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Showing content with the highest reputation on 30/03/20 in Posts

  1. 1 point
    My grandparents Joseph and Doris Pryor ran the shop at the corner of Parkwood Road and Neepsend Lane opposite Andrews Toledo steel works. My mother (also Doris Pryor) tells me that her father’s shop was destroyed by the bomb that killed a large number of the Breedon family and two members of the Clarke family. She also recalls two boys were blown into the 60-foot crater caused by the blast but were rescued, shocked and scratched to pieces and in a terrible state. The pub you mentioned I think was called the Victoria Pub and nicknamed the Monkey. There is further information about this pub on the Sheffield Forum I believe. https://www.sheffieldforum.co.uk/topic/92439-anyone-remember-the-monkey-at-neepsend/#comments Mum remembers family names of people on or around Parkwood Road were: Mary Milner who ran a sweet shop next to the Monkey pub, Pugh family, Herbert, Frank, and Harry, (nick named happy Harry as always smiling), Mary, Ivy, Doreen, Evelyn & Vera. Other names were the Scotts, Wiberleys, Archboulds, Crooks, Blagdens, Haythorns, Haddingtons, Watsons and Ashby’s. Mum also mentioned Ike Crookes was the man who was the person on blazing Neepsend gas tanks trying to extinguish the fires caused by bombing. Apparently this brave gentleman also saw action in the Navy in the battle with the German Graf Spee battleship. See also: https://www.sheffieldforum.co.uk/topic/250622-crookes-family-from-neepsend-in-the-1920-60s/
  2. 1 point
    I certainly do remember the Christmas lights, Timsons and Cockaynes. 1967 according to Picture Sheffield https://www.hpacde.org.uk/picturesheffield/jpgh_sheffield2/w02776.jpg 1971 https://www.hpacde.org.uk/picturesheffield/jpgh_sheffield2/s45453.jpg
  3. 1 point
    Thank you so much for all of this, which gives me a great deal to go at. Fantastic to see where My great aunts lily and mary lived (i think they were operating as a shop at No 8, certainly when their mother was arrive (she died in 1939).
  4. 1 point
    During the Blitz (night of 12th December 1940) Neepsend Gas works received a cluster of incendiary bombs. The Gas Works exploded as firemen were trying to put out the flames. Then a parachute mine landed between the gasholders, and there was a further mine which landed (probably on number 15 Parkwood Road, per a reminiscence on Britainfrom Above site) ( but see the “bombs map” below) The dead were: Breedon Anita 3 yrs 13 Dec 1940 9 Parkwood Road Breedon Cyril 35 yrs 13 Dec 1940 9 Parkwood Road Breedon Eva 32 yrs 13 Dec 1940 9 Parkwood Road Breedon George 11 yrs 13 Dec 1940 9 Parkwood Road Breedon Terence 5 months 13 Dec 1940 9 Parkwood Road Clarke John 45 yrs 13 Dec 1940 9 Parkwood Road but in 1939 was an unemployed mill labourer, and living at number 22 Parkwood Road with mother Lettice. Possibly they were sheltering with the Breedon family? Clarke Lettice 69 yrs 13 Dec 1940 9 Parkwood Road Munks Frank 52 13 Dec 1940 Parkwood Road The 1939 census (via FindMyPast) shows the Milners at number 8 Parkwood Road: Frank Hides Munks was a Police War Reserve Constable. Frank was a market trader who lived at 36 Rockley Road with his wife Marjorie, and their children Frank H junior (a tram conductor, later to die on 31st January 1942 when HMS Belmont was sunk by a torpedo from U-82 off Nova Scotia), Marjorie junior (an assistant teacher), Reginald (a market trader) and Daphne (a shop assistant). The Victoria Hotel, in whicj Frank may have been sheltering, was at 248 Neepsend Lane, at the corner of Parkwood Road, run by Ernest and Edith Dyson in September 1939. It was nicknamed “the monkey”, as one of its landlords once had a pet monkey. The Dysons were not killed on the night of the Blitz, and the pub seems to have survived. Photos of Neepsend Lane and the gas works are available on PictureSheffield https://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?searchterms=&action=search&keywords=Keywords%3BMATCHES%3B(^|+%2B)Neepsend_Gasworks(%24|+%2B)%3B A pre-war photo shows Parkwood Road going between the largest gas holder and the other four. The odd numbered houses are the nearest and number right to left. A post war map of 1954 shows that the even numbered houses had been demolished due to damage by incendiaries, along with the odd numbers up to 19: There's an overview and research guide of the Sheffield Blitz here: https://www.sheffield.gov.uk/content/dam/sheffield/docs/libraries-and-archives/archives-and-local-studies/research/Blitz study guide v1-3.pdf There are stories about the Sheffield Blitz here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/categories/c1151/ See the comment right at the bottom of the page here: https://britainfromabove.org.uk/en/image/EPW015598 The Britainfromabove site has many aerial photos of the Neepsend area Various photos of Parkwood Road here: https://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?searchterms=&action=search&keywords=Keywords%3BMATCHES%3B(^|+%2B)Park_Wood_Road(%24|+%2B)%3B Further info here: https://www.chrishobbs.com/sheffield/pitsmoorwardead.htm
  5. 1 point
    More on the Town Hall, including our best chance at a representation of it ! First Goslings map of 1836 (town hall is number 12) Secondly Thomas Oughtibridges view of Sheffield (town hall has a number 3 above it, immediately to the left of the Church). The view appears to be from somewhere out at West Bar, we're looking at the back of the current Cathedral. Number 2, could be the Vicarage, any other ideas? Finally a map from 1780, shows where Orchard Street got its name, also that New Street and Figtree Lane were once, one and the same place ...
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