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  1. My Aunty who lives across the Rd from the old school took photos just before it was being demolished.
    2 points
  2. Vulcan fly past at RAF Norton airshow, year unknown.
    2 points
  3. This is an observation, not a rant, but I n my view, Sheffield City Centre is gradually becoming one gigantic University campus. Between Sheffield Hallam and ‘Uni of’, they are buying up more buildings in the centre and extending their sites (e.g. GPO Fitzalan Square), which in some cases is not such a bad thing you may say? What is very noticeable is the areas of the city that are being turned into student accommodation and when you think about it, they are almost every where you look.In the centre. The ones that immediately come to mind are the old Redvers House and Telephone House buildings. On the periphery, if you start on Suffolk Road, across Leadmill Road, Shoreham Street, Sidney Street, Bramall Lane, London Road. Up Hanover Way and down between Netherthorpe and Broad Lane. Green Lane, Shalesmoor, Corporation Street, across to Wicker and Blonk Street. Back across Broad Lane and Park Hill Flats, gets you back full circle. Just try doing a Google Map view and see how many label of ‘Student Accommodation’ There are The saddest thing is there are virtually no shops, nor venues worth going into town for any more. Any shop worth visiting has closed, or relocated out of town. Headline bands would rather play at The Arena, than City Hall and probably only The Crucible and Lyceum theatres are still managing to cling on, as there are no out-of-town alternatives.If any open up, the days of those two are probably numbered. Try and park in town to see a show, or go for a bite to eat and you are charged a FORTUNE in the car parks closest to where you want to be. Between NCP and Q Park, they have some exorbitant rates. Fortunately we live close to one of the tram routes, but it’s not always convenient. The centre is almost devoid of any decent shops, but crammed with bars, clubs and restaurants, which all seem to be always packed with aforementioned students, every night of the week and overflowing at weekends. Maybe it’s just my bad luck, but on the few occasions when I’ve been invited to a ‘do’ in town, it really does feel like you are stepping back into ‘studentville’. Mind you, it wasn’t like that in the 80’s, as I recall it 😆 So, would I welcome a new ‘hole in the road’? Why bother? It will cost us the taxpayers a fortune, be no use whatsoever, as pretty soon the whole of the centre will be a huge pedestrian precinct anyway…
    1 point
  4. Has anyone else seen this announcement on www.old-maps.co.uk? Assume this means the whole site will close down, whether you have a subscription or not? https://www.old-maps.co.uk/index.html#/ This is a real shame, as lots of detail on Sheffield locations were available here….. 😪
    1 point
  5. Sunshine Cafe, Orchard Street. Sheffield Independent 07 November 1936
    1 point
  6. I have sent them a message asking why they are closing and what will happen to the map collections. I will let you know if they respond.
    1 point
  7. Many thanks to everyone for all your helpful replies. The newspaper article is very helpful. However, it appears, there were two of the cottages (ref. 1939 register) one being Carr Lane which I now think is no. 88, and Main Road, Dronfield Woodhouse which refers to Holmesfield. These both belonged to the same family I believe. Question - were they affluent enough to own two? Mary Brown, the daughter of James Morewood, (who was present at her father's death) stated her address, and his, as The Cottage, Main Road, Dronfield Woodhouse., which suggests she may have lived with her father albeit temporarily during his final illness. The 1939 Register shows this lady to be in ~The Cottage, Carr Lane, Dronfield Wodhouse. Are we to assume that upon her fathers death, she was merely a visitor at another address? Complicated - anyone got any more ideas? Regarding Moorwood's Lane, Holmesfield. Every time I have travelled up and down there I have wondered if there is a connection and would love to know more. Comments please? thank you so much for your imput.
    1 point
  8. Thanks to you both!!!!
    1 point
  9. I've found the National Library of Scotland site a useful place for maps. Try https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=15&lat=53.37477&lon=-1.70450&layers=1&b=1 This has old maps overlaid with aerial shots. By using the slider you can fade from one to the other. There is a wide range of maps to choose from.
    1 point
  10. I now have some pictures to share with anyone interested, from the Town Hall opening 1897 following George Edwin Waddington being invited to attend....
    1 point
  11. I read somewhere that being under weight was one cause…perhaps our diet was deficient although I also read that our wartime and post wartime diets were “heathy”.
    1 point
  12. Chanced upon this while google mapping and remembered the thread. Obviously newer plant than that described in OP and unlikely to be the site either but perhaps further indication of the usage of what was seen all those years ago. This site (near Meadowhall, to the north of Blackburn Meadows) was at one point a slag heap, later used as a dump and it appears the plant is active in an environmental control role. This kind of site - scarred landscapes handed back to nature which often seems reluctant to take them back - is not uncommon around South Yorks. Large areas to the north of Hackenthorpe and Beighton have looked quite similar in the recent past and had gas discharge warnings (perhaps still do). Further afield I can remember walking through parts of the Dearne valley which bore striking similarity. Fingers crossed that the bump will jog somebodies memory.
    1 point
  13. I can’t remember just when I last saw a lad with a scab on his knees, I suppose with short trousers being abandoned sometime in the fifties, knees were offered some protection from falling and grazing or cutting them by being shoved into long trousers plus the fact kids seem to have stopped the rough and tumble of playing on asphalt or concrete. Scabs were a very rare thing on the little girls as a result maybe because of the different types of play, lads scroming trees and walls and girls playing with dolls and prams. I can’t remember not having scabby knees and shins right up to when I got my first long trousers at the age of eleven or so but I do remember the pastime of picking scabs, lifting the hard crust and invariably causing more blood to flow, the times my mother berated me for picking my damaged knees, I’ve never had cut knees, shins or elbows since my step into adolescence by way of my first long trousers, today’s children are dressed as adults as soon as they gain the ability to crawl, lads don’t bare their knees until football catches their attention and in some respect the same happens to girls, school games warranted bare knees but nowadays the play areas have soft surfaces, our children are not made of delicate substances they bounce back, scraped knees grow back, I often catch a glance at my knees and I have to smile as I have the scars to remember falling and ultimately getting scabby knees, ah, they were the days.
    1 point
  14. Sixty years ago this week at the age of 15 I started my plumbing apprenticeship course at the recently opened College of Technology on Pond Street. my apprenticeship was to last for 6 years. Up to the age of 18 plumbing apprentice's attended one paid day release class and two unpaid evening classes per week, then from the age of 18 up to 21 it was three unpaid evening classes, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, catching the bus home, getting changed and back down town to attend these classes became a bit of a chore, especially if I'd been working on the other side of town. The Friday evening class was in the old College of Technology on Tudor Way, just behind the Lyceum Theatre, classes finished at 9-30, and as there were no facilities for making a drink, the plumbing lecturer would allow us to go, a couple at a time to the Adelphi Hotel on Tudor Way (now the location of the Crucible Theatre) for a half of Stones bitter, the back entrance from the College workshops came out on Tudor Place, (the road between the Lyceum Theatre and the Central Library) a short walk along, then across what was at the time a car park, and into the tap room of the Adelphi Hotel. First day at college was a bit of an eye-opener for a lad who didn't do too well at school! especially when the plumbing lecturer handed out log tables and informed us that the math's lesson was to be followed by geometry, So much for leaving school !!
    1 point
  15. I believe the local community group have got the sign from the box. Nigel L
    1 point
  16. I went to Pond Street College of Technology 1960 to 1966 doing ONC & HNC in Metallurgy. All was in Pond St one day & one night a week except when I had to do 3 nights a week in 1962/63 when one night was spent doing maths at an old building on Bank Street. Enjoyed most of my time doing the courses!
    1 point
  17. Still there. The Roman Room was on Orchard Street late 60s, but not sure if it was the same location?
    1 point
  18. There was also Mr. Kites on Division St. right up Dev’ Green end. Also a couple on ‘Eccy Road’. May have found myself in Henry’s a handful of times, as at one time was part of the bar crawl. Never went to Mr. Kites, nor the ones up Eccy Road, as found them too pretentious in the mid-80’s and often frequented by the 10/- millionaires of the parish! “£10 for a small glass of the latest must-drink vino”…… Emperors new clothes if you ask me. £10 a bottle is pushing the boat out for me these days….. 😆
    1 point
  19. It's very difficult to see how the inside of the Shakespeare (Brothers) could have been made up to look like that. There were several possibilities with the "sawn off" corner though the internal layout knocks out many from consideration. Checking some older external photos pretty much fixes it, not unreasonably, as the Fox House, Darnall (cnr Shirland & Ardmore). The windows are interesting, quite similar in form to a number of other former Tennants properties, though using colouration you only now see in their most elaborate surviving designs. The bar paraphenalia looks in keeping with it's later status as a "Stones freehouse", too.
    1 point
  20. Hia Richard. Old maps indicate that " GATE " was the area up off Burnt Hill Lane, left of Hagg Stones. Ok
    1 point
  21. In 1960 I was fifteen and I was six foot tall, so really starting work in short trousers wasn’t really an option, looking back I’m amazed that my school friends and my play pals wore these short trousers all through and every winter, now they get togged up like they’re going to the South Pole , I had a summer coat and a winter coat, it was the same one, a two button fasting jacket but in winter I did turn my collar up and I was wearing my dads shoes when I was twelve, the only winter protection I had was wellingtons, that had R and L stencilled on them so you couldn’t wear them on the wrong feet, I do know that long trousers for schoolboys was forbidden by law during the war and I suppose the wearing of short trousers became the norm until times and fashions changed.
    1 point
  22. This afternoon. September 12th 2021
    1 point
  23. I don't really want hints a tips, I was quite happy as it was.
    1 point
  24. The site was always terrible, only the council could improve it by making it worse.
    1 point
  25. I suggest everyone should email them, I’ve already done it, there’s to much navigation required, they have around 200 of my photos and I want people to get them easily.
    1 point
  26. 1 point
  27. J S Worrall was left £1000 in the will when Joseph Hall the boss of the company died in October 1927 Check the Sheffield Daily Telegraph for Tuesday 31st January 1928. Page 4, column 1. The company may have been S and J Hall, of Hereford Street Sheffield.
    1 point
  28. There was definitely a branch of Bradleys on Chapel walk, i used to supply them. There was also another 'chart return shop' at Firth park, Road Runner records. This shop was instrumental in hoisting 'Renee and Renato' to the Christmas No 1 slot with 'Save your love'. It was quite simple to manipulate the charts in those days with lots of 'freebies' in return for extra entries on to the chart lists. Happy days!
    1 point
  29. Thanks RichardS, I was in sunny Greece when I posted, I found that certificate when I got home.
    1 point
  30. The Bell Hotel pub in Fitzalan Square, pictured between the Classic Cinema and the Sleep Shop in 1971 Notice also the yellow bin outside the cinema - Sheffield used to have loads of those!
    1 point
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