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    Edmund

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    DaveH

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    expat

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    boginspro

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 24/05/17 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    Sheffield Archives hold reference PR73 from St Mary the Virgin, Beighton, which includes Enclosure map and award, 24 December 1799. Award includes schedule of corn rents, oaths of commissioners and index. Map gives field names, coloured. Parchment. 29 sheets. The Surveyor was W. Calvert, Darlton. Dimensions: approx. 105cm x 75cm.
  2. 1 point
    At the end of July 1915 the whole of the Company performing "Don't Crush" at the Hippodrome went to the Wharncliffe Hospital to visit the soldiers there, and perform the show, The orchestra from the Hippodrome were joined by the hospital staff and a very good time was had by all. So it appears that the Hippodrome remained a theatre at least as at July 1915, and December 1914 was relatively early in the war to need makeshift hospital facilities.
  3. 1 point
    Just a note on what was on the site of the pool in earlier years. Grace Wilkinson was the daughter of William Wilkinson and Ann Booth of Crowder House. She was baptized on 8th May 1734. When her sister Hannah (Parkin, Lady of the Manor of Darley) died in 1790 Grace was a beneficiary, receiving land, which possibly allowed her the resources to purchase further land nearer home under the Ecclesfield Enclosure Act of 1795, along with her brother John. Grace bought land at the southern edge of the Crowder estate and had a cottage called Longley Bottom built on the land (at the spot to become Longley Park Open Air Swimming Pool). Grace never married, and was buried on 3rd May 1801. In 1851 it was occupied by her great niece Francis Mason (nee Wilkinson) and her husband Thomas. When the Wilkinson family were ejected from Crowder House, in May 1855, they moved into the cottage, and Mary Ann Wilkinson was taken to court by Bernard Wake in 1857 accused of stealing apples from the orchard on the boundary of Longley Bottom and Crowder, due to the boundary being unclear, mainly due to Mary Ann's father William having straightened the zig-zagging boundary stream. The cottage was built on the boundary between Brightside and Ecclesfield, and depending on which bedroom the occupants used the night before a census, they appeared in either the Brightside or Ecclesfield census. Here is the 1892 map, showing the lane to the cottage that was later used as the path to the swimming pool.
  4. 1 point
    I lived in the Durham Ox with my parents and grandparents from the early 1950's to the early 80's. I remember Mudfords well, below them was a newsagents, a chip shop, a hardware shop, a tobacconists and a dance school. On the opposite side of the road was a betting shop, a barbers (I think), a garage, Granellis and another car repair shop which had great excitement once because they were fixing Diana Dors' car. Opposite the Durham Ox were three cottages, but, as a child I rarely got to play with the children there because the road was so busy (no Parkway then, just a railway line). On more than one occasion vehicles speeding down the road failed to take the bend and finished up embedded in our door/wall. Above the Ox was a brewery depot, which started out as Ind Coop & Alsopp, later to be Allied Breweries and Tetleys. It was closed when Tetleys moved their offices to Hillsborough. I no longer live in Sheffield and was so sad to see the state of the Durham Ox now, I hope somebody takes pity on it and does it up, although I am sure the resident ghost might object. I don't really believe in such things but after the pub caught fire on Christmas Day 1973 (I think) it was repaired with some changes and weird things started happening. For example the taps on the beer barrels would be turned to off even though the doors to them were locked and things would fly off shelves. The weirdest thing of all was we would find customers chatting to themselves and when asked who they were talking to they all said it was a man with a funny hand!!!
  5. 1 point
    Have any of you tried Linux Mint, you can try it live before installing, though it will not be as fast live. It is a lot faster than any Microsoft system, no viruses, no problems, easy to install, thousands of free programs, you can do anything that you can do in Windows without buying expensive programs. I have four operating systems installed on my laptop, three are Linux and the Windows 7 which came with it, I only ever boot Windows 7 to solve other peoples problems. My wife now has a Mac because she could wreck the Windows systems faster than I could fix them and the iMac has been indestructible even for her. I hope Microsoft have got it right this time, but I would not bank on it.
  6. 1 point
    What a great piece of home movie history! I'm also leaning towards mid-60's, reinforced with all the reasons everyone has offered above. The 'C' reg. A35 van, spotted by vox, has to be the smoking gun! They certainly weren't taking any prisoners on that road trip and even though the film was spooling slightly quicker than real-time, they certainly had the 'pedal to the metal'! My particular favourite was exactly 5 minutes in, when they pulled out for the overtake, going up the hill on Sheffield Road, between Worsbrough bottom and Birdwell. They did two cars and a wagon in one manoeuvre and pity we couldn't see the expression on the face of the driver of the MG, who was coming in the opposite direction! How narrow was Penistone Road in the photo's? What a cracking 'tache on the Bobby in Barnsley! Fabulous...
  7. 1 point
    I would like to contact any remaining relatives of Samuel Byram and Grace Baxter both died in the 1940's and who lived in Kirby Road Darnall
  8. 1 point
    As the weather has been rather wet this week and it has rained to the extent that wayneybabes who works under the Wicker Arches is in fear of another 2007 flood I decided not to go out on a "where has DaveH been this week" tour of Sheffield as it was still slinging it down with rain. Instead, when it finally stopped raining for a short while I decided to take the dog for a walk around Hollinsend Park. The ground was well saturated with water. Certain areas of the park can remain like this even in dry spells due to those underground streams. Interestingly there was so much ground water that the stream, which can dry out completely, was full and spilling out onto the footpath making it like a little river to walk through. This flowing water was following the path of the stream, even along its hidden, underground route so revealing the exact path of a stream which is not even there in the summer.