theimposter1979

Which pub did you first get served in?!

15 posts in this topic

As part of my research I thought it would be interesting to hear peoples memories of that glorious moment when you walk in a pub and get successfully order an alcoholic drink for the first time! In my case it was The Globe one month before my 16th birthday. It was also the only time I visited the pub when it was in its original 4 room configuration. I had a pint of Stones and it went down well!

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Probably the White Lion at Heeley at 15. I celebrated three '18th' birthdays (16th,17th and finally my 18th) just up the road in the Red Lion but don't tell anyone :) I spent more than a few hours up at Woodseats too when PC Plod did the occasional round up of under age drinkers, but that as they say is another story.

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I'd moved from Sheffield before I reached drinking age but I do remember going into a pub while visiting my friend. He took us on the bus across what seemed half of Sheffield to a place called The Greystones, I have no idea why, as there were plenty of pubs closer to Meadowhead where he lived. We also went into a small pub just across Leopold Street from the City Hall - I remember that it had those old beer dispensers which were cylindrical, a sort of piston pushed the beer across the cylinder and dispensed half a pint. We went to both these places while we were still sixth formers, I guess we would have been 17.

 

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What, the one on (or possibly just off) Leopold Street?  Could well have been.

 

I've just looked at The Greystones on the internet and am pleased to see that it's not just still there but thriving, owned by an independent brewery and featuring a busy programme of live music, including one or two "name" artists like folk veteran Martin Carthy.

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Yup- real turnaround in the last few years. They have many events in the back room and good beer as well.

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I think The Blue Bell at Hackenthorpe in the days of plastic beer glasses. On weekends (1967/8) the place was always packed to the rafters, really loud live bands and people standing shoulder to shoulder. When they finished a drink most people would drop the glass and give it a kick so at the end of the night when everyone left, the floor would be littered with dozens of plastic beer glasses. Wonder how long that phase lasted and how widespread it was?

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7 hours ago, THYLACINE said:

I think The Blue Bell at Hackenthorpe in the days of plastic beer glasses. On weekends (1967/8) the place was always packed to the rafters, really loud live bands and people standing shoulder to shoulder. When they finished a drink most people would drop the glass and give it a kick so at the end of the night when everyone left, the floor would be littered with dozens of plastic beer glasses. Wonder how long that phase lasted and how widespread it was?

The Buccaneer on Leopold Street had plastic Glasses.

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1 hour ago, syrup said:

The Buccaneer on Leopold Street had plastic Glasses.

So did the Nelson at Moorhead in the mid 70's, at closing time (evening), some of the drunken idiots used to place them on the floor upside down and stamp on them.

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I heard they were introduced to prevent people being 'glassed' i.e. having a broken glass shoved in their face. Or maybe it was simple economics? Either way, it didn't work.

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I was 16 at the time I remember going to the glossop rd dance and going in the mailcoach pub on west st when I went back I was 5 minutes late and could not get back in.

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The first pub I was served in in town was the Tin Pan Alley which was roughly where vodka revolution is now.

5 of us went and 3 of us got in - once we were in we knew we'd get served so we were well pleased - would have been about 16/17

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The George Inn, Market Street, Woodhouse, and I still from time-to-time enjoy a drink there today, even though like most pubs nowadays, it has been 'knocked through' into one big room. I still covet the original 19th century grand-father clock, which surprisingly after all of these years is still extant and still keeping time, even though, it seems to have lost its 'spectacle-plate'.

The George was the preferred 'underage' drinking-den for me and my mates, as the Royal and Angel were sometimes frequented by my father, and the Cross Daggers and Stag, by my grand-father. So essentially, we were unlikely ever to be discovered in The George.

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On ‎04‎/‎02‎/‎2016 at 07:11, THYLACINE said:

I heard they were introduced to prevent people being 'glassed' i.e. having a broken glass shoved in their face. Or maybe it was simple economics? Either way, it didn't work.

Still find them in use of football match-days. I suspect for the reason that you have given, and perhaps also for the simple reason that most pubs never carried enough glass stocks, or a big enough glass-washer to cope with the massively increased demand.

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