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  1. 5 points
    Hi all, so glad I found this site, so much history in one place. I was born at walkley in 65, moved to Bubwith rd Brightside where my mum was born and grandparents lived. From there we lived in a cottage in Roe Woods, my dad became one of the first 6 park patrollers, on motorbikes, in Sheffield while at Roe Wood. From there we moved to Shiregreen where mum still lives. Dad was born at the bottom end of Bellhouse rd. Have lived in a few places in Sheffield and now 20 years in Chesterfield. Looking forward to reading lots more and to dig up some of my own memories and photos to share with everyone. :-))
  2. 4 points
    Here is one of my Grandfather's glass slides of High Street that looks to be taken from about the same place
  3. 4 points
    Last year's thread and I rediscovered this 35mm slide which seems to fit appropriately into this one.Taken in June 1963 when rear loaders were favourite and steam locos much in evidence at Midland Station.
  4. 3 points
    I've got several locations with pictures, but never seen an exposure as big as this one. 4 lines into 2? Any other geeks might want to keep an eye out down there, as they are redeveloping it, so more might be uncovered. Exchange Place into Blonk Street
  5. 3 points
    Many thanks for the comments on the maps we have been uploading to Picture Sheffield recently. The City Archives and Local Studies Library has a wonderful collection comprising thousands of maps dating from the 16th century onwards. We are trying to give the collection a higher profile and make it available to as many people as possible. The maps are scanned at exactly the same resolution as the photographs. The difference however comes from the need to compress very large maps down to a size where they fit on a computer screen. In the light of recent comments however we have reviewed how we process the map images. The zoomed image is now larger and presented in a higher quality format. Hopefully this allows you to see more detail without slowing down the performance of Picture Sheffield. We are currently working our way through all of the map images on Picture Sheffield to improve them. The series prefixed ‘arc’ is complete. The other main set of maps (prefixed ‘y’) should be complete within a few weeks. As well as viewing the maps on Picture Sheffield the originals remain available at the City Archives and at the Local Studies Library in the Central Library should you wish to consult them. We welcome everyone who wishes to use the service in person or online. If you have any further comments or suggestions feel free to contact me via archives@sheffield.gov.uk Peter Evans, Archives and Heritage Manager
  6. 3 points
    We believe we have the only pre-war Guy Vixen still in existence, please tell me if you know of another, this is a 1938 and will be seen at all the local rally's
  7. 3 points
    My grandfather was a keen amateur photographer who died before I was born. My father had a box of his 3" glass slides that I inherited and have now digitised. Unfortunately only 2 are of Sheffield street scenes. Many of them are in the Yorkshire dales. There is even one that he took in Bruges and took one from the same bridge in Bruges to prove it. I have uploaded Fitzalan square previously. "Blade forging" was written on the other picture and may be my Grandmother's family.
  8. 3 points
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  9. 3 points
    Hello , I`m Kate , thanks for letting me join . Although I have lived in Cornwall for many years , I was born in Sheffield ( Derbyshire Lane ) and spent my youth in and around the city . I have particularly fond memories of the area around Meersbrook and Albert Road where my beloved grandparents lived , I spent a lot of time with them at number 178 , long demolished for some flats . I have old photos of their garden overlooking the Meersbrook and on up to the park , but sadly no one in the family has any photos of the front of the terrace on Albert Road . I would dearly love to visit Sheffield again but my husbands health is not good so I content myself with memories !
  10. 3 points
    From various Church magazines. St Cuthberts mid 1940s, St Hildas late 1960s, early 70s.
  11. 3 points
    Here is an extract from the 1950 OS survey Meersbrook Park in June 1963.
  12. 3 points
    Finally! I found an image showing the building that was shown on the far left of the original photograph. The white gable end with the double chimney appears to be connected with the Abbeydale Mill. At least I think that’s what the signage above the door reads? So, I believe this is the building that was shown with the purple circle in my earlier photo. http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;u03677&action=zoom&pos=6&id=38830&continueUrl= Some more images of the area, in both directions, in different decades.... http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12848&action=zoom&pos=41&id=15752&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12951&action=zoom&pos=43&id=15850&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s16449&action=zoom&pos=48&id=19166&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s12850&action=zoom&pos=57&id=15754&continueUrl= http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;w00051&pos=7&action=zoom&id=45420
  13. 3 points
    Made in Great Britain, BBC2, Series exploring how the craft and manufacturing skills have shaped Great Britain Friday 26th October, 2100 hrs. run time, 59 minutes . Episode 1 https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bpz4ks The makers experience Sheffield's transformation into an industrial powerhouse known as 'Steel City', famous throughout the world for making high quality steel and cutlery. In this episode, four craft-makers experience Sheffield's rapid transformation from a rural market town to an industrial powerhouse that built modern Britain known as 'Steel City'. Sheffield became famous throughout the world for making high quality steel blades and cutlery. Steph McGovern takes them through the ages and they are guided by local Sheffield cutler Corin Mellor. Starting in the 18th century, they are tasked with hand forging a scythe at Abbeydale Works. This farming tool found recent fame when used by a shirtless Poldark, but the makers discover it was one of Sheffield's biggest exports that launched Britain's steel industry. The process proves to be a hugely physical challenge. Next, they step into the heart of a Victorian production line to make cutlery stamped with the fashionable King's Pattern. Steph learns that the extravagant Victorian middle class had a different piece of cutlery for every type of food. They prepare the knives, forks and spoons ready for electroplating - 'blinging' up the cutlery by covering it in silver. The biggest innovations are yet to come. Travelling forward to the start of the 20th century, the makers learn that stainless steel was discovered in Sheffield, bringing affordable cutlery to the masses. They experience Sheffield's transformation into a war machine to defend Britain - making WWII Commando Knives using a heavy duty drop stamp. Now in the 21st century, Corin Mellor takes the makers to his state-of-the-art factory, David Mellor Design. Here, they make high-end stainless steel forks from one of factory's bestselling ranges. With the city's focus on quality rather than quantity, the craft-makers discover that Sheffield's historic cutlery industry is still thriving.
  14. 3 points
    I think this answers the question - Woodbourn Hotel FC - lots of press cuttings to piece the story together.
  15. 3 points
    I may be my age but to me "then" usually looks better than "now".
  16. 3 points
    Sheffield Council Planning Department want shooting for what they've done to The Moorfoot. I grew up in a little house just across the road from The S & E Co-op or The Arcade as it was known as. The 50s and the 60s it was a vibrant and bustling area from the town hall all the way down. It's an absolute crime and I could weep when I see what it's like today.
  17. 2 points
    Hi Everyone, The first 4 episodes of my new My Life In The Mosh Of Ghosts podcast have just gone live. Featuring The Runaways, Be Bop Deluxe, After The Fire and Rokka, all live in Sheffield in 1977-78. You can listen on Apple/Spotify/Stitcher here - http://smarturl.it/MyLifeInTheMosh Or on TuneIn - https://tunein.com/podcasts/Music-Podcasts/My-Life-In-The-Mosh-Of-Ghosts-p1224570/ Or on Blubrry - https://www.blubrry.com/mylifeinthemoshofghosts/ Or on Buzzsprout - http://mylifeinthemoshofghosts.buzzsprout.com/ Hope you like it! Thanks Dodger
  18. 2 points
    Hello The other day I was cycling round Brightside and went up Colliery Road and wondered why it was there, its too narrow for two way traffic and the bridges are too low. After some time researching I have written this short essay, I think I have gleaned as much as I can for this without having to make a visit to Sheffield Archives. https://www.g7smy.co.uk/2019/04/history-colliery-road/ Karl
  19. 2 points
    Many, many thanks to both Edmund and dunsbyowl1867 for their very quick replies. And the wealth of information they have given me - far more than I ever expected and I am extremely grateful. Has helped me with a much more rounded picture of the recipient of the silver vesta than I could have hoped for. Thanks again Chris
  20. 2 points
    I grew up on Ridgehill Ave leaving in 1966 when I was 14. Hollinsend Rec was our local park, an all year round venue. I remember the Whit Sunday parade and also have a vague memory of a fun day, with a clown and other entertainment. The park keeper (parky) in those days was Jack Metcalfe, a pleasent chap who knew most of our names. Every evening at dusk the parky would blow his whistle, clearing the park before locking the gates to the main park and play ground. The park buildings were all painted Sheffield green, a paint source which found it's way to various houses around the city! The large wooden hut in the play ground was open at the front, so once we knew the parky had gone home we would climb over the fence and use it as our den. I have a broken front tooth which is a result of an accident in the play ground. I was climbing on the front of the cast iron rocking horse when my pal Timmy Brammer jumped on at the back causing the head to fly up and clout me in the mouth! I attended Gleadless County School and the headteacher at that time was Mr Jack Spur. Our teacher in the top juniors was Mr Dyson and I also remember Barbara Metcalfe who was the other top junior teacher. She used to take us swimming to Park Baths on City Road. I remember Mr Spur passing away when we were in the early years at Hurlfield but I can't remeber the circumstances of his death. In those days the school was only on one side of Hollisend Road, the new buildings on the other side of the road were added later. My brother John passed away in 2004 and so we scattered his ashes in the long grass by the little stream. I was surprised to see that the stream had almost dried up, when we were kids it was quite fast flowing and was full of frogs and tiny fresh water shrimps. Wonderful childhood memories of a much loved park! Wazzie Worrall
  21. 2 points
    Sorry I misunderstood. What I do is use the "unread content button" which should appear as on one of the pictures below , and when on the "unread content" page there should be a link top left or on the left of the same line to "activity". The activity page appears in order of date with latest activity first. You can also "mark the site read" so that old content that doesn't interest you will not appear in the unread content. "Mark the site read" in the top instance is in the menu extreme top right or in the second just to the right of unread content.
  22. 2 points
    modern 'journalism' at its finest. Hide behind youtube and stir some s***. It brought the city together, made us very proud to be sheffielders and remembered the lads who paid the ultimate sacrifice. who plants the bedding plants and sweeps up from time to time is of little or no consequence. I dont see what youre trying to achieve by posting it to be honest.
  23. 2 points
    Update to the landlords of the Bird in Hand (originally next door to the Cutlers Hall, demolished in 1832 for the west end of the new hall) from R E Leader's History of the Cutlers Company: 1736 - 1738 Matthias Hobson 1741 - 1755 William Dixon 1757-1759 John Thompson after 1761 Richard Brittlebank, then John Colquhoun 1772 - 1808 John Rose to 1817 Thomas Rose 1809 John Richards
  24. 2 points
    Hi, I have recently moved to Sheffield, and come from Sussex originally however my maternal grandfather came from here, born in 1884. I'm interested in finding out more about his years here. He emigrated to Australia after the 2nd World War and died there in 1981. His name was George Huntley and grew up in Ecclesall. His father Kossuth Huntley worked on the railways. He married a Sheffielder named Mary Jane Padley in 1872. George Huntley rose to rank of Sergeant in WW1 and worked with a motorised ambulance convoy and was in the Somme in 1916/17. They are supposed to have been a well known family in their day but that was a long time ago. I have very few photos of the family but attach some here. George is in uniform pictured around 1915. His brother Louis here appeared in a 1928 article about the Charfield train accident in Gloucestershire in which their sister was killed. The sister who died, Clara Johnson, is also pictured as are their parents Kossuth Huntley and Mary Jane Padley George was a mechanical engineer and worked out of Norfolk Row between the wars where he was an agent for popular makes of cars and lorries of the day. Cheers, Alan Evans
  25. 2 points
    This is my class at Crookesmore School,1960. I'm second from the left at the top (with the lapel badges). The teacher was Miss Sant, who afterwards became Mrs Copley. It's a funny thing, but I don't remember ever being in a 'boys only' class. However, pictures don't lie, so I must have been. The other thing to notice is the huge stone columns which held the school up above the playground and made it quite dark in places.
  26. 2 points
    make every day an adventure you don't know when its your last one
  27. 2 points
    Here's a great video by a real train driver filmed by him, with explanations of the route taken this year. With unedited passage through tunnels and yes Totley Tunnel. The only time he stops the video is waiting time at stations. Things to watch for include the speed signs, especially into Sheffield. Plus how quickly the train accelerators. When he stops the train in a station, the driver has to know when to apply the brakes. There's nothing telling him now stop for the next station.
  28. 2 points
    Welcome KateR , I think you will find that you have come to the best place for Sheffield history and memories. I have fond memories of the Heeley and Meersbrook area having lived and worked round that area in a few locations from the late 40's to the late 70's . I have not got a picture of the front of that house but if I am right in saying that it was just past Brooklyn Road I think you will be able to pick it out on this 1935 aerial shot.
  29. 2 points
  30. 2 points
    Having taken a long hard look again my opinion is that we are being somewhat confused by the strength of the camera's ability to foreshorten the distances we are seeing. The first road junction nearest to the camera is Charles Street (on both sides of the road) and the new looking boarding on the left surrounded the site shown in the PS s24079 image (Cambridge Arcade etc.). The concrete street lighting columns would have been erected at approximately 100 foot intervals,subject to practical considerations,and if you look at their number on the original picture and how close they appear to be,that demolition site is the whole of that block of shops. That illuminated circular sign and solid white line would be a 'STOP' whilst there are double yellow lines just visible,on both photos,on the opposite side of the road corner. Between us , we seem to be getting more of the pieces of this one sorted out and just to prove that older threads can be very useful the camera location on this one would have been near to the old Barrel Inn!
  31. 2 points
    I have added some notes and finding aids to the first post in this thread, including a complete list of the insurance maps.
  32. 2 points
    I can add a little about the shops at the top of Ridgehill Avenue as I lived on that road from the age of 4 in the 50s. Baumgart’s had a clean and bright feeling to the grocery shop, complete with the glass lidded tins of biscuits at the front of the counter. I always found it somewhat exotic as Mr Baumgart spoke English with his German accent. Next door was a hardware shop where I was once sent to buy extra squash glasses, decorated with coloured frosting, for one of my birthday parties. The wool shop also sold socks and stockings, even a few clothes. Priestly’s newsagaent also sold a few groceries. The parade across the road had the hairdresser, next a fruit and veg shop where you had your own shopping bag filled with your purchases, the muddy potatoes always going in first. The butchers was next and Billingham’s grocers at the end, complete with bacon slicer and I think the butter and sugar were loosely packed too. You could order your groceries before the weekend and he would deliver them to you.
  33. 2 points
    Having not so far been reprimanded for straying over the boundary into Rotherham I will tempt fate by adding an updated list of all known survivors of Rotherham Corporation Transport (RCT) motorbuses, trolleybuses and support vehicles in Great Britain, three in each category. Actually a very small number when compared with other municipal operations of a similar size. Of particular note is FET 218 the Austin K8 Welders Truck dating back to 1949. Although sold into preservation by SYPTE in 1977 it had been presumed the lack of any reports in recent years were an indication that it no longer survived. That however was not the case and in the last couple of months ownership has changed and it has returned to South Yorkshire. Despite being stored in the open for over twenty years it is in reasonable condition with a full restoration expected to get underway shortly No photographs of FET 218 in service have yet emerged so if anyone has any please make contact. It now has a pick-up style of back which during its later days had a frame with canvas cover. Whether this was how it was originally configured is not known for sure as a previous owner recalls that it may have originally had a conventional van body that was cut down by RCT at some point. Thus the appeal for photographs. Although a number of Austin K8's have been restored, pictures of which can be found on the net, none have a similar pick up style back which does suggest that the one on FET 218 may be a product of the Rawmarsh Road body shop.
  34. 2 points
  35. 2 points
    Thought this would be quite easy to answer until I spotted a glaring omission in the published Rotherham Corporation Transport Fleet Histories I consulted. All these omitted the 1952 batch of Crossley Double Deckers! Perhaps the reason for the question? Anyhow, further delving reveals these to be 209 - 214 HET 209-214. However, the chassis numbers are not in numerical sequence when it comes to road registrations and quoted delivery months. 95903 HET 509 209 5/52 95904 HET 510 210 6/52 95905 HET 511 211 6/52 95906 HET 512 212 7/52 95907 HET 514 214 9/52 95908 HET 513 213 8/52 Thus, although 213 was the last Crossley built for Rotherham it was not the last delivered. . As far as I am aware 213 is still tucked away in a bomb proof hanger at the Science Museum store at Wroughton Airfield near Swindon. Public Access is now very restricted if permitted at all. Can't say too much on a public forum other than to say an approach was made about displaying 213 at the Midland Road Open Day in 2014. Unfortunately the hoops were set too high for it to have been practical. The hope had been to display all two and a half surviving RCT Motor buses together but in the event only 135 made it, With so few RCT motor buses surviving it is to be hoped that 213 can return home at some point in the future. The South Yorkshire Transport Museum being an ideal home especially since 220 has departed for Beamish. Hope this digression into Rotherham is within the permitted boundaries of this forum.
  36. 2 points
    The new series of Doctor Who is to be filmed in Sheffield.
  37. 2 points
    Some photos of The Grand Hotel and surrounding area, the first two from 1926, the next five from 1951/2 and the last a modern aerial view, from approximately the same angle and height of the one before. You can see the site where ‘The Grand’ stood, but nothing visible remains of it, yet buildings immediately adjacent (and the garden on Barker’s Pool) still survive.
  38. 2 points
    According to the above article the original building was largely pulled down in 1868. However a building on the site was still called Attercliffe Hall. In 1878 "Attercliffe Hall" was a club for working men - with a bar - the steward was Mr Milner, presumably of the Milners who had previously resided there. In February 1879 part of the hall was advertised for rent: four low rooms, four bedrooms, W.C., stable and coach-house. Gamalial Milner occuped Attercliffe House or Hall - on Attercliffe Green Road, changed to Lord Street, now Leeds Road
  39. 2 points
    Probably of no interest to anyone else, but one of the photos here shows the location of my Dad’s bench, sited and dedicated to his memory for almost twenty years now...
  40. 2 points
    If the date on this Picture Sheffield Photograph is correct boginspro, the track extension to Abbey Lane would be a year or two after 1912 Question for Voldy! did trolley buses ever run in Sheffield?
  41. 2 points
    No part of the council has any respect for anything to do with history or heritage. Anyone can do anything provided they provide a big brown envelope with enough £50 notes in it! That's the impression I get anyway.
  42. 2 points
    Film about Derwent Valley Reservoirs and Dams
  43. 2 points
    I think you have the right angle there @boginspro and here’s a few photos from the same era, to help put the Cross Daggers in perspective..... The last photo is one in almost the exact reverse angle; The photographer is probably taking the shot from the corner of the square bay of The Royal Hotel. You can see the building on the left reversed and Coo Hill descending behind.... Sadly, my formative years were at the point where all this was being demolished and the ‘precinct’ replaced it. Although I lived a fair walk from ‘the village’, the precinct never really seemed to take off and only the Co-op kept it alive. When that moved to the top of Chapel Street, it was curtains for the precinct and maybe that time was the death knell for the village centre? As a ‘wudhus’ lad, it’s sad to see what’s left there today, but maybe that’s the way of all villages, having the life blood sucked out of them by shopping centres and online grocery deliveries???....
  44. 2 points
  45. 2 points
    In direct answer to the question, NO THEY ARE NOT. The planning panel are mostly unqualified to make an individual true assesment of the plan put forward in a sensitive conservation area. They read the paperwork proposals, but unless they have actually been to the area, and investigated how a planned building will affect the 'neighbouring properties', and talked to 'local people', directly taking on board the issues they have, they truly are NOT respectful of the reason WHY it is a CONSERVATION AREA. It was made a CONSERVATION AREA for a REASON. We all know of heritage buildings and areas lost to this WONDERFUL CITY, by past planning panels shocking decisions.
  46. 2 points
    A quick update from Wessex Archaeology - https://www.wessexarch.co.uk/news/sheffield-castle-what-week
  47. 2 points
    If I remember right the ceiling was painted matt black with stars painted on to make it look as though you were outside..
  48. 2 points
    Have a look at this photo this is one of a huge collection from Eddy Saxby and shows a typical Sheffield scene, cobbled streets, terraced houses, a small handful of cars on the street etc This to me is Sheffield and I love this photo so much. In everyone's drawers and cupboards there has to be hundreds and thousands of these. Do you have any lying around that you could/would share
  49. 2 points
    I bought this postcard today and was so thrilled with it I thought I would share it. I would broadly guess it was taken in the 1930s, would anyone like to narrow it down a little? I like the long gone buildings and factories, for instance Walker and Hall's premises at the top of Howard Street. Feel free to comment! I've scanned at a hi res so you can look further and download. Thank you.
  50. 2 points
    Bus stop out side Northern General Hospital...Herries Road End
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