Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 17/10/20 in Posts

  1. I don't know whether it's to do with the lockdown & Covid precautions and we are mainly staying at home but much of the site recently, has been taken up with photo's, videos etc of what's happening in the city centre now. Others may feel differently but I personally am not the slightest bit interested in today's modern Sheffield because I feel that the council and planners have ripped the heart out of everything this city meant to me. There was a bit of chat about the old Coles Bros etc but many seem not to care too much about the resulting demise of John Lewis and think it was too expensive anyway. As Debenhams has suffered the same fate, the result is that If you like wandering around department stores, then apart from Atkinson's (long may they survive), there is no point in going to town at all. In my early days of marriage, I was lucky enough to get the tenancy of the house next door to where I was born. It was left full of very good quality but quite old furniture. The first thing I did was chop it all up and buy modern, early 60's furniture throughout (the thought makes me shudder now) and only in later years did I realise my stupid mistake. I don't think Sheffield Council have had that realisation yet but, as in my case, it's now too late to rectify it. I view lots of old videos and photos of old Sheffield and it brings one close to tears when you see all those MASSIVE crowds of people scurrying about like ants in the old city centre, and compare that with the lifeless and soulless scenes of today. You would think we had endured a nuclear holocaust and the end of the world was nigh. I remember crossing the footbridge, (never seen any photos of this) to the old Castle Fish market with my Grandma in the early 40's and enjoying cockles or mussels or, better still, chips, pie & peas from a stall which I still took my family to more than half a century later and basked in the nostalgia of those poor but happy days. The old Rag & tag market was equally as much loved. What will younger generations get nostalgic about in years to come but a dead city centre which will look nice although soulless until it's covered in graphiti, beer cans and litter.
    6 points
  2. Here are a selection of paintings by a Sheffield artist who was active in the very early 1800's, W Botham. There's not much information available but apart from the late birth date I'd say he was William Hallam Botham, born 23rd April 1790 to Eleanor and George Botham. George Botham was a Confectioner and Glass and China merchant in 1792, based at Irish Cross, selling raisins, nuts, lemons, prunes etc. In August 1797 the business was at 14 Market Place. William Botham was a fellow apprentice of Francis Chantrey when they were both at Ramsey's carver and gilder, High Street. Later, Chantrey worked in a room above a confectionery shop in the High Street kept by a man named Botham - possibly George?
    6 points
  3. Hello I just finished writing the code for this Watermills of Sheffield page, it's an interactive map showing all the locations of the watermills listed in the book 'The Water-Mills of Sheffield' by W.T. Miller published in 1947. Tap on a mill for its name, and tap on the name for the description from the book. https://www.g7smy.co.uk/history/watermills/ I've written it for use on a mobile phone, for when you are out and about, and on this the GPS can be used to show your location. It will also work with a desktop PC. Thanks Karl.
    6 points
  4. Just found this picture of the Albert Hall amongst my mother-in-laws old photos - it says it was taken just after the fire
    4 points
  5. I recall having just passed the dreaded 11 plus back in 54 and was destined for the "Redcaps". That summer, a group of us...all off to different schools in September.. decided that this would doubtless be our last summer of "playing around". ( how wrong we were) We constructed a trench system, of sorts, on Hartley Brook and spent ,what seemed like weeks, firing off masses of caps at one another. We then in a moment of inspiration diverted the meandering "Brook" and gave the old Wortley Rural District a few square yards of extra land. The semi drained WW2 static water tank was reflooded , by diverting the Brook, and this became the place where we "punted" on an old Fletchers bread van roof panel. All innocent stuff.( I think).no drugs...no drink and no electronics and how we enjoyed ourselves!☺️
    3 points
  6. Once again, I found your video of Killamarsh Station to be fascinating, although I did find my eyes watering just a little, when I realised as to how much this scene has changed since my youth. So, I have again taken the opportunity of sharing with you, some images taken by myself in “happier times”, i.e. 1977, when this section of the line remained open, as a freight only route in order to serve collieries at Staveley. For a potted, though relatively detailed description and history of both, the station and the railway, I recommend the Disused Station Website, link below: http://disused-stations.org.uk/k/killamarsh/index.shtml I hope that you can relate them back to the remains and locations shown in your video. GCR001-Killamarsh Central Station-Down Platform, 16/06/1977 GCR002-Killamarsh Central Station-Looking North, 16/06/1977 GCR003-Killamarsh Central Station-Looking North, 16/06/1977 GCR004-Killamarsh Central Station, EEVF.E3615-D1014/1966, Class 20, No.20144 & EEVF.E3616-D1015/1966, Class 20, No.20145, 16/06/1977 GCR005-Killamarsh Central Station-Up Platform, 16/06/1977 GCR006-Killamarsh Central Station-Looking North, 16/06/1977 GCR007-Killamarsh Central Station-Looking North, 16/06/1977
    3 points
  7. Thank you very much for posting your video. I really enjoyed watching the same. It’s a very long time indeed since I last visited the L. D &. E. C. R., and I am both, amazed and saddened by how much this long defunct line has changed so much in the past 40+ years. I have taken the opportunity of sharing with you, some images taken by myself in “happier times”. I hope that you can relate them back to the remains and locations shown in your video. LDE001-Upperthorpe and Killamarsh Station Site, Looking North Towards Beighton-16/06/1977 LDE003-Upperthorpe and Killamarsh Station Site, Looking North Towards Beighton-16/06/1977 LDE007-BTL.537/1964, Class 47, No.47180 at Upperthorpe and Killamarsh Station Site, Looking South Towards Spinkhill-16/06/1977 LDE008-BTL.537/1964, Class 47, No.47180 at Upperthorpe and Killamarsh Station Site, Looking North Towards Beighton-16/06/1977 LDE011-Killamarsh Junction, LD&ECR bridge over Waleswood Curve, Looking North Towards Beighton-16/06/1977 LDE019-Meadowgate Lane, Beighton-LD&ECR Bridge over Norwood Colliery-Killamarsh (M.R.) Branch, View South towards Killamarsh-09/06/1977 LDE020-BTL.525/1964, Class 47, No.47168 at LD&ECR Bridge over Norwood Colliery-Killamarsh (M.R.) Branch (with GCR Bridge Foreground)-09/06/1977 LDE029-ECR/1977, Class 56, No.56024 at Killamarsh Junction, LD&ECR bridge over Waleswood Curve, on ex-Westhorpe Colliery Mineral Train-14/07/1977
    3 points
  8. I'm afraid that I disagree with that Dave, as my family and fore bears, like all those around us, shopped in the Rag & Tag, Castle Market, and Norfolk Market Hall, all their lives without dying of food poisoning or anything similar. We didn't battle for expensive parking places as we walked from Heeley to town, did our shopping and walked home again. In the old days there were no suburban supermarkets so we did much of our shopping at our local shops but always went to town on Saturdays and at holiday times besides works lunch times. I, personally always enjoyed shopping in town and, for that reason, I also never let my fingers do the walking as this is responsible for the demise of shops and the death of the city centres. The minute we have a power outage, everyone will suddenly find that they can't buy anything which doesn't sound good if we suffer a cyber attack. I prefer to buy things in shops, who pay their taxes and help to pay the cost of keeping everything running. Our present lifestyle is unsustainable and will change whether we like it or not. Yes, we have changed along with the town centres but we are going to have to change back again. It's laughable that we now have wider pavements than we ever had but hardly any pedestrians. Compare that with the throngs of pedestrians we saw in the old days. We are going to finish up with a city centre of fancy paving but no shops except cafes and coffee bars and good luck with the visible police presence. I hope to NOT live long enough to see the finished article
    3 points
  9. You really would have to have been born into a certain class of society and in a certain period to really appreciate the benefits of the rag n tag, Norfolk Market Hall and Dixon Lane. It wasn't about prices (which were as low as they could get), nor was it about quality (which was as varied as you chose), it was about COMMUNITY. A community that travelled together on trams and buses, not cars, that walked long distances without thinking it extraordinary, that faced hardships such as coal rationing, very long snowbound winters and basic foodstuffs and which above all related to one another. This last part applied on the streets, in the pubs, in the churches, and in the mucky, disease provoking workshops of an industrial city which was proud of its name. Those contributors here who denigrate the atmosphere of the Saturday markets can not have had a life rooted in such fertile ambience. You could not go "to town" on a Saturday without meeting several acquaintances or relatives. It was a village atmosphere in a city. Now such puritan architecture experts try to re-create such an ambience with false identities like Poundbury. You can't. Meadowhall will never be like the rag n tag. It was there. We loved it. We missed it and will miss it for all our remaining days along with the colourful characters who you see in the historic black and white photos. Cherish the photos. Regret that you didn't experience it. For it was US....US SHEFFIELDERS...us carrying coal from the canal wharf in a barrow, picking up horsemuck for the tiny rosebed in the backyard, clearing the snow off our front, spreading coke on icebound steep footpaths, and visiting family every Saturday on Sunday, unannounced but always welcomed. This WAS life! A postal order from your grandad at Christmas was like a win on the treble chance. An apple and an orange a fruitful bounty. Everything that came after that was, by comparison, shallow and lifeless. You can have your nightclubs and your cocktail bars. You have NOT lived. The writer's grandmother sold flowers in Dixon Lane from an upturned fruitbox. She was killed by an unlicensed teenage driver as she crossed East Bank Road on her way home . RIP Martha Westnidge. RIP the best days of our life.
    3 points
  10. I can understand that, I once fell from off a thirty foot ladder, luckily I was on the bottom rung.
    3 points
  11. Hi Athy, I've not heard 'Like Knitting Sand' or 'Plaiting Fog...' before. When I worked for Derbyhire CC in the early 90's one of my colleagues used to say 'It's Like Knitting Fog!' She was usually referring to the complete nonsense which senior people came out with in meetings. Another expression which came out of those meetings was 'Purposeful Dithering'. I little later on another 'bright spark' came up with 'Bullshit Bingo'. Everytime somebody came out with a nonsense expression in a meeting he would tick a card and then when he had a straight line shout 'House'. Unfortunately none of this stopped the constant flow of 'hot air'!!! Wazzie Worrall.....
    3 points
  12. I was looking through some photos I had saved, and what a surprise, the London Road shop 🙂
    3 points
  13. Len, the pub you mention (Bagshawe Arms) is still there, and the site is relatively untouched/neglected, but its a great site for wildlife. Although the buildings are gone, you can still make out the original layout of the site today. A small section of the original road is still there, from before they made the dual carriageway, that section survives as a curved lay-by where I've marked the arrow. I believe this is where the original main entrance was?...
    3 points
  14. The answer can be found on this link: https://twitter.com/NancyFielder/status/1350788532835667972
    3 points
  15. Vulcan fly past at RAF Norton airshow, year unknown.
    2 points
  16. I was sent for a trip on the outer circular when I was twelve, a bottle of Jusoda and a packet of crisps, when I arrived back home my family had moved without telling me, if you believe that you will believe anything.
    2 points
  17. I don't really want hints a tips, I was quite happy as it was.
    2 points
  18. Yes I bought my first work suite in 1952 there….
    2 points
  19. The largest congregation of Yellow Bins known. There are six visible in this postcard
    2 points
  20. Remnants of Watery Lane. Inspection chamber covers along the course of Watery Lane on what is now The Ponderosa which survive as markers of where the street was originally laid. I recorded them in the following order walking east to west and estimate them to be situated near the following positions in comparison with the old streets that also existed at the time. 1 = Watery Lane/Adelphi St/Fountain Square 2 = Watery Lane /Adelphi St 3 = Watery Lane 4 = Watery Lane near the junction with Hammond St. Watery Lane originally existed as a track that ran from Port Mahon towards the terraced dams at Crookes on what is now the upper reaches of the Ponderosa towards Crookes Valley Road and was recorded on various maps prior to the extensive development of the area around the 1830’s. I suspect these covers were put in when Watery Lane was developed and the small stream that ran along the course of the lane was culverted. N.B. Photo's taken Feb 2021.
    2 points
  21. As promised here is the video of my recent visit
    2 points
  22. A platform level view of the train shed, taken in 1953 might interest a few folks. Copyright retained. For the record, the locomotives are:- Class 5MT, No.45262, of Shed No.19A, Grimesthorpe, built by Armstrong Whitworth, to Works No.1317, in 1936. Class B1, No.61224, of Shed No.50A, York North, built by North British Locomotive, Glasgow, to Works No. 26125, in 1947.
    2 points
  23. My dad had done his stint in the War and had no problem with it all. Let’s be honest everything in the 50s was talking about it or harking back to it. There were endless war films and boys comics were full of stories about beating the Jerries . Take that Fritz !! So if we weren’t out in the woods beating the Hun we were emulating our cowboy heroes who were also constantly in films or on tv. Everyday for me it was playing army or cowboys. From about 5 upwards . Throw in a kick about in the park and that was my childhood . No car, so no day trips or very few. You just amused yourself and didn’t expect somebody to entertain you like my own kids eventually did and my grandkids constantly do. Give the kids guns and get them off their XBoxes !!
    2 points
  24. I mentioned this topic to a retired Councillor friend and she reminded me that during the MASSIVE slum clearances of the 50/60s ,when whole local communities and their infrastructure were being discarded/destroyed to be rehoused in new Council estates and high rise flats, its affects on mental health was such that Sheffield had one of the highest incidences of suicide in the UK. Sheffield was, indeed, a wealthy City...in parts. It was said that outside of London our Rolls Royce dealer (Hoffman's?) sold more "Rollers" than anywhere else. That said, there was poverty...even post War and with full employment. The lot of a steel works labourer, married, with a couple of children and a wife who didn't work ( as most didn't once they had children) and with little "overtime" was one of belt tightening at all times. Similarly, many widows had a hard time of things especially if they had no close living relatives. All of the above is history as much as dates and battles ( beloved of my old history masters).
    2 points
  25. Electrically powered vehicles? Bottles which are recycled? Gosh, how very old-fashioned.
    2 points
  26. Only odd because we've somewhat lost the original sense. Round about 1200 the phrase "Ȝif þou þis nelt don þou salt don worse" (If thou this not done, thou shalt do worse = If you don't do this, you'll do worse). This is the earliest example in the OED of "to do" being used in the sense of "to fare" or "to get on". A little later there is "‘We sal’, he said, ‘do nu ful wele’" (We shall, he said, do now full well) and later still "Your horsyn do well" (horses). In 1697 the phrase "There, how d'ye do now?" was recorded and by 1738 "How do you do, Tom?". You might be thought a bit odd, but "How do you fare" would be a modern replacement. Anyhow, thanks for triggering off a wander through the OED, always fascinating.
    2 points
  27. They were probably attracted by the roundabout, giving them easy access to the Parkway 😀
    2 points
  28. An enlargement of the platform building as depicted in the above image. Unfortunately, some of the fine details that the photographer captured for posterity have been lost in this compressed download. Copyright to this image is retained. However:- The classic MS&LR, cast-iron, platform signage, above the three visible doorways, from left to right, read GENERAL WAITING ROOM, LADIES WAITING ROOM and GENTLEMEN. Unfortunately, the full details on all of the five exhibited posters cannot be discerned, even at a very high scanning resolution, but the following text can be noted:- “Services to Rotterdam & Antwerp” – second from left “Tourist Tickets to Grimsby & Cleethorpes” – fifth from left Cast Iron Seat Backs display “M S & L RY NEEPSEND.” My real love however, is the reuse of redundant crucibles as rudimentary flower pots, which appear to contain some variety of fern.
    2 points
  29. Hi Derek, here are pictures of the 'Wire Mill Dam' marker post on the footpath running between Whiteley Wood Road and Waggy's Field in S11. I've filled in the report form on your website, (which is very informative), so details there, hopefully.
    2 points
  30. Actually for me it's both basic respect and not wanting to further erode the valuable engravings, pieces of our history that've miraculously managed to survive so long, even in this city-! If they have to be shifted, put them to the side and at a slight incline, but this is Sheffield; let's walk on them for H+S, forget how slippy 'stones get when it's raining.. I've always hated gravestones being used as pavement, reeks of the 'Knows the price of everything but value of nothing' mentality that corrodes beauty. Some in the Gen. Cemetery have been smashed up and used as drain edging next to paths; seriously, wth were the Council on in the '70s?! When I search family history, if I find yet more ancestors buried in the Cathedral, or St Phillips, my heart sinks as I know the memorials they could ill afford, and which I'd've loved to check out, will've just been trashed. While some may 'have no problem at all' with walking on gravestones, others do; why deliberately damage something when you don't need to?! I wish those who'd bought 'stones all those years ago could've somehow known what a waste it was and spent their money on food, medicine - anything, for the living.
    2 points
  31. The current weather in Yorkshire reminded me of another 'Norton ' memory which occurred during the 1962/3 Xmas period . I received a telegram at home (West London ) telling me to get back to camp on 31st December . That was the first and last telegram I've ever had ! As you may know there was a major snow event across the southern half of England and I had to set off up the (new ) M1 in my 1956 Vauxhall car not knowing how far I would get. The major roads had in fact been cleared somewhat , leaving walls of snow on the sides. To my surprise when I reached Derby area there wasn't much snow around. It turned out that some airfield equipment (GCA 'ground controlled approach ' ) was to be taken to Locking in Somerset . It was quite a journey , especially across the Cotswolds from Banbury on a frozen road (A361 ? ). I still don't know why it was so urgent ! Not exactly Sheffield history, but I shows the work done there was of some importance during that ' Cold War ' period , ie. keeping airfield communications and landing aids fit for the job up and down the uk. Thick fog was another hazard for the drivers there at that time especially out to east Yorks airfields at night . I remember trying to get to Elvington or was it Carnaby ? (Bloodhound missiles ) via Church Fenton down narrow lanes in fog one night , it took a while ! Sometimes I would go on a long run with an item not much bigger than a packet of cigarettes , they called , Norton delivered just like Amazon ! I got about £11 a week , so could afford a few pints in the local pub with other lads when the chance arose. This was much better than being stuck in the middle of Lincolnshire on a big base I reckon.
    2 points
  32. The time captured in one small paragraph, my Dad took me into the fish market on Saturday Afternoon for a plate of cockles or mussels, the place was heaving so I had to hold his hand all the time we were in there otherwise I could be swept along with the crowd, it was the only place I’ve ever seen a deer hung up ready to be butchered. All gone, Sheffield is a shadow of what it use to be, the Market is a poor substitute for what we lost. I hate the supermarkets, I would much rather see the small independent shops, grocers, butchers, green grocers, clothes shops, shoe shops, toy shops but their return will never happen, today’s young people just don’t know what they’ve actually missed and if you try to explain, they get that vacant look on their faces as though you’re telling them a made up story, the Rag ‘n Tag should never have been demolished , I could never understand that decision, then to make it into a car park until a few years ago, just criminal, no consultation on the decision to remove what was a Sheffield institution, everybody loved that market.
    2 points
  33. Okay, so, I have tried not to count the ones you have already mentioned above, and this is what I have got so far: William Lawson, '2' (Hornby) Thomas Black '49' (Bachmann, triple set with next two wagons) Tinsley Park Collieries '2241' (as above) Newton Chambers '3751' (as above) Renishaw Iron '917' (Oxford Rail) Nunnery Colliery '1574' (limited edition, by Bachmann for Geoffrey Allison) Manchester & Sheffield Tar Works '19' (limited edition, by Bachmann for Rails) Sheffield & Ecclesall Co-op 'No 13' (limited edition, by Dapol for unknown) T.C.D. Ltd '171' (Mainline) I can also confirm that the Sheffield Chemical Co tank and the Longbottom & Co open wagon on your intial list are both limited editions (respectively for Rails and TMC/Modelzone) Now this list is only of wagons which are classified as the 'Sheffield' district - I have many others which cover Rotherham, Doncaster, Barnsley, Chesterfield, Bolsover districts, amongst others! But I have been collecting these local wagons for around 23 years now, even when I lost interest I didn't sell them as I guessed the interest would come back haha.
    2 points
  34. This must be after the war, the film Two Men and a Girl in the last photo wasn't released until 1947. Nigel L
    2 points
  35. Too many really Just part of the journey in the decline of the Sheffield we’d all known and loved
    2 points
  36. The adjacent block was Dyson House, which was owned by the Poly.
    2 points
  37. Seen them at work today bringing it down. Another one bites the dust.
    2 points
  38. This map was posted on Twitter by the 'Picture Sheffield' website. I hadn't seen it before and thought others might be interested in browsing it. Apologies if it has been posted before. https://www.picturesheffield.com/maps.php?file=008
    2 points
  39. OK not strictly buses/trams, here are a couple of photos from a large transport archive showing inspection of a taxi at East Bank Garage following a collision in 1965. They are Sheffield Transport originals so a record of the incident. Also text from rear. Hope they may be of interest.
    2 points
  40. I have access to some old photo's related to transport in Sheffield. These were in a pack and look like all from same sequence - they all have the same stamp on the back, one has "Sheffield Transport" written in pencil on the back. They could be from Queens Road but that is little more than an educated guess The last image piqued my interest. It has what looks like a mini version Tower of London at the back. Does this mean they are NOT Sheffield? I did see a post from Arif here Pic of Walker and Hall which has a vaguely similar building to the right of Walker and Hall. So where is this? Is it Sheffield? If so where? p.s. it would be great if someone recognised someone! N.B. - expect more soon!
    2 points
  41. These images show Sheffield Transport images of a bus crash on Leopold Street - date unknown. I've included the notes on the back of each photo This may be 1965
    2 points
  42. All six uploaded to your site.
    2 points
  43. Quite so WE I was not very accurate with my earlier post, I would never walk over a known grave purely out of respect (nothing to do with superstition) but my only objection to walking on a gravestone/ headstone that is not over a grave is that I am eroding the inscriptions, which are historic records and I have always found to be of great interest.
    2 points
  44. If you look at Victorian etchings or photos of the Cathedral you can see that the headstones seem to have been always laid flat, but the Victorians laid paths among them and nobody walked on the stones BUT I think it's a case of showing a total lack of respect for the people who's names are on the headstones, to use them as paving slabs is shameful. The finest churchyard I've ever been in is Greyfriars in Edinburgh.
    2 points
×
×
  • Create New...