new for old cover and shows a chap bringing in a replacement telly, The box he carries it in is marked 42 inch OLED television. Unfortunately the box is only about 2 feet long. It must be an inflate-able model like some of these modern mattresses that come in a tiny box until you pull it out. Daft I know but I do think they ought to have thought that one out better. It doesn't take much to amuse me these days. hilldweller Postscript. Further to the above I've been Googling and found a reference to the car. My memory isn't as good as I thought and the car was a BMC Mini Traveller. (A minivan with windows). If you google AEI V66 vehicle motor there's a link to it. The motor was in fact a V67 and the top speed 41 mph. It was produced by BMC on some sort of research grant I think. There's even a photo of it. hilldweller. s
  3. 2 points
    She's probably got four kids and an arse like a hippopotamus now....move on.
  4. 2 points
    Hi Heartshome and syrup, thank you for your replies. My knowledge of the object in the photo is only the same as anyone else's who looks at it I'm afraid. Personally I think it is a Dromedary camel, but that is only my impression and a differing opinion from another person may be equally correct. The only thing I would say is that generally speaking, someone creating a sculpture of this sort would tend to enhance the qualities of the object they were sculpturing, and personally I don't think that a strong proud hunting dog would have been depicted with any sort of humped back. However as I say that is only my impression, and I could easily be wrong. I have googled trade marks for Johnson Cammell & co, Charles Cammell, and Cammell Laird & Co Ltd and most of the images for the trade marks depict a Bactrian camel (two humps) and not a Dromedary camel (one hump). However I found at least two references to the Charles Cammell trademark below, which is a Dromedary Camel. However I still look at the puzzle with an open mind as I do not want to go down the route of trying to make the evidence fit a preconceived solution as it were. Thanks again Leipzig
  5. 2 points
    Most houses were lucky to have a water closet in the yard, privies were still predominant (let alone indoor water closets). As late as 1926 1,820 Sheffield privies were converted to water closets, which certainly didn't have a stack pipe or vent. This number of conversions was about average for the period from 1904, though numbers fell to virtually nil during the war. The council changed its policy in 1919 - prior to the war they allowed one wc to two houses. This policy change meant that an additional 5,000 wcs would be provided (1,000 conversions and 4,000 additional). The council did the work but were not allowed to contribute to the cost.
  6. 2 points
    If you look at modern houses you will see that the waste pipes to all toilets have what is called a stack pipe that goes right up to the roof area open at the top. This allows air to get into the sewer system. And stops sewer gas going into your house.
  7. 2 points
    I've just discovered what the "rp" on Ordnance Survey maps means - revision point. In the 1940s the Survey took photos of selected points to make cross referral of new mappings easier. Some of the photos have been re-discovered and put on-line. The only ones for Sheffield are those taken in Attercliffe. For example: Revision Points discussion Attercliffe Revision Points
  8. 2 points
    Here's the newspaper account of Samuel's fatal accident
  9. 2 points
  10. 2 points
    With reference to the Coins found in The Olive Branch that were proved to be Medieval, here is a case of counterfeit coins. Sheffield Daily Telegraph 02 June 1866
  11. 1 point
    Wow, you must be reading my mind SteveHB as that was going to be my next pic which I took last week. The building was covered in scaffolding and was half gone when I cycled past today.
  12. 1 point
    Ash Farm Contents up for Auction. Sheffield Independent 24 February 1883
  13. 1 point
    41 mph. hilldweller , a bit slow but probably a bit safer than this one. Personally I doubt I will ever take to one, I can't help associating them with the milk floats I drove over 50 years ago, As for the TV I doubt a modern advertising executive knows what an inch is, ----------------------- La Jamais Contente “The car in which you travel seems to leave the ground and hurl itself forward like a projectile ricocheting along the ground. As for the driver, the muscles of his body and neck become rigid in resisting the pressure of the air; his gaze is steadfastly fixed about 200 yards ahead; his senses are on the alert.” That’s what inventor, racer, and pilot of La Jamais Contente (The Never Satisfied) said of the experience driving his creation to speeds in excess of 100 km/h (62 mph)—the first man-made machine to do so. And it is electric ------------------------------ A few more here ------ https://petrolicious.com/articles/unplug-and-hang-on-five-interesting-vintage-electric-cars
  14. 1 point
    Ive walked over that bridge loads!
  15. 1 point
    I lived at 62 Cawdor Rd from 1957 - 1976 at the junction of Cawdor Rd & Errington Rd , the Arbourthorne hotel was right on the T junction mr Drabble was the landlord for quite a while, then Mr Pickering who at whitsuntide used to throw hot penny’s off the balcony to all the kids dressed in their whitsun best packed below. the shortcuts shop used to be a general grocery owned by Roger Taylor (no not the tennis plaster) his wife had a hairdressers off the access road around the back the north east quadrant was the bookies the chemist and the chippy the south east was the post office run by Trevor Taylor I was the paperboy spare lad, doing my own round & picking up any other round that didn’t turn up the south east Quadrant Fruiters never had anything best to it that I knew of, but there was a track at the back of it running parallel with Errington Rd up to east bank Rd and was the garages
  16. 1 point
    This one's been closed for a few years now, The Old Harrow at the bottom of Duke Street.
  17. 1 point
    HI all. I went to Tapton in the 60's. a lifetime ago. Rob Porter
  18. 1 point
    The oldest directory I have access to which includes Brightside Lane is 1879. There are no odd-numbered properties on Brightside Lane. However, on maps from the 1850s and 1860s what is now Brightside Lane is named as Bent Lane, and there is a Brightside Lane which heads north-east from Brightside village alongside the river. This later became Meadow Hall Road. https://maps.nls.uk/view/102345199#zoom=5&lat=1356&lon=2504&layers=BT Pure guesswork, but i wonder if 5 Brightside Lane in the early 1870s was somewhere near Brightside Bridge, perhaps one of the row of houses seen in the map extract below next to Naseby Street. Later maps show this row as 1-11 Meadow Hall Road - were they 1-11 Brightside Lane before the roads were renamed? https://www.old-maps.co.uk/#/Map/438496/390523/12/100392
  19. 1 point
    I know a few doctors socially and in wide ranging discussions I have never heard any suggestion that they have been taught that black people feel pain differently!.
  20. 1 point
    History is there to be learned from. Several million men, women, and children were abducted, killed tortured and raped in order to build Empires. To be able to escape from the obvious immorality, people have been taught that African people and others from colonies are not the same as us. Black women still have problems getting medical help because doctors have been taught that Black women feel pain differently. So it lives on. The lesson from the obscenity that was slavery is how easy it was for ordinary people to be comfortable and accepting about the unacceptable whether it be UK, USA, Belgium, France, Netherlands, Spain or Australia to name but a few. Till Racism is gone we cannot move on.
  21. 1 point
    I have picked up in my studies another person involved in the slave trade who lived in Sheffield and became rich from it and that was Edward Bennet, who lived in Coal Pit Lane and who built a sugar refinery. His sugar came from Liverpool, but he is also listed as an investor in a slaving ship along with Thomas Staniforth. His became a preacher and built a Chapel at the same time he was importing sugar from Liverpool. His father was an early Methodist and friends with Whitefield one of the leading abolitionists. So one wonders what the conversations were like in their family. When Edward died his estate went to George Bennet who became a clergyman, a missionary and an abolitionist and was a founder member of the Sunday school movement in 1813 together with James Montgomery. It is said that George Bennet was a big influence on Mary Ann Rawson, of Attercliffe and Wincobank.
  22. 1 point
    SHEFFIELD CITY TOUR - The Moor to Sheffield Town Hall SHEFFIELD CITY TOUR - The Moor to Sheffield Town Hall Watch it here on our new Videos section 👉 SHEFFIELD CITY TOUR - The Moor to Sheffield Town Hall
  23. 1 point
    Keep hoping my friend, someone may surprise you one day. Best wishes Heartshome.
  24. 1 point
    Sheffield Tour : Crucible Theatre to Sheffield Winter Gardens to Sheffield Town Hall Sheffield Tour : Crucible Theatre to Sheffield Winter Gardens to Sheffield Town Hall Watch it here on our new Videos section 👉 Sheffield Tour : Crucible Theatre to Sheffield Winter Gardens to Sheffield Town Hall
  25. 1 point
    Hi Heartshome Good find. If only my ancestors had been able to invest in a bit better camera equipment (presuming it was one of them who took the photo) we would have a clearer idea of what exactly the animal was, but I suspect we will never know for sure, but thanks for your input, it is appreciated. It was one of those things where realistically I didn't expect to solve my puzzle, but would have always regretted not having tried, by posting the photo on the site. My hope was that someone might have had a memory of a camel sculpture being in the area around the time of the photo, a camel perhaps being a bit rare, that was my thinking. Regards Leipzig
  26. 1 point
    Hia, comparing the image ! See = Amazon Uk Fiesta Studio's Harriet Glen's Greyhound Lying Down Cold Cast Bronze sculpture
  27. 1 point
    Thanks for the video, very enlightening to me who hasn't seen Sheffield for many years. I suppose I am just an old fogey and younger people may disagree but to me they have made a real pig's ear of The Moor and many other parts of Sheffield. Concrete and glass is not the Sheffield I loved.
  28. 1 point
    Reminded me of my uncle in Egypt, one hump (dromedary) camel
  29. 1 point
    Hoping for assistance please! I'm looking for any information about Grove House on Barnsley Road. It was briefly mentioned in the post at: The occupant in 1833 was William Wilkinson (gent) as listed in the White's Directory. William had inherited Crowder House some years previously, but the Crowder estate was rented out (advertisement in the ‘Independent’ in 1831), probably to George Barrett, cattle dealer etc. Barrett went bankrupt in 1841 and his unpaid rent meant that William had to mortgage the freehold of Crowder House to Thomas James Parker, William remaining as a tenant for life. In 1851 the land (57 acres) was being farmed by Mira, the eldest of William’s daughters, living at Crowder with 2 of her sisters, while her brother Walter was manufacturing shears in Sheffield. On William’s death in 1854 he left Longley Bottom House and its orchard to his widow Sarah (who would die in 1860). In May 1855 the family were dispossessed of the Crowder part of William's estate under an action of ejectment initiated by Parker and others. Bernard Wake then bought the estate from Parker by public auction on 2nd February 1857. There was ill-feeling between the Wilkinsons and the Wakes - reported in newspaper articles in August 1857 and February 1858 regarding court cases of apple stealing, trespass and boundary disputes. I've looked at some old maps of the Barnsley Road area for Grove House, with no luck - possibly not old enough?. Any info would be much appreciated!
  30. 1 point
    A report by Historic England is available by this link (though it doesn't answer your question): Historic England POW Camp Report Excerpt: Each Prisoner of War camp was allocated an official number during World War II within a prescribed numerical sequence, ranging from Camp 1 (Grizedale Hall, Ambleside) through to Camp1026 (Raynes Park, Wimbledon). This numbering sequence has posed problems for the assessment as some sites have different numbers at different dates (Quorn Camp, Leicestershire – Camp 9 and Camp 183), the same camp number can be used for different locations (Camp 17 – Lodge Moor Camp, Sheffield, and 22 Hyde Park Gardens, London) and some sites have a letter suffix rather than a distinctly different number (Camp 139b Coxhoe Hall, County Durham). Without further documentary research it is hard to tell whether the inconsistencies in the numbering system were the result of a deliberate policy, or of the fluidity of the situation. There is certainly documentation held in The National Archives to show that the British were unwilling to release the location of Prisoner of War camps to the Germans due to the fear of possible paratroop raids to release them. The Germans on the other hand indicated that they were seeking the information to ensure that they did not bomb the camps by mistake. The Sheffield Camps in this report were: Ref 17 Lodge Moor Camp, Redmires Road, Base Camp Pre-First World War army camp. Capacity substantially increased by the provision of tented accomodation. Guarded by double wire perimeter fences and watch towers. Footings and perimeter wall remain extant Ref 127 Potter's Hill, High Green, German Working Camp See Camp no.296 Ref 248 Norton Camp, Cinderhill Lane, Norton, German Precise location not identified, NGR Sheffield Working Camp given for approx feature centre of Cinderhill lane. Ref 296 Potter's Hill, High Green, German Working Camp See Camp no.127 (Ref 296 Ravensfield Park Camp, Rotherham Farmland) The journal here: Forces Postal History Journal states that camp 701 was "non communique". Multiple 701's here: According to an Italian person tracking the movements of POW relative, they were moved from Lodge Moor to camp 701. So possibly it was a local temporary transit camp, used as a staging point on their way home?
  31. 1 point
    Yes I used it regularly ,I used to live just below the punch bowl, on Durlstone drive
  32. 1 point
    A bigger picture would help, but from memory of other photos I think the chimneys are those on the station building.
  33. 1 point
    Here's a view inside the King's Head, Change Alley, taken June 1902. The photographer was Henry Bedford of Bedford Lemere And Company, and the photo was taken for Seligman and Mackay (Sheffield) Ltd, hotel proprietors who owned the Kings Head. and the smoking room: more photos here: Kings Head Change Alley
  34. 1 point
    Death announcement for the Widow of Samuel Kirkby , The Times 1872.
  35. 1 point
  36. 1 point
    hello is there any more pictures used to love this pub back in the day
  37. 1 point
    Samuel was dead by 1828 when his eldest daughter married. His wife (unfortunately only referred to as Mrs Kirkby) died in 1832 at Askern, near Doncaster, where she had gone to benefit from the mineral springs. Their eldest daughter was Marianne, who married Samuel Scholefield of Spring Head Hall, Hull, by licence on 28th December 1828 at St Peters, Sheffield. The licence stated that she was 21. Their 2nd daughter was Sarah, who married Charles Appleby (of the firm Walker, Wilde & Co, steel converters) by licence at St Peters on 24th April 1828. In 1841 they were living at "The Mount" Broomhill. Their daughter Emily married William Alexander Esq. M.D. on 4th October 1837 by licence at Scalby near Scarborough. In 1851 they were living with her sister Eliza and husband in Halifax. William died aged 81 in April 1888 at Blackwall, Halifax. Their daughter Eliza married Gervase Alexander M.D. by licence at St Luke's, Liverpool on 13th October 1838. The Alexanders were a Scottish family with claims to the Barony of Burgh and the Barony of Strabolgi. In 1851 they were living at Blackwall, Halifax with sister Emily and her husband. Eliza died on 10th January 1882, by then the widow of Gervase, at Victoria Road, Sheffield. Their youngest daughter Ellinor (or Eleanor) married Henry Roberts M.D. of Paradise Street Birmingham, by licence at Scalby near Scarborough on 13th October 1835. She was stated to be 23. Samuel's youngest son Edward, living in Manchester, married Anne Holwell, the daughter of the Reverend Laurence Short, rector of Ashbourne. They married on 7th May 1836 at Bishop's Court, Kirk Michael on the Isle of Man (his name is mistranscribed as Kirkley). In 1851 they were living at East View, Broomhill Sheffield where Edward was a 42 year old wine and spirit merchant. Samuel's other son, also Samuel, born about 1795, married Sophia (possibly Whitehead, at St Mary's Lambeth on 30th August or 2nd September 1837, Samuel was stated to reside at "The Elm" Sheffield. Sophia was the 3rd surviving daughter of Alexander Whitehead, Secretary to his Majesty's Transport Board.) In 1851 Samuel and Sophia were living at Ballagh, IoM, Samuel was a 56 year old "gentleman by annuity". Samuel died on the Isle of Man aged 61 on 8th December 1855. Sophia died the widow of Samuel late of Grove House, Sheffield at Osborne Terrace, Douglas, Isle of Man on 23rd January 1872 aged 69.
  38. 1 point
    Here is the sale information that @Edmund mentioned above. It seems that Samuel's wife (Sarah) had left Grove House the year before she died.
  39. 1 point
    A few newspaper clippings for you here @Milicent. They should help with narrowing down dates as it appears that Samuel died pre-1828. His wife died in 1832.
  40. 1 point
    There is a history of Spring Hill Crookes at the following link https://www.chrishobbs.com/sphill.htm that may help resolve a couple of the issues raised
  41. 1 point
  42. 1 point
    Some good reading for me there syrup, thanks for taking the time to find those documents. I do know that Robert Chapmans mother - Margery Green, was married previously, obviously to a Chapman, but I believe this husband died. She then took in a lodger, (Thomas Green?), and ended up marrying him (as per your document) and having further children. The family story goes that his mother Marjery Green (or possibly one of her daughters) whilst a child lived in Alnwick Northumberland, and whilst trying to use the village water pump a finely dressed gentleman on horseback approached. She asked the gent if he could help work the pump for her, which he did. As she walked away she was told by locals that the gent was non other than the Duke of Northumberland and how dare she make him pump water for her 😀 Apparently the pump is still there today..
  43. 1 point
    Hi there, My name's Tony. Was born in Sheffield early 1940 in Heeley. Went to Anns Road School and then Rowlinson (with a spell at Carrfield whilst Rowlinson was being completed) First job at Wicker Goods Station, Saville street. In the cutlery trade for most of my remaining working life as a Grinder. I love the old Sheffield that I knew as a child / teenager and young married man and, for the most part, hate the changes which have been made in the name of progress. When did progress come to mean getting worse instead of getting better?
  44. 1 point
    Wow, thats brilliant, i really appreciate you finding this for me. PC Chapman was my grandfathers uncle. My grandfather also became a police officer in Rotherham, then Sheffield and then South Yorkshire Police until he retired in 1976. Its nice to be able to find something out about PC Chapman, as all my grandfather knew was he had died 'coming off duty'. Thanks again. I now need to find a census for that year to see what house number Park Street he lived at. I see that Park Street is still there in Higher Broughton, Salford
  45. 1 point
    Hi all. I have written a biographical piece on my great-great grandfather, PC Thomas Clifford of Derbyshire Constabulary, who was posted to the area of Sheffield's border with Derbyshire in the early 1880s. This has now been published online, as a freely downloadable pdf document, by Derbyshire Family History Society (DFHS). The piece is 82 pages with as many period images, and takes about two hours to read. Many members of the community which PC Clifford patrolled were culters, and others wandered down from the city to drink in the pubs over the border. I therefore devote a significant amount of space to them. In case anyone has any use for links to the pdf, such as adding to a web page or sharing in other ways: The page where DFHS have placed the link to open the pdf - https://www.dfhs.org.uk/member_downloads.php?catid=6 Direct link for the pdf itself - https://www.dfhs.org.uk/filestore/PC_Thomas_Clifford_1880-85_110.pdf To navigate from the DFHS homepage, select 'Data & Downloads', then 'Downloads Area', and the link 'PC Clifford' appears under 'File categories (Public)'; this opens the page on which the link to the pdf appears I lived in Brimington on the north edge of Chesterfield in the mid-1990s when I worked in Sheffield, just off Ecclesall Road. Best wishes, John Clifford
  46. 1 point
    This has been a very useful site for the many years I have been a member. I was born in Page Hall & had family in Grimesthorpe & Petre St. Lived in Sheffield until 1976 when my job with British Steel moved me up to Teesside where I live in Guisborough. Still bhave family & friends in Sheffield so visit a few times a year. Have been heavily involved in family history resserach for 25 years & have used facilities at Sheffield Archives & Local Studies Library many times. I still love the city I grew up in and find its history fascinating. Many thanks to the admins who have done a great job over the years keeping this site available.
  47. 1 point
    I am proud to be an indigenous Sheffielder.I love the Sheffield of old (for me).Sheffield in the 50s-70s were a reight place.Its lost some of its character na but we need to rekindle the metal in Sheffield’s blood.I love looking at t’owd pictures and reading the stories etc.
  48. 1 point
    Small world! Although I am now, a long long way from there, I used to live at 21 ( next door ). 1952 to 1964. as a child.. "Auntie Bet " used to give me a boiled sweet FISH from her sweet jar at least once a week.. She was an absolute gem. Alf too, was a real gent and I remember him always making the effort to wear his suit on most days of the week. He died whilst I was still at Junior school but Mrs G carried on like the cheerful trooper she always was. There were no other residents at #19 Jan.. Strange, but as a grandchild to them, you would think I would have remembered you on any visitation? Sadly, I cannot.. There was the occasional friend or relative who used to visit by car ( an old black Ford, sit up and beg type ).. I only noticed your posting today 15/03/18 as I have just joined the forum to see if I can tie up with some of my past school mates from Hatfield House Lane Infant/Junior school in 63/64 .
  49. 1 point
    Next stop was Darnall following a ride on a 52 (successor to the Crookes to Handsworth tram route) Again, a bit of guesswork here and the usual problem of angles being wrong due to changed road layouts. Two views of the bottom of Prince of Wales Road looking north. First up is a view of the 1950s road layout at the junction of Prince of Wales Road, Main Road and Greenland Road and a modern approximation of the same view. Date of the then shot unknown, now was 27/12/16. And a view of the Darnall Cinema behind car 273 on 05/07/57: now was 27/12/16
  50. 1 point
    Does it mention the special Adolf Hitler Toilet Paper?:)
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