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  1. tozzin

    tozzin

    Sheffield History Member


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  2. kidneystone

    kidneystone

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  3. Sheffield History

    Sheffield History

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  4. History dude

    History dude

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/08/21 in all areas

  1. Because River Don is the major river of South Yorkshire and flows right across it from the extreme west to the extreme east I have always had an interest in its source. The location of the latter is somewhat complicated by the fact it is dammed very early in its course by the Winscar reservoir which is about 6 miles west of Penistone. However, careful inspection of a large scale map shows that the Don, as a stream, flows into the reservoir's western arm (see pic 1) and its source being just over a mile further west from there at SE 119 027 (see pics 13 & 14). By the time the Don flows into Winscar numerous streams have already converged into it including one from "Don Well" (see pic 6) which is situated at SE 133 027. Despite its name the well cannot really be thought of as the source because the Don is already a significant stream (see pic 5) before it reaches that area. Furthermore the quantity of water flowing into the Don from the well is relatively insignificant, or it was on the day I visited (see pic 8). Arguably, because it is all a little subjective, the Don rises from an area of marshy ground around Withens edge and at that point it appears to be named Great Grain(s). Interestingly the aforementioned area is the watershed for the Don and the River Etherow (see pics 13 to 16) , the latter flowing in the opposite direction and eventually ending up in the Irish sea via the rivers Goyt, Tame and Mersey. The Don's eventual destination is, of course, the North sea so, in this area, drops of rain landing just a few feet one way or the other determines which sea they flow into 140 miles apart. It is not just coincidence that Holme Moss radio transmitter is situated less than 2 miles from this watershed (see pic 13) because transmitters are, ideally, situated at altitude to maximise their coverage. Holme Moss is purely a radio TX these days but when it was built in 1951 it transmitted TV (on VHF) over both sides of the Pennines, just like the Don/Etherow watershed does for water ! Also see : https://drtomsbooks.files.wordpress.com/2019/11/the-yorkshire-river-don-b.pdf Pictures (in rough geographical order E to W) : 1 - River Don entering the west end of Winscar reservoir 2 - River Don flowing down towards Winscar reservoir 3 - Confluence of Little Grain Clough (?) and the Don 4 - The River Don just downstream of Don Well 5 - Last confluence of the Don (or Great Grain) before Don Well 6 - Don Well 7 - Water rising from the marsh at Don Well 8 - Water from Don Well seeping into the Don 9 - Just down from the Don watershed, looking west 10 - Early course of the Great Grain 11 - Typical rising of a watercourse 12 - Great Grain as a brook 13 - River Don watershed facing WNW towards Holme Moss transmitter 14 - River Don watershed facing east 15 - River Etherow watershed facing SW 16 - River Etherow watershed facing SW (note Holme Moss transmitter to the right).
    7 points
  2. Many will 'know' Jack Wrigley from his brilliant 'Sheffield Camera' book series, which detailed photos from his archives across many areas of Sheffield. He was also a member of the Sheffield History site for a while. Sadly news has reached me of his passing, just a few days before his 94th birthday. We've Jack to thank for documenting lots of Sheffield places back to the 1950s via an incredible collection of photographs, and for sharing them via his great books (and some on this website in the past). A small selection of some of his book covers: RIP Jack.
    4 points
  3. Your posts seem to have an aggressive tone we don’t do that on here 👍 keep to fun and friendly please
    4 points
  4. This was a sad story... The owner of the headstone was came form my hometown: Xinhui. The headtone shows owner's information, including where he came from, when he born and dead. The limitied information shown that he only live 33 years old, form 1956-1989, and he have became a father before he dead. I can image that he came here and try to living for a good time, however, he never enjoy The Bliss of Family, which makes me sad.
    4 points
  5. Hi Youdy, syrup is right, it was the Wesleyan Reform Church with a Sunday School at the back leading on to Chelmsford Street. If you would like to look at a photo which may be of interest, go to:- PICTURE SHEFFIELD -- type in the search box top right s03723 -- title 'Helping needy during Coal Strike' ok Heartshome. Edit: link added, (SHB).
    3 points
  6. Im sure there are many memories of the old Tinsley Yard. It's heyday was slightly before my time, although I do remember going to the last few open days growing up. The Sheffield District Railway is a fascinating story. Some of it still used. Some of it left waiting to maybe one day be reclaimed and some of it wiped out. Ironically, it's been in the news this week that the Meadowhall Rd bridge may be taken down.
    3 points
  7. I have been scanning the book "The Village of Ecclesfield" by David Hey (1968) for a relative. I thought I'd share it here. The link is here: Village of Ecclesfield If you want a copy, I'd recommend downloading it onto your computer, as it won't be available via the link forever.
    3 points
  8. I still regret the through way of the Moor to London Road being closed off.
    3 points
  9. I was doing a lot of local history research in the Local Studies. It was a time when you could handle the documents more and there were less rules about. Photocopying machines were getting better each year and you could copy loads of stuff. The early computers started up too. With the Amstrad Green screen and word processing software. Meanwhile Sheffield Council was fighting with the government for every penny it had to spend. Mrs T really had it in for Sheffield.
    3 points
  10. How times have changed! My parents have found this photograph of what appears to be children working in a local steel mill. Has anybody got any thoughts as to where it may be.
    3 points
  11. I took these back in 2013 when I was allowed to climb up the cathedral steeple, there are narrow stairs up to the top of the tower where the steeple then begins. You can walk around all four sides of the tower which is where I was stood when taking these photos of views of all four directions... Towards Church St Looking towards West St Towards Campo Lane Towards Park Sq roundabout
    3 points
  12. Hi, This is a photograph of my grand father Alfred Wells and my father Alfred Edward Wells. They had this shop at No. 2 Brightmore Street between 1902 and 1927 which is next door to No. 87 St Philips Road. The righthand edge of the photo would be joined to the triangular plot No. 87. I have worked out that this is now right under the tram stop on the new dual carriageway of Netherthorpe Road Hope this is of interest
    3 points
  13. Modern day recyclable & very useful tree.
    3 points
  14. This is an observation, not a rant, but I n my view, Sheffield City Centre is gradually becoming one gigantic University campus. Between Sheffield Hallam and ‘Uni of’, they are buying up more buildings in the centre and extending their sites (e.g. GPO Fitzalan Square), which in some cases is not such a bad thing you may say? What is very noticeable is the areas of the city that are being turned into student accommodation and when you think about it, they are almost every where you look.In the centre. The ones that immediately come to mind are the old Redvers House and Telephone House buildings. On the periphery, if you start on Suffolk Road, across Leadmill Road, Shoreham Street, Sidney Street, Bramall Lane, London Road. Up Hanover Way and down between Netherthorpe and Broad Lane. Green Lane, Shalesmoor, Corporation Street, across to Wicker and Blonk Street. Back across Broad Lane and Park Hill Flats, gets you back full circle. Just try doing a Google Map view and see how many label of ‘Student Accommodation’ There are The saddest thing is there are virtually no shops, nor venues worth going into town for any more. Any shop worth visiting has closed, or relocated out of town. Headline bands would rather play at The Arena, than City Hall and probably only The Crucible and Lyceum theatres are still managing to cling on, as there are no out-of-town alternatives.If any open up, the days of those two are probably numbered. Try and park in town to see a show, or go for a bite to eat and you are charged a FORTUNE in the car parks closest to where you want to be. Between NCP and Q Park, they have some exorbitant rates. Fortunately we live close to one of the tram routes, but it’s not always convenient. The centre is almost devoid of any decent shops, but crammed with bars, clubs and restaurants, which all seem to be always packed with aforementioned students, every night of the week and overflowing at weekends. Maybe it’s just my bad luck, but on the few occasions when I’ve been invited to a ‘do’ in town, it really does feel like you are stepping back into ‘studentville’. Mind you, it wasn’t like that in the 80’s, as I recall it 😆 So, would I welcome a new ‘hole in the road’? Why bother? It will cost us the taxpayers a fortune, be no use whatsoever, as pretty soon the whole of the centre will be a huge pedestrian precinct anyway…
    3 points
  15. I don't really want hints a tips, I was quite happy as it was.
    3 points
  16. It might have been a Lantern slide at one time.
    2 points
  17. I cant remember who gave me this copy from 1891 but scroll down to the deaths of August 6/7 & 8th, I just cant imagine the pain and grief that the parents of these poor children went through.
    2 points
  18. I decided to check local newspaper entries to see if its possible to clarify Woodbourne Rd church. The results can be seen below. Unfortunately they don't make it any clearer as Woodbourne Rd is nearly always stated to be Wesleyan Reform . My family were very much involved in Wesleyan Reform & I have spent a lot of time over past 20 years researching the Sheffield Circuit of chapels , 2 of these are in Attercliffe at Surbiton St & Orchard St but none on Woodbourne Rd. In one in 1925 the Minister is Rev E Bromage who was Minister at Bodmin St as can be seem from the 1934 article about his retirement from Bodmin St. So I can only assume that they were both WR churches but Woodbourne Rd probably changed its allegiance (possibly 1933 when they did large extensions) or when it closed possibly before 1950 Here are the detailed newspaper articles : Sheffield Woodbourne rd 19 feb 1909 WOODBOURNE ROAD WESLEYANS Last night a concert was given in the schoolroom of the Woodbourn Road Wesleyan Reform Church. Mr. W. Maltby Wilkinson occupied the chair, and the artists were: Miss Doris Wolstenholme soprano (Millhouses), Miss Clarice Simpson, contralto; Mr. W. Eyre, tenor (Chesterfield), Mr. A. Farnsworth, bass (choirmaster, Church), Miss Doris Perkins, pianist (Dore); Miss Jessie Atkins, elocutionist (Nether Edge), and Miss Amy Atkins, A.T.C.L. (accompanist). Mr, O. E. Smith gave sketches in black and white. 25 oct 1921 Large congregations attended the Band of Hope anniversary in connection with the Woodbourne Road Wesleyan Reform Church, Sheffield. Mr. C. E. Stembridge preached on Sunday morning, the Rev. E. Nicholas in the afternoon, and Councillor T. Tomlinson in' the evening. Last night the special preacher was the Rev. Dawson Parsons (Vicar of St. James'). and hymns and anthems were given by the choir. The collections totalled £9 6s. 5d, 23 sep 1925 The funeral of the wife of Mr. William Brookes. J.P., of Sheffield, will at Burngreave Cemetery this afternoon, preceded a service the 'Woodbourne Road Wesleyan Church, conducted the Rev. E. Bromage, assisted Mr. J. H. Freeboough & the Rev. E. Metcalfe (Wesleyan Union General Secretary). 11 may 1931 LORD MAYOR IN PULPIT. The Mayor of Sheffield (Alderman Harold W. Jackson), in a sermon at Woodbourne Road Wesleyan Reform Church yesterday morning, said that if we were not careful the country would be pagan in three generations. The occasion was the anniversary of the Sunday School, and the Lord Mayor said the world’s happiness depended upon the boys and girls of to-aay- Councillor Luther Milner addressed the scholars the afternoon, and in the evening Mr- Kdgar Butterfield, president of the Sheffield circuit, conduct'd the service- There were large congregations. 10 jan 1933 Woodbourn Road Extensions . At Attercliffe the Church secretary (Mr. Parkin), to mark his 25 years office, has launched a 2.000 shilling fund for the reduction of the church debt. Woodbourn Rd Church, where Mr. W. Brookes is president, has several hundred pounds in hand towards a large extension scheme which, when carried out, will complete a fine block of church properly. Sheffield Bodmin St 1 sep 1903 The marriage took place on Saturday afternoon at the Wesleyan Reform Chapel, Bodmin Street, Atteroliffe. in the presence of a large and fashionable congrogation, of Mr. Anthony Morris, youngest son of the Re James Morris, of Steade Road, Sharrow and Miss Frances Evelyn Barraclough, only daughter of Mr. Edmund Barraclough, of Attercliffe Road. The Rev. E. Bromage, assisted by the Rev. James Morris (father of the bridegroom) officiated. The bridesmaids were Miss F. K. Wain, Bakewell, and Miss G. Chapman, Atterchffe. with Mr. Albert Morris and Mr. S. H. Chapman as groomsmen. 18 sep 1933 At Bodmin Street Wesleyan Reform Church Attercliffe, the Harvest Festival service was held 18 Aug 1934 Bodmin Street Wesleyan Reform Cburch. Sheffield . One of the best-remembered names in connection with Bodmin Street Wesleyan Reform Church, Attercliffe, is that the late Rev. E. Bromage. The present church was built 1891 on the site of an earlier building erected about 80 years ago. Eight years after the new church was opened the Rev. E. Bromage was invited to become minister, and he remained at the church tor 12 years. Nearly 12 years later, after period during which the church had been without minister, Mr. Bromage returned and served for further seven years. He retired in 1929 & the church members unanimously granted him a retiring allowance. He died last December, and the crowded congregation at his funeral service was eloquent testimony of the esteem in which had been held in the district. At the present time, the is church is without a stationed minister, but it is ably served each Sunday by local preachers. Among young people valuable work the Wesleyan Reform Church, Sheffield. is being done by the Sunday School, the Christian Endeavour meetings, and the Boys’ Brigade company, which was started years ago by the late Captain Foster. The church president is Mr. G. Ancliffe, and the other officials are Messrs. A. Parkin and Ward (joint secretaries), Mr, G. Mini (treasurer), Mr. H. Hill (choirmaster), and Mr. W. Smith (organist). The Sunday School superintendents are Messrs. W. Ward and A. Parkin, with Mr. Hill as secretary and Mr. T. Lepson treasurer. The Boys' Brigade captain is Mr. Haywood. 23 Feb 1950 Lord Mayor of Sheffield and Lady Mayoress visit Wesleyan Reform Circuit's 'At Home’ at Bodmin Street Church.
    2 points
  19. Shirecliffe Heliport in action. B&W photos are 1963
    2 points
  20. I think the Swift Tool Set was introduced by Spear and Jackson in the early 1950s.
    2 points
  21. Mabel Brooke ran the sweetshop / tobacconist shop. She was there in 1939 (with husband unemployed clerk Cecil) and still there in 1957 (Kellys Directory). But by 1969 it was in the hands of M. Staniland, a confectioner according to Kellys, so must have boarded over the Brookes' name. Cecil died in 1983 and Mabel in 1995.
    2 points
  22. Here's a stack of pictures all from the March 6 2002 edition of British Railways Illustrated. The first shows the passage to the lift. The second the passage to the station from the lift. 3 is the loading ramp and the end of the passage. Pic 4 is the booking office and the way to the trains. 5 is the subway. 6 is the top end of platform one. 7 is the middle section of the same. And the final one is the end of the line of the track scene from platform 2. All pictures are pre 1965.
    2 points
  23. Post blitz photo of the building. The upper floors were the Waverley Hotel.
    2 points
  24. As I recounted elsewhere on this thread, I actually worked there for several years...when it was still, quite, new..and I thought it a fabulous place....a far cry from the then common, dingy, civic offices ...often just parts of Town Halls where all that could be done, particularly at high volume times, ( ie Saturday mornings), was to ‘tip’ parties out of the door and onto the street to make way for the next marriage party. ‘ So really, this startlingly innovative, so-called ‘wedding cake’ building ...carved out of a relatively private part of Surrey Place was a dramatic breath of fresh air for the Registration Service and its staff who had to operate the place ...and more importantly, were some, only to realise it....for the public, who sooner or later paid (still pay) at least one visit in connection with affairs connected with the three critical stages of the human state, birth, marriage and death. As a one time ‘insider’ and so, for the sake of modesty /inappropriate impartiality, exclude myself in the comment ....I truly believe the Staff there, generally, delivered an excellent service.....it must be said, aided by the well thought - out facility, itself. To condemn the building and it’s grounds as merely some ‘processing plant for people’ is to unfairly, and contrarily, dismiss it ...as I’ve said previously, much more went on there than just people marrying; some business, consequent upon the bringing of new life into the World, equally if not even more, joyful than ( arguably) the main function associated with those places, some, however,.... very grave and often distressing to public and staff alike...as they say, you probably ‘had to have been there’. In my view, the ( only ) problem with civil marriage was (still is ?) the public demand/ fashion(?) to solemnise them on Saturdays ....almost inevitably leading to a ‘production line’ aspect ( wherever they took place) and as I’ve suggested, rather than exacerbating that, ‘ The Wedding cake’ was designed and thus, able to cope with volume without turning events into ‘a circus’. To be perfectly honest, if asked, those of us involved, strongly and enthusiastically, advised on weekday ceremonies as things were invariably much more relaxed, ‘ both sides of the counter with well-spaced appointments, aplenty. ( I well recall a very small but engaging ceremony held on a weekday.. arranged between a French Diplomat and his wife - to-be from The South Seas...strikingly colourful, the parties in Hawaiian shirts and flower leis....I believe that we, those of us officiating, enjoyed the event as much as the parties! Celebrities? I’m sure I’ve forgotten many more ....but as a great fan of the show, one sticks in my mind particularly when several of the cast of TVs ‘Rising Damp’ sitcom turned up in the party...the late, great, Leonard Rossiter and stately, Frances de la Tour, most memorably...certainly made that working day for me! The ROs less lighthearted work left me with some sober but sometimes absolutely fascinating stories about peoples’ lives but their details will just have to accompany me to the grave, in respect for the families concerned...not to say professional constraints. However, I’ll finish with one memory of parents who chose to name their child after the ENTIRE team of a well known football club! Ok, it was mum and dad’s choice at the time and I suppose, at least relevant in the early/ mid 70s.....but what as the years went by...the many ‘handles’ bestowed on them, surely became something of a burden to those kids? I’ve often wondered! As contributors and readers to SH will gather , I remain an unswerving fan of the smashing, thoughtfully put together building...which many Sheffield people of all ages will have memories of. Please be kind to the ‘ young girl’ who never really ‘got to lift her skirts’ before her own ‘disrespectful and untimely death’. Requiescat in Pace...
    2 points
  25. 1 Bromley Street, Sheffield, LINDLEY Mrs. Rose, shopkpr. source: Kelly's Directory of Sheffield & Rotherham 1927. 1 Bromley Street, Sheffield (3), LINDLEY Mrs. Rose, shopkpr. source: Kelly's Directory of Sheffield & Rotherham 1935. 1 Bromley Street, Sheffield (3), LINDLEY Mrs. Rose, shopkpr. source: Kelly's Directory of Sheffield & Rotherham 1937. 62 Upperthorpe Road, Sheffield (6), LINDLEY Mrs. Rose, shopkpr. source: Kelly's Directory of Sheffield & Rotherham 1940. 62 Upperthorpe Road, Sheffield (6), LINDLEY Mrs. Rose, shopkpr. source: Kelly's Directory of Sheffield & Rotherham 1944. 62 Upperthorpe Road, Sheffield (6), LINDLEY Mrs. Rose, shopkpr. source: Kelly's Directory of Sheffield & Rotherham 1948. 62 Upperthorpe Road, Sheffield (6), LINDLEY Miss. Hilda M, shopkpr. source: Kelly's Directory of Sheffield & Rotherham 1951. 62 Upperthorpe Road, Sheffield (6), LINDLEY Miss. Hilda M, shopkpr. source: Kelly's Directory of Sheffield & Rotherham 1954. 62 Upperthorpe Road, Sheffield (6), Brightside & Carbrook (Sheffield) Co-operative Society Ltd. source: Kelly's Directory of Sheffield & Rotherham 1961.
    2 points
  26. I’ve come across another photo of a 1911 garden party at Loxley House. It looks as though it’s the same event. I think my great grandmother may have been there - Mary Jane Schofield aka Mrs John Arthur Schofield. The lady in white with a large hat, seated beside the man talking in the centre. Do you have any further details about the party, or its attendees? I’d love to know more about it. The family were staunch Methodists. could you post a close up of the attendees pls of your photo pls?
    2 points
  27. A bit of late addition to this thread! Anyway, we currently live in Bassett's former residence on Norfolk Road which was built in 1851. We have some of the original handwritten agreements for sale from that time signed by George Bassett and I guess representatives of the Duke of Norfolk. Also further documents up to 1923 etc. I think some of these may be of great historical interest so please respond if interested.
    2 points
  28. Oh I"m the opposite opinion and would have that flattened TODAY if I could
    2 points
  29. A mystery solved, it's the offices of Tetley Brewery off Herries Road, now used by Hallam FM. I'll let them know. I think it's almost certain that the Tetley Brewery illustration below is also by Kenneth Steel.
    2 points
  30. From the OURBroomhall Web site. George Cunningham: The Pickle Makers. https://www.ourbroomhall.org.uk/content/latest-contributions/george-cunningham-history-family-part-2
    2 points
  31. From the album: Castle Market Sheffield

    Castle Market Sheffield
    2 points
  32. Henry Lingard was born in1860, the son of Joseph Lingard a bricklayer, who later became a builder - Joseph's work included houses on Albert Road, Heeley. In 1891 Henry was a builder living at 136 Fitzwilliam street In 1901 he was a builder, employer of bricklayers living at 33 Cemetery Avenue (off Ecclesall Road - General Cemetery gates) and in 1900 sold several pairs of houses he had built in Cemetery Avenue By 1911 Henry and his wife Rose had moved to number 42 Cemetery Avenue and were still there in 1921. Henry died on 27th October 1929 at 234 Psalter Lane and was buried at Ecclesall church. His will left £4,248.
    2 points
  33. Building on the right, was 19th century cutlery works which originally included 6 back to back houses, one of which you can see on the very right edge of the picture. It has been :- The works of Sheffield Metal Co. Toolmakers, Kutrite Group, Moorfield Works. & Creative Arts Development Space, Art Complex. It is a Grade 2 listed.
    2 points
  34. The buildings on the left were the last production areas of Nickel Blanks, manufacturer of spoon and fork blanks, in nickel, stainless steel and sterling silver.
    2 points
  35. In Wards case, the brewery traditionally shared the yeast ( a common agreement in the industry) with Shipstones Brewery in Nottingham which closed in 1991. The yeast itself had a slight issue in that it produced a phenomenon known as cracked ice in the head....as the foam went down it separated into floating islands and whilst the beer was lovely it didn't appear too appetising to a critical eye. They could easily have got around it by using a product called Foam Head Stabiliser...basically Gum Acacia, being a very traditional company Wards preferred not to use an additive. I don't know who made the decision, but after Shipstones closed down, it was decided to stop using the old yeast and use the yeast from Vaux in Sunderland who had been Wards parent company since the early 1970's. At first the change was quite noticeable, the head improved as expected but it did change the flavour and aroma slightly.
    2 points
  36. JoJo never stop using it, it will keep it alive.
    2 points
  37. Wow Syrup thank you
    2 points
  38. Don't know if anybody is interested but here's the view from the top of the Five Arches down Herries Road towards the Wednesday ground.
    2 points
  39. Yes, the stones get a mention in the Megalithic Portal but no historical detail as such.... https://m.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=15515 An interesting comment on there about the equinoxes though!
    2 points
  40. That's not very clear. Images pinched from this site and posted on facebook tend to be crap, try this one 😁
    2 points
  41. I'm glad the site is working again. It's been like the above for several days! What caused it to go like that? Did the site get the new covid strain? Typical - must be one of those not had the jab yet! 😁
    2 points
  42. My wife and I had a walk up to Barkers Pool and on to Fitzwilliam Street, god what a change, Division Street and Devonshire Street has changed, less and less independent shops, in fact I couldn’t see anything but bars and eating places, just what’s going wrong in Sheffield? My walk was a sad, sad thing to experience because I remember when it was a thriving area fulfilling the needs of the people of the city but it seems it’s been turned over to the student contingent, most people won’t see my point of view but they haven’t seen the area as I remember it.
    2 points
  43. 2 points
  44. This afternoon. September 12th 2021
    2 points
  45. I've noticed that in several supermarkets the cashier, after I've paid her, will often end the exchange with a "See you later." My response is sometimes, "Usual place?"
    2 points
  46. I was sent for a trip on the outer circular when I was twelve, a bottle of Jusoda and a packet of crisps, when I arrived back home my family had moved without telling me, if you believe that you will believe anything.
    2 points
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