Jump to content

Leaderboard

  1. Sheffield History

    Sheffield History

    Sheffield History Team


    • Points

      16

    • Content Count

      6,950


  2. Edmund

    Edmund

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      10

    • Content Count

      1,823


  3. paulhib48

    paulhib48

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      10

    • Content Count

      48


  4. DaveJC

    DaveJC

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      9

    • Content Count

      40


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 27/12/20 in all areas

  1. The time captured in one small paragraph, my Dad took me into the fish market on Saturday Afternoon for a plate of cockles or mussels, the place was heaving so I had to hold his hand all the time we were in there otherwise I could be swept along with the crowd, it was the only place I’ve ever seen a deer hung up ready to be butchered. All gone, Sheffield is a shadow of what it use to be, the Market is a poor substitute for what we lost. I hate the supermarkets, I would much rather see the small independent shops, grocers, butchers, green grocers, clothes shops, shoe shops, toy shops but their
    2 points
  2. I started work in 1955 at the Wicker Goods Station, Saville Street and can confirm that wagons such as these were still in very common use in the 50's. I also recall Bogies amongst them too - some I think were used by National Benzole petrol & oil company who were based at Lumley Street.
    2 points
  3. Well DaveJC , unfortunately the 48 is the giveaway and I’m 73 this year. Ive also looked at some of the pictures on the 50s thread and can well remember the bombed out buildings in the process of being rebuilt. C&A Modes always sticks in my mind as the tram stop to Firth Park was outside and is a reminder of trips from Totley to visit my grandparents. There were temporary buildings at the bottom of the Moor where it had been flattened. I watched it all being rebuilt but didn’t warm to a single redevelopment, Those blackened substantial buildings that remained and were th
    2 points
  4. This must be after the war, the film Two Men and a Girl in the last photo wasn't released until 1947. Nigel L
    2 points
  5. The answer can be found on this link: https://twitter.com/NancyFielder/status/1350788532835667972
    2 points
  6. Too many really Just part of the journey in the decline of the Sheffield we’d all known and loved
    2 points
  7. The adjacent block was Dyson House, which was owned by the Poly.
    2 points
  8. Wow! That's got to be a now missing section of Bard Street, looking down over the top of High Street Lane. They'd be stood on a path in a bit of parkland today (or perhaps have long since slid down into the road depending on recent weather).
    2 points
  9. Seen them at work today bringing it down. Another one bites the dust.
    2 points
  10. The church with the question mark is St. Andrew's, on St. Andrew's Road, now demolished, used to go to Cubs there in the '60's. Nigel L
    2 points
  11. The European cup, once lost, wss subsequently handed in at West Bar Police Station http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/8709846.stm It was the most prized piece of silverware in European club football - but one night in a pub in the West Midlands, it went missing. Twenty-eight years later the story of how two teams of police officers played to win the European Cup can finally be told. Very few people knew about the disappearance and subsequent recovery of this famous piece of football silverware in Sheffield. A secret kept for the last 28 years. In May, 1982, Aston Vi
    2 points
  12. I know this is from a few months ago but I've only just come across it. I worked at Ralstons for a couple of years in the early 70s. Hard, mucky work but have some good memories
    1 point
  13. There has been an Assay Office in Sheffield since 1773, when local silversmiths, who resented the inconvenience of having to send their wares to London for hallmarking, joined with Birmingham petitioners to ask Parliament for their own Offices. Despite fierce opposition from the London Goldsmiths' Company, an Act of Parliament was passed, granting Sheffield the right to assay silver. Because the Select Committee which considered the petition had uncovered so many abuses by the existing Assay Offices, Parliament made sure that the new ones were more strictly controlled. The Act appointed t
    1 point
  14. Travel back in time to happier times, for a happy sunny walk from Park Square roundabout to Pond Street bus station!
    1 point
  15. It was a beerhouse (on licensed) at the time of the auction referenced and until it's demise. I can't say definitively what happened to the licence at present (it falls within ongoing research), but can suggest a probable chain of events. The long term licensee left in 1880 and is known to have run other premises after that date. It is likely that he transfered out close to the time the property came up for let in the middle of the year, however, by September, when fixtures and fittings were advertised for sale, he was named as seller. The sale in itself doesn't necesarily indicate closure (i
    1 point
  16. This set is around the end of Sheffield Road and Shepcote Lane, with some photos taken from top deck of Tinsley viaduct. 3rd one down is the transport cafe, next door to the Plumpers, now American Golf. If you look on Google maps aerial view, you can still see the ‘CAFE’ letters painted on the roof.
    1 point
  17. FBT was based on Carlisle St. East AND Saville Street (Jncs Windsor St to Princess St) I don't recognise the building, but there WAS a similar building just on Harleston St, (?) where shear bl**es were made (Can't say that can we Neal?) Also look for bessemer house just townside of Harleston St, I'm sure that was FBTs too. I left in 1981.
    1 point
  18. Yes it’s a real shame. The number of pubs alone that have gone is so sad - Even relatively recently there was still half a dozen or more open - but now (pandemic aside) there’s next to nothing. Would love to have gone there when everything was open but before my time really. It’s still a really interesting place to walk round though.
    1 point
  19. The downstairs part of Sheaf House accessed by the yard round the back was occupied by WH Smith Wholesale. They supplied most of the newsagents in Sheffield with newspapers and mags from there in the 60s/70s and maybe later. They also had a showroom where you could buy toys and stationery etc The postal address was : Sheaf House , Sheaf Street
    1 point
  20. Did part of my YTS 'training' in Sheaf House in 1987 at the Area Civil Engineers payroll office. Sorting huge A3 timesheets of the track maintenance workers into piles. Highlight of the week was going to Woodburn Road to pay out with cash in little envelopes...
    1 point
  21. Hi guys, I wondered if anyone on here might be able to help with something (or know someone who can). I’m producing a documentary about John Burkhill aka the green pram man. In his interview he mentions that his wife had being diagnosed with cancer in 1992 and her final wish was to do the marathon and win a finishers medal, as she had never won anything before. John contacted the race organisers and got permission. He said that when they walked into the stadium, it was almost as though they’d won it. Everyone was cheering them on and he said his wife was the happiest he’d ever seen h
    1 point
  22. The result of the above in comparison to: Obviously Google Earth as a few limitations with angles and clarity —plus differences from things like focal-length of cameras, etc, but I think it ends up pretty close so Hallam Tower is definitely a viable candidate and I'm pretty convinced the photo was taken from there.
    1 point
  23. Direct line from the old Hallam Tower to the photo position...
    1 point
  24. Can confirm. Below, from a photo of 2019 of the area where they were, shows some of those yellow & black brick structures as seen in the last screenshot (with metalwork removed).
    1 point
  25. Yes, It is the same street but The door to Donna Hartley's fitness club was Just round the corner (opposite Dixons shop) between the top view and The Moor. It had no back door other than a fire escape because it wasn't at ground level. Donna Hartley took over the Gym which was previously known as The Gateway to Health and I used to train there in the 60's
    1 point
  26. In case anyone is wondering on the position of these 1980's pictures. I can take you through them. The first picture is platform 3 the top end with the lines in the foreground leading over the Wicker Arches. Between the column of stone and the red light signal is the fuzzy image of the signal box, which I mentioned that I had to avoid the signalman in my last post. Picture two and three is platform two looking down the other way to the above picture. You can see the remains of the bay platform or platform one which would not need to be accessed by the subway system or bridges. The ba
    1 point
  27. Incidentally I think the good folks of Woodseats and thereabouts owe a MASSIVE debt to Ray ? Brightman who must have been constantly out with his camera capturing what would have been mundane street scenes but have captured the changes over a significant period and comprise the bulk of Picture Sheffield’s catalogue
    1 point
  28. Birch Road traced a straight route northwesterly from Stevenson Road to Faraday Road and the original Crown sat at the eastern junction (of Birch & Faraday). Though the north-western end was enclosed by the works expansion noted above, and subsequent. Birch Road's earlier, full course remains evident in later maps. Bessemer Road coexisted with Birch Road whilst the latter was at its full extent (as the article you quote from suggests). As an educated guess I'd say the bulk of both roads sprang up through the early to mid 1870s. The death of Hopkinson at the premises would rather indic
    1 point
  29. No, that building is Sheaf House at the railway station. The picture is definitely Olive Grove sports ground. The clubhouse was demolished some years ago and replaced with a more modern building. Used to go there for meetings when I worked for the council.
    1 point
  30. There’s a bit of information on the history here: https://www.sheffieldguide.blog/2020/05/24/sheffield-ski-village-an-olympic-dreams-wasteland/ Also details plans to resurrect the site post-COVID.
    1 point
  31. I understand that this scene was filmed in the early hours of the morning using some impressive lighting set up to simulate daylight which explains why there are no other people about and it's so quiet.
    1 point
  32. ROLL OF HONOUR CIVILIAN WAR DEAD SHEFFIELD 1939-1945 The list below details the Surname-First Name- Age - Date of Death or Injury -Place of Death or Injury Abbey Ada 77 yrs 12 Dec 1940 422 Springvale Road Abbott Thomas 40 yrs 12 Dec 1940 103 Bloar Street Addy Gertrude 56 yrs 13 Dec 1940 9 Windsor Road Addy Joseph 57 yrs 13 Dec 1940 9 Windsor Road Alcock Frederick 50 yrs 13 Dec 1940 34 St Marys Road Allen Mary 32 yrs 12 Dec 1940 High Street Antcliffe Arthur 10 yrs 15 Dec 1940 96 B
    1 point
  33. 1 point
  34. Loved the film and was impressed by Robert Carlyle's Sheffield accent. But in the canal scene he used an expression I have never heard here; - "he's got a benny on" Anyone else use this?
    1 point
  35. Glossop Road Baths-spent many happy hours there in the late 1950s.
    1 point
  36. I recall Manor Lodge, when there was far more of it standing, the council have a curious habit of deciding to preserve something when there’s little left of it. I further recall it having a resident couple who charged folk to show them around the remains, whilst telling fanciful tales of Mary, Queen of Scots.
    1 point
  37. I stand corrected, my spelling skills are nothing compared to those of my dancing. 😜
    1 point
  38. I remember West Bar Cop Shop. A few of us from the Helen Wilson Settlement Youth Club, at the bottom-end of Rutland Road, went for a look round the place. One of the officers brought in a police-dog called Caesar, and when I reached out to stroke it the officer pulled on it's lead to stop it getting any closer, and advised me an everybody else never to get your hand that close to a police dog's teeth. A couple of years later in 1969, me and a mate of mine went to a Judo class in an area somewhere close to the top floor. Our idea was to learn how to handle ourselves properly in the
    1 point
  39. I have just walked away from the bus shelter, could not stand it for a minute longer. Women moaning about the bloody awful weather and leaking bus shelters, then there is a bloke in a Lavender coloured Triumph Herald sticking his head out of his car window complaining about some stuck up "toff" parking his jag on the wrong side of the road. Then I spotted Two more women heading for the bus shelter having just dodged a couple of low flying reindeer. I just thought "sod this" I am off, I have only got to walk to Wincobank, a brisk 10 minutes will do it..At least it will be quiet.
    1 point
  40. According to the technical info released with the movie the locations given are:- Burbage Rocks, Derbyshire, England. Gleadless Valley, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. Heavygate Road, Crookes, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. Millstone Edge, Derbyshire, England. The Vine Pub, Cemetary Road, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. Thorpe Marsh Power Station, Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England. Plus a couple more I noticed Tinsley cooling towers(RIP) Fox & Duck, Sheffield Road Tinsley The Country and Western nigh
    1 point
  41. The more I look at it the more I think there's something else "underneath" the more obvious writing. This is what I'm sure is there so far. But what's behind I'm still trying to work out.
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...