peterwarr

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About peterwarr

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  1. Notra Dame

    Some details and pictures are in this book:  https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=growth+of+ranmoor.     The porch was built in connexion with this visit:  
  2. The City Stores

    "Another interesting snippet, people often referred to the Brightside and Carbrook Coop generally as the Stores." Yes, and also the Sheffield and Ecclesall Co-op.  My Grandmother regularly went shopping at the Bents Green "stores".
  3. SHEFFIELD’S GREAT WAR AND BEYOND (http://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Sheffields-Great-War-and-Beyond/p/9813) has just been published.  This is the companion book to Sheffield in the Great War, which appeared recently.   The two books both cover life and events in the city across all years of the First World War, but in addition they emphasize different themes.  The first one contains lots of information (much of it almost unknown) about military hospitals and Sheffielders’ astonishing voluntary efforts.  And SHEFFIELD’S GREAT WAR AND BEYOND also describes the several hundred Sheffield companies (a few large ones but most small and now unknown) which provided munitions and other items for the war effort. It also tells about the Cutlers’ Company and Sheffield University, both of which were very active in the period.  Also included is Sheffield’s own aeroplane, with a caribou motif on its fuselage as well as the city’s name.  Where did that come from and what happened to it?   In addition, SHEFFIELD’S GREAT WAR AND BEYOND is different from any other book by painting a picture of events in the following few years. The city lived through mass unemployment and poverty, widespread strikes, provocation from an active Communist Party, riots and deaths.   Both books are packed with interesting pictures.  As with Sheffield in the Great War, author’s royalties for SHEFFIELD’S GREAT WAR AND BEYOND are sent direct by the publisher to the Royal British Legion for use in the Sheffield area.  Both are worth a look!  
  4.      Following recent publicity about the Slave Compensation Act of 1837, I’ve wondered whether any people in Sheffield received funds in that way.  More than 40,000 awards for loss of slave “property” were made, mostly outside this country, and all claims have now been made available online at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/lbs/.  In many cases, recipients had inherited slaves from an ancestor.       It turns out that only one person in Sheffield was involved – Robert Haynes junior (1795-1873).  He had been born in Barbados (son of Lt General Robert Haynes) but now gave his address as Haymarket, Sheffield.  The 1841 census places him, his (second) wife and two grown-up daughters in the Tontine Inn, and he was awarded more than £20,000 – a very large sum.     He was presumably only a temporary Sheffielder, and later evidence locates him and his family in Thimbleby Lodge near Thirsk.  So why would he choose to be in smoky and dirty Sheffield?  It would be great to know.     Incidentally, no compensation claims were made by anyone in Barnsley, Chesterfield, Dronfield, Ecclesfield, Norton or Rotherham.
  5. The Bombshell Magazine

    The Imperial War Museum has copies:  http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/publication/400000560.
  6. Great War Britain Sheffield

    Another account -- with lots of pictures  http://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Sheffield-in-The-Great-War-Paperback/p/7098  
  7. Some people might be interested in the new book at http://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Sheffield-in-The-Great-War-Paperback/p/7098 .  This includes little-known details of new and old hospitals, changed factories, and the events of everyday life in Sheffield in WW1 – all set in a framework of wider developments.  The city and nation in 1914 are described, and many features are illustrated through particular Sheffielders and places.  With lots of pictures!  (Author’s royalties go direct to the Royal British Legion for use in Sheffield.)
  8. As suggested in the “Sheffield during the war” forum, I’ve now been in touch with Richmond Castle about imprisoned COs in WW1. “Conscientious objection” took a range of forms – some more definite than others. The complete refusers are usually termed “absolutists”, but there were many others with a less extreme stance. Absolutists were likely to be imprisoned, but Richmond Castle has no records of COs imprisoned there. The “Richmond 16”, who left behind graffiti which is still visible, were locked up in the Castle for only a few days before being sent to France. Their death sentences were later reduced to imprisonment. The Castle has almost no information about the 16, but it appears that none of them came from Sheffield. In addition, Richmond Castle was one base for the officially-sanctioned Non-Combatant Corps, so there were a lot of original COs there – ones who had accepted a non-fighting role in the war and were not imprisoned. Some men moved between different CO positions. John Bonsall, previously living in Duke Street with a haulage business in Bard Street, started as an absolutist and then moved to become a cook in an army camp in France. There was no requirement for a religious basis for a man’s CO position. Some claimants before the Sheffield Military Tribunal argued that Socialism was their religion. I’ve also been in touch with the Peace Pledge Union. It turns out that their WW1 material about individual COs is also limited, but they’re working to compile a more complete register. They told me about brothers William and Joseph Parkin, who were both imprisoned with hard labour in Wormwood Scrubs and then Dartmoor. They had been bone cutters in a Sheffield cutlery factory, but it’s not known which one. I guess we’re making progress, but the jigsaw is a long way from being complete! Peter
  9. Sheffield Quakers In World War One

    I’ve now been in touch with Richmond Castle about imprisoned COs in WW1. “Conscientious objection” took a range of forms – some more definite than others. The complete refusers are usually termed “absolutists”, but there were many others with a less extreme stance. Absolutists were likely to be imprisoned, but Richmond Castle has no records of COs imprisoned there. The “Richmond 16” (above) who left behind the graffiti, were locked up in the Castle for only a few days before being sent to France. Their death sentences were later reduced to imprisonment. The Castle has almost no information about the 16, but it appears that none of them came from Sheffield. In addition, Richmond Castle was one base for the officially-sanctioned Non-Combatant Corps, so there were a lot of original COs there – ones who had accepted a non-fighting role in the war and were not imprisoned. Some men moved between different CO positions. John Bonsall, previously living in Duke Street with a haulage business in Bard Street, started as an absolutist and then moved to become a cook in an army camp in France. Most COs were not themselves Quakers. Indeed, there was no requirement for a religious basis for a man’s position. (Some claimants before the Sheffield Military Tribunal argued that Socialism was their religion.) I’ve also been in touch with the Peace Pledge Union. It turns out that their WW1 material about individual COs is also limited, but they’re working to compile a more complete register. They told me about brothers William and Joseph Parkin, who were both imprisoned with hard labour in Wormwood Scrubs and then Dartmoor. They had been bone cutters in a Sheffield cutlery factory, but it’s not known which one. I guess we’re making progress, but the jigsaw is a long way from being complete! Peter
  10. Many thanks Flatlander for the very interesting material about Walter Morrison. I suspect (but am not sure) that he would not usually be included in lists of “conscientious objectors”; I think those are defined in terms of refusing conscription from the outsel. Quite a lot of men were later imprisoned for refusing to obey military orders. That doesn’t make his story any less interesting! Thanks again.
  11. Thanks to all. The Sheffield Military Tribunal did exempt many men who were willing to do work defined as of national importance, and serving in the Royal Army Medical Corps or the Non-Combatant Corps was certainly acceptable. Instead, I’m hoping to learn about the minority who refused any work which would help the war effort and were thus imprisoned. I’m now wondering if they would have been arrested at a later stage – for example when they refused to join their unit as instructed. I’ve separately located some arrests of previously-enlisted deserters, and these were not noted in a newspaper, so perhaps that’s what happened to the COs who were imprisoned. Some facts would be useful to balance all this guesswork! Peter
  12. Sheffield Quakers In World War One

    Looking at the interesting information from Dunsbyowl (25 July 2013), it's puzzling why Mr Hancocks was in jail in June 1915. Conscription was not introduced until January 1916, so he wasn't there because he refused to be called up. Some other anti-war activity? There's a lot we don't know! Peter
  13. Were any conscientious objectors in Sheffield sent to prison during World War One? Checking through the city’s newspaper reports of local Military Tribunal sessions, I see that most claims for exemption from call-up were based on commercial or family arguments. The few individuals arguing from a position of religion or conscience appear to have accepted medical or non-combatant roles as an alternative to becoming servicemen. Despite reading a lot of reports, I can’t find any “absolutists” in Sheffield – men who refused to serve in any capacity and were sent to jail (more than 5,000 nationwide). I suppose it’s possible that those cases were kept out of the papers. But if so I’d expect their story to be publicised in other ways, and that’s not apparent. Do you know of any such cases, please? It would be great to learn about them. Many thanks Peter
  14. I’ve become very intrigued by “relief work” in the city for unemployed men after World War One. What jobs were done, and how was it arranged? As far as I know, work funded by the Council or the city’s two Boards of Guardians included the construction of Prince of Wales Road, Whirlowdale Road through Ecclesall Woods, road work in Pitsmoor and Twentywell, widening Abbey Lane and Abbeydale Road, relaying some tram tracks, constructing Wadsley Service Reservoir, setting out recreation grounds, levelling slopes at Wincobank, garden-building at Firvale, and contributing to other improvements. Does that seem right? And what else was done at that time? For how long did it go on? Anything else? Any ideas/information? Many thanks Peter
  15. Cammell Laird In Ww1

    Cammell Laird's factory in Nottingham was newly built as one of the government's 200+ "national factories". National factories employed a high proportion of women, and were required to make welfare provisions more elaborate than was usual at the time. Separate national factories in Sheffield were operated by Firths and Hadfields. Sorry I don't know anything about Annie. No lists of staff in the Sheffield's national factories are now available, and that may be the case in Nottingham.