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Loxley Congregational Chapel


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#1 Sheffield History

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 11:08 AM

LOXLEY CONGREGATIONAL CHAPEL
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LOCATION
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Loxley Road/Long Lane - Sheffield 6

INFORMATION
Taken from the Sheffield Independent May 29th 1914.

LOXLEY'S NEW PASTOR

Historic Home of Village Nonconformity.

Services in recognition of the appointment of the Reverend F. T. LEATON as the new pastor were held yesterday at Loxley Congregational Chapel. Mr LEATON was trained at Nottingham Congregational College under Principal RITCHIE. He has just completed four years at Whittington Moor. At Loxley he takes charge of one of the most historic of the old Independent chapels, and he follows in a line of faithful and useful ministers who have maintained its best traditions. The last of these was the Reverend John LEE, who held office for 24 years, and died about a year ago.

The recognition service was preached in the afternoon by the Reverend R. W. T. MIDDLETON, of Tabenacle Congregational Church. At the evening meeting the Reverend G. E. GERMAN , of the Abbeydale Church, presided in his capacity of president of the Sheffield congregational Association. He said he felt very strongly that the work before the Congregational churches was the reviving of a really healthy devotional life. The time had come when they must be made simpler, and much more straightforward in the whole conduct of their religious life.

Adjourned to the Public House.

Mr B. W. LINGARD, the secretary, gave a short history of Loxley Chapel, which, he said, was built in 1787 bu a few friends of a Mc GREAVES, a curate at Bradfield, who seemed to have been a popular preacher, too popular for the vicar of that time.

When it was finished consecration was refused because the builders declined to put in an east window, perhaps because they ran short of funds. later it was sold by auction for £315, and became an Independent chapel. The people who bought it held a meeting in it and as was the custom in those days, adjourned to the "Rodney" public-house to discuss the question of how to raise the money. Of one of the early ministers it was written that he
pleased some while he grieved others and profited none. there were early pilgrimages of people from Stocksbridge, and concerning one of these there was on record an item for 9 shillings and 6 pence, spent of ale which was drunk at Loxley.

Anglican Good Wishes.

Messages of goodwill were sent to last night's meeting by the Reverend W. LENWOOD of Meersbrook??(Moorsbrook)Park Congregatinal Church, who preached the anniversary sermons at Loxley forty - two years ago; by Principal RITCHIE, who described Mr LEATON as a zealous worker, and a whole hearted minister; and by the rector of Bradfield, and the vicars of Wadsley Bridge and Stannington.

Among the speakers were mc. A. TODD (representing the Chesterfield district of the Derbyshire Congregational Association), the Reverend T. T. BROAD (Wicker), and the Reverend E. Harland BRINE (Cemetery Road).

#2 Sheffield History

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 06:22 PM

Well you know me and spooky places..

I couldn't resist nipping up there today to take a few shots of how it looks today and couldnt' have been more spooked.

Got there, the place is in disrepair (what is it with Sheffield's graveyards being overgrown rubbish dumps - dont' we have any respect for the dead in our city ?)

The chapel itself is surrounded with a difficult to conquer wall of prickly overgrowth but I managed to fight my way through, passing a chap who was putting an updated inscription on a gravestone (I don't know who was the most surprised to see the other person as I came round the corner !)

After the heart attack from bumping into someone sat on a grave hidden behind the gravestone I got to the chapel...

dg_197.jpg dg_198.jpg dg_204.jpg dg_210.jpg
The Chapel - as you can see it's bricked up at the front, overgrown and run down.


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The front cemetery garden - overgrown and as I walked through it there were graves everywhere, and an extremely wet and boggy ground that my feet sank into up to ankle height.



When you see the graves here it is hard to justify how they have been left to rot like that.

I can imagine in just 5 years it could look just as bad as Wards End Cemetary does today.

Shocking, especially when you see the first picture that showed it and how it can look.

#3 andyc

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Posted 29 March 2007 - 05:03 PM

A couple more recentish pics

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#4 andyc

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Posted 29 March 2007 - 05:17 PM

Top section. Entrance via Long Lane

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#5 Jeremy

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Posted 29 March 2007 - 05:52 PM

I'm fairly sure that some of my ancestors are buried there. It's sad to see it is such a bad state.

Jeremy

#6 andyc

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Posted 24 April 2007 - 11:39 AM

It's a superb building in a prime location. If it wasn't surrounded by graves, I'm sure the property developers would have been in years ago.

Who wants to live in the middle of a graveyard though (apart from a vicar perhaps as lots of vicarages are in or attached to graveyards).

#7 Whelk

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Posted 25 April 2007 - 11:15 AM

I used to attend Cubs/Scouts there.I have spent many a night camping out in the grounds.I always remember that once or twice a year we would give the grounds a good tidy(clearing the weeds/cutting the brambles etc)round the graves.It's such a shame to see it falling into such disrepair.I'm sure there is a few graves of victims of the flood there also,and I always remember on one of a bloke who got run over by a milk float.

#8 andyc

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Posted 25 April 2007 - 05:56 PM

Hi Whelk,

I heard there was a military type who was buried with his horse up there. Have you ever heard that?

I was talking to Ken last year, the guy that's transcribed the headstones and PR's, and he said that the building and graveyard had been bought by someone.

It would make a good function room for the local community or something similar.

I also noticed owl boxes in the trees up there.

andyc

#9 Whelk

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Posted 26 April 2007 - 12:21 AM

Hi Whelk,

I heard there was a military type who was buried with his horse up there. Have you ever heard that?

I was talking to Ken last year, the guy that's transcribed the headstones and PR's, and he said that the building and graveyard had been bought by someone.

It would make a good function room for the local community or something similar.

I also noticed owl boxes in the trees up there.

andyc


off the top of my head I cant remember,I'm afraid.

also looking at the pics the front entrance was bricked up before I started going up there(80's),the entrance used was under the big window as shown in andy's pic (right one)it opened into a big lobby with a kitchen at one side ,a small stairway at the other(leading to the hall upstairs)the main staircase to the hall upstairs and two doors to the chapel itself.struggling to remember how you got to the upper seating in the chapel now

like you say though it would make a good place for the local community,as I cant see anybody buying it for the purpose of a residential property/ies.

#10 Ian Wood

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Posted 22 July 2007 - 05:47 PM

Why Can't I see the top pictures :'(

#11 lesvegas

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Posted 22 July 2007 - 06:31 PM

Where is this place

Directions anyone? I know the Loxley Road/ Long Lane area well or at least i thought i did

#12 tsavo

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Posted 22 July 2007 - 06:45 PM

Why Can't I see the top pictures :'(


Sorry you can't see some of the pictures Ian. They became detatched from the topic during the transfer to another server we made recently. We are reinstating them (slowly) but there's a lot of work to do yet.

#13 tsavo

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 08:22 PM

Till we get the pictures sorted, one here of the chapel in happier times on Picture Sheffield.

Link:picturesheffield t01556

#14 coffee cup

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 08:59 AM

Where is this place

Directions anyone? I know the Loxley Road/ Long Lane area well or at least i thought i did



It is on the left hand side of Long lane going up from Loxley Road, passed the Garden Centre, although from there you will probably only be able to see the overgrown graves.
The main enterance to the chapel is on Loxley Road, just passed Long Lane, it looks a bit like a private driveway, but it isn't, you can walk up it to take a closer look.

;-) ;-)

#15 ChesterJohn

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Posted 25 September 2007 - 07:02 PM

Hi Whelk,

I heard there was a military type who was buried with his horse up there. Have you ever heard that?

I was talking to Ken last year, the guy that's transcribed the headstones and PR's, and he said that the building and graveyard had been bought by someone.

It would make a good function room for the local community or something similar.

I also noticed owl boxes in the trees up there.

andyc

Hi Andy

I am researching my wife's family history and I know that some of her ancestors are buried in this graveyard. Could you let me know whether it would be possible to contact Ken, who transcribed the headstones and PRs as this could be very useful to me.

Many Thanks
ChesterJohn

#16 greenfieldswood

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Posted 11 January 2008 - 11:26 AM

In researching my ancestors I found my great great great grandfather was one of the people who set up the Loxley Chapel and have found many of my relatives buried there. We spent weeks transcribing the relevant names from microfilm of the burial records but have just dicovered a typed transcript in Sheffield Archives. I've a database of where my family graves should be and of most of the section between the drive and the garden centre if anyone is interested.

#17 CDWL

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Posted 21 June 2008 - 10:00 PM

In researching my ancestors I found my great great great grandfather was one of the people who set up the Loxley Chapel and have found many of my relatives buried there. We spent weeks transcribing the relevant names from microfilm of the burial records but have just dicovered a typed transcript in Sheffield Archives. I've a database of where my family graves should be and of most of the section between the drive and the garden centre if anyone is interested.



Hello
I am researching the life of my Grandfather, Colin Lees, and he was buried in Loxley cemetery in August 1941. Also there is his wife. Lily Lees, buried in May 1946 and also in the same grave my Aunt Mabel (not usre of her surname, I think it was Morton). The grave number is 36 and Line J. There was a marble memorial to them. I would be grateful if you could have a look and see if they are on your list. Many thanks. I live in Cheltenham but would very much like to go up and see if I can find the graves and see what needs to be done. The description of the state of the graves sounds dreadful. I have a letter from Joseph Tomlinson marked 'Deeds of Grave'. Surely it is the responsibility of the Sheffiled Burial and Cemetery Company to ensure that the graves are maintained in a reasonable state.
CDWL

#18 YJT

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Posted 25 September 2008 - 03:12 PM

Hello
I am researching the life of my Grandfather, Colin Lees, and he was buried in Loxley cemetery in August 1941. Also there is his wife. Lily Lees, buried in May 1946 and also in the same grave my Aunt Mabel (not usre of her surname, I think it was Morton). The grave number is 36 and Line J. There was a marble memorial to them. I would be grateful if you could have a look and see if they are on your list. Many thanks. I live in Cheltenham but would very much like to go up and see if I can find the graves and see what needs to be done. The description of the state of the graves sounds dreadful. I have a letter from Joseph Tomlinson marked 'Deeds of Grave'. Surely it is the responsibility of the Sheffiled Burial and Cemetery Company to ensure that the graves are maintained in a reasonable state.
CDWL


Joseph Tomlinson is my Great great.... Grandfather, father of George Tomlinson who married Ethel Morton - hence the Tomlinson Morton connection.

Yvette

#19 greenfieldswood

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Posted 26 September 2008 - 08:59 AM

Sorry, but the Lees are not in the bit of the churchyard I've mapped. I've only done the Eastern section in any detail and there are six other sections including the terrace. I was interested in early burials of the 19th century, and it would appear that yours are more than likely in the later Section NE2 near Long Lane. I'll have alook in the records when I'm next at Sheffield Archives. There is a site plan at: http://freepages.gen.../planloxley.htm
As you will see, there are only row J's in the west and NE2 sections.

Greenfieldswood

#20 CDWL

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Posted 26 September 2008 - 06:47 PM

Joseph Tomlinson is my Great great.... Grandfather, father of George Tomlinson who married Ethel Morton - hence the Tomlinson Morton connection.

Yvette



Hello Yvette

That is interesting. I assume that Ethel Morton must have been Cyril Morton's sister. By the way Cyril and Mabel (nee Lees) Morton's daughter Rosalind Keefe lives in or near Sheffiled, I belive at Woodhouse or possibly Dronfiled Woodhouse. She was a Sister at one of the hospitals in Sheffiled.

CDWL

#21 CDWL

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Posted 26 September 2008 - 06:54 PM

Sorry, but the Lees are not in the bit of the churchyard I've mapped. I've only done the Eastern section in any detail and there are six other sections including the terrace. I was interested in early burials of the 19th century, and it would appear that yours are more than likely in the later Section NE2 near Long Lane. I'll have alook in the records when I'm next at Sheffield Archives. There is a site plan at: http://freepages.gen.../planloxley.htm
As you will see, there are only row J's in the west and NE2 sections.

Greenfieldswood


Hello. Thank you for your message. I did manage to get in contact with a Mark Whiehouse who I think is on the Loxley Council and he found the graves. I received an email from him on 8 April this year and I quote: "I’ve found the graves of your grandparents and aunt. I’ve taken a few photos and will try and download these and email them to you later. Next time that you come to visit let me know and my wife or myself will show you where the grave is.".

But since then I have heard nothing despite sending Mark several emails. He did not give his contact number and I could not find any details in the phone book! Pity because we passed through Loxley in August this year and we could have seen the graves.

I think your assumption that the grave is near Long Lane is probably right. I did ask Mark if he could decribe where on the plan the grave is but there was no reply. I will now try and send to him again.

Regards
CDWL

#22 ukelele lady

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 09:41 PM

I have got records of my ancester being , quote " a member of Loxley Chapel " in 1812 but it seems the
transcriptions don't go back that far. I got the impression from Ken it wasn't built then, now I see it was built 1787.
Please help! :huh:

#23 SteveHB

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 03:30 PM

Sorry no date to this one
loxley_chapel.jpg

#24 Berlizmo

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Posted 11 March 2010 - 10:50 AM

Sorry, but the Lees are not in the bit of the churchyard I've mapped. I've only done the Eastern section in any detail and there are six other sections including the terrace. I was interested in early burials of the 19th century, and it would appear that yours are more than likely in the later Section NE2 near Long Lane. I'll have alook in the records when I'm next at Sheffield Archives. There is a site plan at: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancest.../planloxley.htm
As you will see, there are only row J's in the west and NE2 sections.

Greenfieldswood

Hello,
Just found this website whilst searching for info on Loxley Congregational Church. I tried to follow the link for the burial site plan but it said page couldn't be found,(perhaps because of the time lapse?). is it possible to let me have the link again or tell me where to find the page.
A Christiana Mount ( younger sister of my great-great grandfather) was christened at Loxley Congregational in 1833 and doesn't seem to have survived until 1841 so thought there was a strong possibility she was buried in Loxley.
Any help appreciated.
Berlizmo

#25 RichardB

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Posted 11 March 2010 - 11:25 AM

Hello,
Just found this website whilst searching for info on Loxley Congregational Church. I tried to follow the link for the burial site plan but it said page couldn't be found,(perhaps because of the time lapse?). is it possible to let me have the link again or tell me where to find the page.
A Christiana Mount ( younger sister of my great-great grandfather) was christened at Loxley Congregational in 1833 and doesn't seem to have survived until 1841 so thought there was a strong possibility she was buried in Loxley.
Any help appreciated.
Berlizmo

Can't help with the map I'm afraid. The page appears to have been removed.

However, Christiana Mount - death Oct-Dec quarter 1838, Ecclesfield (Volume 12, Page 107) might be worth looking into further.

Good Luck; keep us posted on your progress please.

#26 Berlizmo

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Posted 11 March 2010 - 11:56 AM

Can't help with the map I'm afraid. The page appears to have been removed.

However, Christiana Mount - death Oct-Dec quarter 1838, Ecclesfield (Volume 12, Page 107) might be worth looking into further.

Good Luck; keep us posted on your progress please.

Thank you - shame about the map!
The Christiana Mount who died in 1838 was the mother of the one who was christened 1833 at Loxley Congregational, have just recently received a copy of the death certificate confirming this. She died whilst living at Wortley and her husband Richard Mount had three sons to bring up. A few years later he married Hannah Hobson.
Richard's widowed mother Sarah Mount farmed at Worrall in 1841 and 1851and his brother John Mount farmed at Loxley in 1841, 1851 and 1861. He lived a few properties away from the Admiral Rodney in the 1861 census, but near to Loxley Hall in the 1841 census, perhaps the enumerator followed a different route in each.
If any one comes across info on where young Christiana might be buried would be grateful. Also would like to find out where John Mount's farm might have been.
Thanks
Berlizmo

#27 ukelele lady

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 02:40 PM

Hi Berlizmo
Just spent 30 mins posting you some information on the Mounts but lost it all.
Couldn,t post you the info because there's no upload box to click.
Will try again in a month. Ukelele Lady.

#28 Gramps

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 11:42 PM

8<.....

Richard's widowed mother Sarah Mount farmed at Worrall in 1841 and 1851and his brother John Mount farmed at Loxley in 1841, 1851 and 1861. He lived a few properties away from the Admiral Rodney in the 1861 census, but near to Loxley Hall in the 1841 census, perhaps the enumerator followed a different route in each.
If any one comes across info on where young Christiana might be buried would be grateful. Also would like to find out where John Mount's farm might have been.
Thanks
Berlizmo


This might help...but it might not. :)

There was a farm on the edge of Wadsley village called Loxley House farm - on Bland lane. (Just a couple of fields away from Loxley House)

Another farm quite close to the bottom of Rodney Hill was Loxley Chase farm -on the corner of Loxley road and Black lane.

And another farm called Rodney farm which has disappeared under Loxley cemetery. The entrance and track down to this was opposite the Admiral Rodney pub.

#29 ukelele lady

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Posted 15 March 2010 - 07:04 PM

Hi berlizmo
One of my ancesters lived at a farm in Worrall, he was a member of the Loxley chapel and according to the minutes taken
[viewed at the archives] he was dismissed in 1806. From there he went to the Garden Street Chapel and was made deacon in 1813.
He and some friends from Garden Street Chapel founded the Worrall Congregational Chapel. He and his wife died 1845 and
1849 .Looking down the names of the Worrall Chapel you can see some Mounts mentioned, they most likely of the same family as the
ones you mentioned.. They might not necessarily be buried at Loxley as I would have thought my ancesters were but then I discovered
they were buried at St Pauls.

worrall congreg.jpg worrall congreg cpl.jpg


worrall con cpl.jpg worrall congr cpl.jpg

#30 Berlizmo

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 12:28 PM

Hi berlizmo
One of my ancesters lived at a farm in Worrall, he was a member of the Loxley chapel and according to the minutes taken
[viewed at the archives] he was dismissed in 1806. From there he went to the Garden Street Chapel and was made deacon in 1813.
He and some friends from Garden Street Chapel founded the Worrall Congregational Chapel. He and his wife died 1845 and
1849 .Looking down the names of the Worrall Chapel you can see some Mounts mentioned, they most likely of the same family as the
ones you mentioned.. They might not necessarily be buried at Loxley as I would have thought my ancesters were but then I discovered
they were buried at St Pauls.

worrall congreg.jpg worrall congreg cpl.jpg


worrall con cpl.jpg worrall congr cpl.jpg

Hi Ukelele Lady
Thatís amazing, thanks so much.
Your extract gives the date of death of my 4 x great grandmother, Sarah Mount. I think her farm then went to her son Joseph Mount (also mentioned here) and in 1911 his son Mark was farming at Worrall Grange. I can place most of the other Mounts mentioned, and am busily working on the others! The Nancy Mount listed was Sarahís daughter and the Benjamin Mount who it says died in 1847 was Sarahís brother-in-law. Other surnames in these extracts that have connections with my family are Ibbotson, Sorsby, Helliwell and Windle.
Thanks again
Berlizmo

#31 Berlizmo

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 12:43 PM

This might help...but it might not. :)

There was a farm on the edge of Wadsley village called Loxley House farm - on Bland lane. (Just a couple of fields away from Loxley House)

Another farm quite close to the bottom of Rodney Hill was Loxley Chase farm -on the corner of Loxley road and Black lane.

And another farm called Rodney farm which has disappeared under Loxley cemetery. The entrance and track down to this was opposite the Admiral Rodney pub.

Hi Gramps
I have found Bland Lane on an 1850s map, also the outline of farm buildings on the lane opposite the pub, though the farm isnít named. I have not way of knowing at the moment if any of these are where John Mount lived, but hopefully in the futureÖBy the way, were there two Loxley Houses, one near Bland Lane and one by Loxley Chase or is it just the writing on the old maps and my eyesight?!
Thanks
Berlizmo

#32 Gramps

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Posted 17 March 2010 - 11:22 PM

Yes there were two Loxley Houses....there still are according to streetmap.co.uk. Not sure which of them is the earlier one, but the one near Wadsley village is the more famous. The other, to the west of Long lane looks like a farm on the 1850 map but is definitely just a house now according to satellite view on Goodle maps.

It might be worth contacting Malcolm Nunn at Bradfield Parish Archives about the occupancy of the old farms around Loxley.

http://www.bradfield...ives-a-history.

#33 the thinking reed

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 06:27 PM

A recent visit to Sheffield found me seeking out Loxley Chapel and burial ground. Like a lot of other people I am investigating my family tree and have discovered that a number of my relatives are buried there. Even through I had read a little about the place on this forum I was shocked at the state of both the building and cemetery. After a long search I was unable to identify the family graves and came away quite distressed at the total and utter neglect. My horror was increased on the discovery that the burial ground is still accepting new customers, as it were. I canít help but feel that this is a shocking state of affairs being a microcosm of much which is wrong with our society. Here lay our dead. Sheffield people laid to rest in originally quite beautiful surroundings but now ignored and forgotten. How did this come about? When did we stop caring about our forbears to the extent that we allow their graves to disappear?

I presume that there is an official responsibility for the upkeep of burial grounds? So why is this not happening? Cost? Lack of interest? Personally I see a joint responsibility. We should respect our dead and perhaps a mixture of pressure to better maintain these places, coupled with a willingness to collaborate in this personally, could halt this appalling situation.

I hear that the chapel itself is listed but has changed hands. On inspection the door is wide open, having been broken in and legal, or illegal, internal demolition started with panelling, floorboards and pews now missing. Everything that remains is clearly vulnerable to removal or destruction. What exactly is planned for this lovely old place? Apartments? Does the new owner acknowledge the need to preserve anything of this important place? I would be very interested to know who owns this building and their intentions for it, including the impact on the graveyard.

Loxley chapel and cemetery are important, aesthetically, socially and historically. Is there anyone else who shares my feelings? Anyone else who is prepared to join me in trying to do something about this? I for one am not happy with sitting by and allowing the remains of my family to lay forgotten in a jungle of brambles.

I realise that this is not a unique or new phenomena but perhaps it is time that something was done, at Loxley and any other similarly neglected cemeteries in Sheffield

Maybe if we respect the past and those who lived there we will better respect the present and those who live there!

Iain Kelly, Shropshire

#34 hilldweller

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 08:20 PM

A recent visit to Sheffield found me seeking out Loxley Chapel and burial ground. Like a lot of other people I am investigating my family tree and have discovered that a number of my relatives are buried there. Even through I had read a little about the place on this forum I was shocked at the state of both the building and cemetery. After a long search I was unable to identify the family graves and came away quite distressed at the total and utter neglect. My horror was increased on the discovery that the burial ground is still accepting new customers, as it were. I canít help but feel that this is a shocking state of affairs being a microcosm of much which is wrong with our society. Here lay our dead. Sheffield people laid to rest in originally quite beautiful surroundings but now ignored and forgotten. How did this come about? When did we stop caring about our forbears to the extent that we allow their graves to disappear?

I presume that there is an official responsibility for the upkeep of burial grounds? So why is this not happening? Cost? Lack of interest? Personally I see a joint responsibility. We should respect our dead and perhaps a mixture of pressure to better maintain these places, coupled with a willingness to collaborate in this personally, could halt this appalling situation.

I hear that the chapel itself is listed but has changed hands. On inspection the door is wide open, having been broken in and legal, or illegal, internal demolition started with panelling, floorboards and pews now missing. Everything that remains is clearly vulnerable to removal or destruction. What exactly is planned for this lovely old place? Apartments? Does the new owner acknowledge the need to preserve anything of this important place? I would be very interested to know who owns this building and their intentions for it, including the impact on the graveyard.

Loxley chapel and cemetery are important, aesthetically, socially and historically. Is there anyone else who shares my feelings? Anyone else who is prepared to join me in trying to do something about this? I for one am not happy with sitting by and allowing the remains of my family to lay forgotten in a jungle of brambles.

I realise that this is not a unique or new phenomena but perhaps it is time that something was done, at Loxley and any other similarly neglected cemeteries in Sheffield

Maybe if we respect the past and those who lived there we will better respect the present and those who live there!

Iain Kelly, Shropshire

Back in the 1970's I attended a funeral service in the chapel and an internment in the cemetery behind it.
I remember a beautiful Georgian interior decorated in pastel shades which was by then showing signs of neglect.
I front of the chapel I noticed a large family vault covered by the largest slab of cut stone I have ever seen.
I too share your feelings about how we treat the last resting places of our dear departed.
I suppose that when a congregation dwindles to naught, then there is not a lot can be done, but you would think that the upper echelons of the church involved would ensure that proper provision is made. I suppose that this would be one of the many divisions of the Methodist church.
Perhaps some-one on the Loxley parish council would be able to give you some information.
hilldweller ( a former traipser of the Loxley Valley ).

#35 the thinking reed

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 10:10 AM

Hilldweller, when I visited there was quite a lot of snow but I did notice that stone slab, wondering what it could be! They certainly don't make them like that anymore.

After my post yesterday I made a fair amount of progress regarding Loxley Chapel. Upon speaking to 2 English Heritage offices, 2 Conservation Officers, Bradfield Parish Council, the current owner of the chapel and burial ground and the ex Chairman of the Bradfield Community Forum I now have a better understanding of the circumstances. The chapel AND burial ground both belong to the Hagues, of Hague Farming, Bradfield. I had a very frank conversation with William Hague who was extremely helpful and informative. The situation regarding the graves and cemetery is quite complicated as I believe freehold obviously now belongs to the owner but the grave plots belong to the families of the deceased, who ďboughtĒ the plot. Some maintenance work has been carried out by the owner. Sheffield Council seem to want nothing to do with this, as it is a privately owned ground. I would argue at this point that I personally consider the church to have a degree of responsibility to make provision for the future of their interned brethren when they sell their buildings and our dead, and also I would strongly question the law which allows a private individual to buy the land on which are buried citizens, this seems wrong somehow. It is not hard to understand why the owner perhaps does not want the responsibility of the upkeep and would be happy for this to fall elsewhere. It is my impression that the owner does not want the burial ground and it is worth mentioning that despite the Councilís suggestion to close it, it remains open for business purely at the behest of the owner. Worth mentioning also is that work has been carried out on the chapel to prevent further decay. I believe there may have been theft of roof lead, heating pipes and other internal fittings.

Non the less the situation remains the same and I still feel that a solution should be sought. I was also informed that there was a move from a community based organisation to make a bid for both chapel and cemetery with a view to bringing both back into the fold of the community. It appears that this actually had the blessing of all sides (including English Heritage who have the building on their ďat riskĒ register) but that the proposal may have faltered. I am going to pursue this and see what can be done to regenerate interest in the proposal. Please do get in touch if you can further the cause in any way.

Iain

#36 SteveHB

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 10:43 AM

Topics merged.

#37 hilldweller

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 05:50 PM

I front of the chapel I noticed a large family vault covered by the largest slab of cut stone I have ever seen.

I don't know who is interred under that great slab of stone, but when the last trump sounds and time shall be no more, they're going to have a heck of a job getting out from under that.
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#38 livingstone

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Posted 16 January 2011 - 10:41 PM

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#39 ukelele lady

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 10:31 PM

Thank you for the pictures livingstone but how depressing.

Surely something could be done with this wonderful building,
the folks outside must be turning in their graves. :(

#40 livingstone

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 07:45 PM

Thank you for the pictures livingstone but how depressing.

Surely something could be done with this wonderful building,
the folks outside must be turning in their graves. :(


I agree. Unfortunately I don't think anything will be done with it as we all know the chap that owns its' past (and current) record.
The site isn't really suitable for a residential conversion, but I'd like to see it brought back into the public domain as an art gallery or something along those lines

The layout of the place is fantastic and rather surprisingly it's in quite a good condition - the roof looks to have been up-kept, though I'm pretty sure that this is due to it's proximity to Loxley. If you start having obviously derelict buildings around urban areas you're bound to have the local yoof around with cider and matches at some point - which never bodes well with the council.

I can't work out if buying all derelict property in the area is a cunning business strategy to keep out developers and keep a tighter control of the micro-economics of house pricing in said area (given the extensive property catalogue the chap(s) have), or it's just some kind of mental compulsion.
Either way I'll have a good few historical buildings to watch crumble whilst I ponder.